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February 26, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page 2-Sunday, February 26, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Miner
" Guaranteed health benefits, in-
cluding a $5 million fund to compensate
for a reduction in benefits announced in
July 1977. The operators also agreed to
underwrite pension benefits now in
existence.
SMiners who honor picket lines will not
be disciplined.
* No incentive pay and no probationary
period.
After the contract is distributed to the
UMW's 160,000 members, the
ratification procedure is expected to
take at least a week and officials,
predict it will take another 20 days
before the mines are ready for
reopening.'
Early reaction from miners was
mixed.
MINERS IN Kansas and Kentucky
employed by the Denver-based Pit-
tsburg and Midway Coal Co. rejected a
tentative agreement reached Monday
xith the UMW.
THEHIOHLANDS
1 and 2 bedroom apartments
includes security lock system, drapes,
dishwasher, lighted tennis courts, and
pool
Buses to and from campus daily
1693 Broadway, Apt. 302
769-3672
Reaume and Doddes Management Co.

beg in to

reject contract

MA
AJIIT
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

The agreement was the model for the
settlement between the UMW and the
130-member Bituminous Coal
Operators Association announced by
President Carter Friday just two hours
before he planned to intervene to end
the nation's longest coal strike.
A UMW spokesman in Washington
declined to evaluate the significance of
the 356-163 vote by miners. "I have no
comment or interpretation on the vote
at this time," the spokesman said.
EVEN IF UMW miners working for P
and M in Missouri endorsed the ten-
tative settlement, the spokesman said it
would represent too few votes to over-
turn the rejection.
United Mine Workers leaders plan to
push for ratification of the new coal
contract proposal through television
and newspaper ads, and miners will
feel further pressure from the ad-
ministration, officials said yesterday.
"This agreement serves the national
interest as well as your own interest
and those of your families," he said. "If
it is not approved without delay, time
will have run out for all of us and I will
have to take the drastic and unsatisfac-
tory legal action which I would have
announced."
SAID JERRY JONES, president of
Nurses to
discuss
unresolve
contract
By SUE WARNER
Members of the University of
Michigan Professional Nurse Council
will meet tonight to discuss the
unresolved issues which are stalling
settlement of a new contract between
the nurses and the University.
"We have narrowed the field down to
key professional and economic issues,"
said Margo Barron, council chair-
woman. The council represents over 800
non-supervisory nurses at the Univer-
sity and is affiliated with the Michigan
Nurses Association.
T1lE NURSES' current contract was
originally set to expire last Dec. 31, but
was extended twice and is now set. to
expire Tuesday night.
"The negotiations are continuing and
we're making progress," said Univer-
sity negotiator John Forsyth. Forsyth
said negotiators for the two sides will
meet again Tuesday.
Both Barron and Forsyth refused to
comment on the specific unresolved
issues.

Local 21 at Sesser, Ill., ."He didn't give
you much of a choice ... either sign the
contract or the government will take
over the mines."
Administration officials said Carter
had been prepared to order miners
back to work under the Taft-Hartley
Act and also was ready to seek
congressional approval for federal
seizure of the mines.
Sources said yesterday this was the
primary threat used by Carter's trade
negotiator, Robert Strauss, and other
administration officials as they convin-
ced the BCOA's top leaders to accept
the pact.
NOW, officials said, that same type of
pressure will be turned on miners.
A UMW spokesman said the union
plans "some television, some

newspaper ads - mostly small town
stuff, no big blitz."
Sources said Labor Secretary Ray
Marshall and other top administration
officials also will publicly and
repeatedly urge miners to ratify the
pact.
12 "I'D GO BACK under the money
part," said Pressley Brandon of Ford
City, PA. "I would not sign it if there's a
clause in it regarding any fines or
penalties for guys who go out on wildcat
strikes."
Unhappy miners were the most,
vocal.
In West Frankfort, Ill., 2,000 of them
- about a fifth of the state's member-
ship - chorused "No," when asked
"Are we going to accept this contract?"
James Kelly, president of District 4 in

-l5sT A
f le=OPOLITUICAL,
FoddE.APIN(Ab
Well, folderol and fiddle-dee-dee!
Heres Concillanuagemadeeas

Uniontown, Pa., gave the contract a
"50-50 chance." John Secon, president
of Local 1412 said, "If it is anything like
the P and M contract, it will never
pass."
A dozen miners picketed UMW
headquarters in Washington yesterday
objecting to the pact.
POETRY AWARD
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Bin
Ramke, an English teacher at Colum-
bus College in Georgia, has been named
the 1977 winner of the Yale Series of
Younger Poets. The Texas-born Ranke,
is a past editor of the Ohio Review. His
prize-winning volume is titled "The Dif-
ference Between Night and Day."

JOHN FORD DAY
Most people think of John Ford as a director of westerns, but beyond his
landmark work in that genre runs a whole string of films relating to the
over-the-shoulder view of a first generation American towards his ethnic
background.
Directed by John Ford (At 7) THE QUIET MAN (with John Wayne) at 3
THE INFORMER (At 7) HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY (At 9)
CINEMA GUILD OLD ARCH. AUD.
One Show: $1.50, Two Shows: $2.50, Three: $3.00

CINEMA II

Angell Hall Aud. A
Sunday, February 26

KLUTE
Director ALAN PALUKA (1971)
JANE FONDA reaffirms her break from the stereotipic roles of Barbarella
and Catbalu to emerge in this powerful and sensitive portrayal of a New
York City call girl pursued by an ex-client. DONALD SUTHERLAND plays the
persevering detective who befriends her. These two compeling performances
mdke this otherwise haunting and suspenseful film real. $-{.v.
U8Erp.m. $1.50
2 TUESDAY: Tanner's LA SALAMANDRE

By KEITH RICHBURG
A deluge of new legislation will be
coming before the Ann Arbor City
Council in the next few weeks - the
human rights ordinance, the human
rights commission, and the second part
to the new pornography law, to name a
few.
An onslaught of concerned citizens
will probably be flocking to the Coun-
cil's Monday night meetings, but once
there they may find themselves con-
fronted with eleven strange beasts
known as the Mayor and Council, all
speaking to each other in foreign
tongues only they understand.

To guide the beginning Council-goer
through the colloquialisms and idioms
of that body known as City Council, The
Daily has prepared this newcomer's
glossary of the most oft-used terms:
SILLY SEASON (compliments of
Gerald Bell, R-Fifth Ward) - The
weeks just before an election during
which both sides accuse the other of
playing election year politics.
POLITICAL WHIPPING POST (Earl
Green, D-Second Ward) - An issue
brought before Council that would not
have been introduced had it not been an
election year. A red herring.

POLITICAL WHIPPING DOG
above).

(See

FOLDEROL (Compliments of Louis
Belcher, (R-Fifth Ward) adjectiv:
trivial, irrelevant. Noun-: an irrelevant
issue, a bill or amendment introduced
only for political reasons.
CANNON FODDER (genus Belcher)
- Noun; when used with folderol
denotes any irrelevant, purely political
issue. As in, "This is purely political
folderol cannon fodder put out by the
Democratic caucus!
See HERE'S, Page 7

Thompson Apat tments
furnished e iciencies
1 and 2 bedroom apartments
available for Fall 1978 occupancy
Located at corner of
William and Thompson
call 665-2289

Innovations increase facilities-
Law library goes underground

S
M
Y
P-
P
I,

- -
rkIVEkSITY VMUSICAL 8OCIETY presents
Thol -4

By ANIDA ROSSMAN
Overcrowding in the law school
library prompted the university to un-
dertake - or perhaps it would be better
to say take under - construction of one
of the most innovative buildings on
campus.
Groundbreaking for a new $9 million
underground library took place earlier
this year, and the structure should be
finished by 1980.

The library, which has been planned
for three years, is being funded by
alumni donations and several large
foundation grants.
THE "L"-SHAPED building will be
three stories (60 feet deep), covering.
62,500 square feet. Parallel to Monroe
and Tappan Streets, it will connect to
the basement of the present law
library. An outside entrance will be
located on Tappan.
Because of the earth's insulating
characteristics, the underground struc-
ture will offer considerable energy
savings by cutting both heating and air-
conditioning costs.
Two skylights will supplement the
library's lighting. Some rooms will
have movable partitions so their size
can be altered.
DESPITE ALL the construction and
crawling, digging machines, particular
care is being taken not to destroy any of
the Law Quad's aesthetic qualities.
Stonework now carefully being
removed from the Quad will be saved
and reused in the new library to
recreate the original building's Gothic
appearance.

The new building will have a 200,000
volume capacity, which should
alleviate the cramped-conditions in the
present library. "We need at least that
much space," said Law Library Direc-
tor and University law professor
Beverley Pooley.
OTHER FEATURES will include ap-
proximately 300 carrels, microfilm
facilities, staff space, and offices -for
the Michigan Law Review and Journal
of Law Reform. An additional 15,000
square feet has been allocated as "raw
space" for future development.
Undergraduate students and law
students would be able to use the new
facilities. "We hope to be able to make
space to accommodate anyone with a
legitimate need for legal materials,"
Pooley said. "However, it will certainly
not be a study hall for the campus at
large."
In addition to the fuss about un-
derground features, planners have
provided for the overground ones. Ex-
tensive landscaping will be incor-
porated into the area where the parking
lot was, and marble slate walks will
traverse the area.

f rom

Sri Lanka

Thovil-exorcism by white magic-
is the second offering in this
season's Asian Series. Wearing
exotic masks the Sinhalese Buddhist
priests use ritual chanting, dance
and drumming to drive out demons

whose malevolence is thought to
cause disease. this authentic
troupe from Sri Lanka is on a nine-
city tour of the U. S. Tickets are
$3.50, $5 an $6.50 at Burton Tower.
Weekdays 9-4:30; Saturdays 9-12.
Telephone: 665-3717. 'i1

0

4H our Local Photofinisher"
" 4 HOUR EKTACHROME SLIDE

y' y;:

I

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