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February 25, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-25

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Page 2-Saturday, February 25, 1978-The Michigan Daily
c CITES LOCAL EXPERIENCE:

Church Worship Services

Levin bids for Senate

r r nr r r r nr r r r nnnnr r nnrnr nnnn rr
rr r rnt nn rr r

F~IRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students.
* * * ,
UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-IhO0 a.m.
at Howard Jonhson's
2380 Carpenter Rd.
Via l-a-Thought : 971-5230
Where people of all ages learn to ex-
press their inner potentials. For more
information call 971-5262.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
40995. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.

AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER AND
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron-663-9376
'O. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Paul Davis, Interim Ca mpus Minist'r
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
a.m.
Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
7:45 p.m.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday- isp.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Choral Evensong Sunday evenings at
7:00 p.m. at St. Andrew Episcopal
Church, 306 N. Division.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service
6:30 p.m.-Informal Worship
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 andi11:00 a.m.-Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
Fellowship and Dinner-Sunday,
4:00.
Seminar, William James-"The Va-
rieties of Religious Experience"-
Tuesday, 3:30. * * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7421
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Sunday Services at 10 a.m.,6 p.m.
Coffee hour-11:15 a.m.
i* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-10:30 a.m.{
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Christian Science Reading Room-
206 E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday;
closed Sundays.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: Historical Je-
sus/Risen Lord-9:30 am.
Tuesday Bible Study: History of the
Bible-7:30 pm.
Thursday evening Bible Study on
North Campus-8:00 p.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Lenten Service Wednesday,
7:30 p.m.

By KEITH RICHBURG,
Most Senate candidates rely on their
prestige as former Congressmen,
members of the state legislature, or
governors to get themselves elected.
Former Detroit City Council
President Carl Levin, a Democrat, is
seeking to break that tradition,
however. With his only election to office
being to Detroit's nine-member Coun-
cil, Levin is criss-crossing the state
telling voters that the problems he
faced in Detroit are identical to the
problems of such places as Escanaba
and Utica.
"I THINK I have something unique to
bring to the U.S. Senate," Levin said on
his Ann Arbor stop this week. "I have
experience on the local level. It's a
commonality I have with local issues."
Rarely has a city government official
attempted the quantum leap directly
into the Senate. Local politicians
typically are known only in their
hometown, and, in large cities like
Detroit, their interests tend to be too
urbanized to appeal to a range of
voters, especially in states like
Michigan with a large rural population.
Levin, however, is plagued with none
of the typical handicaps. His name is
known statewide, helped into notoriety
by the efforts of brother Sander, a for-
mer State Senator who lost two close

races to William Milliken for the gover-
norship. Levin's cousin, Charles, sits on
the Michigan Supreme Court.
AND LEVIN'S interests are far from
localized, his campaign theme concen-
trates on making the bureaucracy more
responsive to the localities.
"We have some federal programs
which are extremely important in this
country," Levin said. "Too often, these
programs don't work. We have to make
them work."
Levin said unless the local com-
munities make the federal social
programs work, they are in danger of
seeing those programs yanked away by
the federal government.
LEVIN ALSO finds his experience
dealing with the federal programs in
Detroit the best preparation to deal
with them on the other end - in the
Senate.
"I don't think we have anybody else
in the Senate who can bring this local
experience," he said. "I'm not kicking
the federal bureaucracy because a poll
says it's popular to kick the
bureaucracy. My feelings about the
way these programs operate ,come
from experience working with these
programs."
Levin tells a story about a young
unemployed Sanilac man who was

denied a job in a federal program
because he had not been out of work for
the requisite six weeks.
"THERE IS TOO little flexibility in
the implementation of federal
programs to meet local conditions,"
Levin said. "One of the things that hur-
ts is to have a jobs program that doesn't
work."
Levin's favorite campaign issue is
jobs, a popular point for any candidate
hoping to score in Michigan, a state
with high unemployment.
"We've got to do it any way we can,"
Levin said. "I'm very high on public
works programs. But on the other hand,
I'm in favor of private jobs. I think we
have to do everything we can."
Levin announced his Senate can-
didacy the same day incumbent Robert
Griffin announced his decision to seek
re-election. Levin said it was his duty to
announce "as a response to Griffin."cif-
f in."
Levin does not hesitate to level a par-
tisan barb against- the Republican
ticket. "They talk about this as a dream
ticket, it's more like a nightmare
ticket," he said. "You've got a gover-
nor who's tired of his job, a lieutenant
governor who said he never wanted to
spend another day in that office, and a
Senator who said he's tired and he's lost
his effectiveness and I think his
record's proved that."

Passage of amendments means
key changes in MSA elections

the ann arborfimnoop presents of MLB
Saturday, February 25 ROCKY
(John D. Avildsen, 1976) 7 & 9:15-MLB 3
SYLVESTER STALONE, scriptwriter and star, is Rocky Balboa, a battered South Philly
pug who gets a shot at the heavyweight championship. One of the most popular
films in recent years, winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture. With TALIA
SHIRE, BURT YOUNG, BURGESS MEREDITH. "It revives the old verities about the
American Dream and dignity, about the regenerative powers of love and self-
respect.. . ROCKY is simply a knockout."-William Gallo.
Plus cartoon: TO DUCK OR NOT TO DUCK (Chuck Jones, 1942)
BEATLEMANIA - MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR
(The Beatles, 1964-67) 7 ONLY-MLB
See John, Paul, George, and Ringo sing "Fool on the Hill," "I am a Walrus," "Your
Mother Should Know," and more in this extraordinary entertaining and funny film.
"Come with us now to that special place, where the eyes of man have never set
foot!" With the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Bond and other assorted freaks and oddities.
Also, rare early footage of the foursome in Liverpool, recording sessions with many
interviews, and the pandemonium that was Beatlemania.
8:40 only.
A FESTIVAL OF JAZZ SHORTS EMLB4
Award-winning shorts-some live action, some animation-with performances by
-THE jazz greats: BILLIE HOLIDAY, COUNT BASIE, DUKE ELLINGTON, LOUIE ARM-
STRONG, and BENNY CARTER. Swing. Be-bop and all that jazz!
(Robert Downey, 1966) C H A F ED ELBOW S 10:20 only-MLB 4
Walter Dinsmore's annual nervous breakdown begins shortly after he has a hyste-
rectomy and delivers $1800 in $10 bills (the result of swallowing a nickel as a
child). Psychoanalysis proves futile as our hero sees nothing wrong in being madly
in love with his mother. From the Prince (PUTNEY SWOPE) of satyrical underground
film. "A wonderfully cockeyed hallucination."-Vincent Canby

By MARK PARRENT
Radical changes in the'method of
election of Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) representatives will result due
to the passage of two amendments to
the MSA constitution by students Wed-
nesday.
Beginning in April, the MSA
president and executive vice-president
will be elected directly by students in a
campus-wide election rather than
being selected by MSA itself. Proponen-
ts of the plan say it will lead to greater
student interest in elections and will
"'also eliminate much of the political in-
fighting involved in the body selecting
its own president.
UNDER THE OLD Student Gover-

nment Council (SGC), the president
was elected by students, but three
years ago when MSA was created in
place of SGC, the planners decided to
make the president more responsible to
the Assembly by having the officer
selected by MSA.
The other amendment will change the
method by which representatives are
elected. Each of the University's 17
schools and -colleges will be entitled to a
certain number of representatives on
MSA depending upon the number of
students in the school. Only students
enrolled in a particular school may vote
for that school's representatives.
Schools will be entitled to one
representative for each 1,150 students
enrolled. Schools with less than 575
students will receive one represen-
tative, but those reps will have only
one-half vote in the Assembly.
THE PRESENT system is composed
of 18 at-large representatives and a
r presentative from each of the 17
schools and colleges. The school reps
are appointed by their respective
school governments.
The Central Student Judiciary (CSJ)
ruled this system improper because if
said it violated a section of the All-
Campus Constitution which guarantees
students "equality of the weight of the
vote." This was so ruled because the
School of Library Science, with a
relatively small enrollment, was en-
titled to one appointed representative

just as the Literary College (LS&A),
with a relatively large student
enrollment, was entitled to only one ap-
pointed representative.
A plan similar to the one passed by
students Wednesday was passed by
students in November, but CSJ ruled
the plan unconstitutional because some
of the smaller schools still had one
representative, although their
enrollments varied somewhat. The
justices objected because this did not
satisfy "equality of the vote" as it had
been defined.
JOHN GIBSON, sponsor of the plans,
thinks the problems with the old plan
have been corrected. CSJ chief justice
Thomas Potter apparently agrees.
"Right now I don't see any grounds to.
strike this amendment," Potter said
Tuesday night. "I see some minor
problems with it," he said. "I don't see
any glaring faults in it like the- other
plan had. We only wish MSA had done it
right the first time,"he added.
CSJ will hold certification hearings
for the election either next week or af-
ter spring break. The results must be
certified by CSJ before they become of-
ficial and binding.
THE PLAN ALSO calls for elections
only once a year rather than the
previous biannual elections. Supporters
say it will reduce election costs and
allow members to devote more time to
non-election matters.

Sundy. Fb ai, 3pA O(AC1C r
with zolton terecy - call in
de'oro*.. cr%4io4. f-o vr 3t'3,7?3-3S0OO
RISING STAR
the U of M
snd translation journal
Deadline for submissions
March 1
at HOPY/QOD ROOM
and444 MASON HALL
include name, moar, phone number

75 discuss Israeli
jailing of MSU pupil

Continued from Page 1)
ficials who have visited Esmail in
prison report that his health appears to
be "all right," Shapiro said.
At Thursday night's lecture, Sami's
U.S. lawyer, Abdene Jabara, insisted
that Sami's arrest was made possible
because of FBI intelligence reports
passed on to the Israelis. Jabara said
Michigan congressman Bob Carr (D-
Lansing) is conducting an investigation
into the role of U.S. intelligence
organizations in this case.
Carr has said even though member-
ship in the Popular Front is not a crime
in this country, there is "a U.S.-based
intelligence report" which may have
been given to the Israelis which says
Sami had contact with the terrorist
group.
Thompson Artments
furnished e icliencies
1 and 2 bedroom apartments
available for Fall 1978 occupancy
tocated at corner of
William and Thompson
call 665-2289

"Whenever it is known that someone
is a member of such an organization,
the name is circulated by intelligence
organizations through Interpol,"
Kyram said. He declined, however, to
reveal the name of the intelligence
agency from which the information was
obtained.
Israel maintains that Esmail went to
Libya two summers ago for training by
the Popular Front. However, Basim
Esmail said his brother was enrolled in
Ohio State University at that time.
The Esmail case has received
national attention in recent months.
One recent issue of Newsweek con-
tained a short article which touched on
the case.
The Detroit City Council unanimously
passed a resolution Wednesday calling
for the Carter Administration to in-
vestigate the case. The council's
statement said Israel's action con-
stitutes "a denial of fundamental and
universally recognized human rights."
In East Lansing, posters depicting
Sami Esmail are spread across the
MSU campus, and the case has become
the hottest issue on campus. A group
called the National Committee to
Defend the Human Rights of Sami
Esmail boasts 100 Lansing members.
An Ann Arbor chapter opened only
recently 'and sponsored Thursday
night's speeches.

SUNDAY 47E

/1

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