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February 24, 1978 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-24

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FRENCH
ELECTIONS
See Editorial Page

L~frII

1E34ai1

SCATTERED SNOW
High-- 280°
Low - 120°
See Today for details.

Vol. LXXX VIII, No. 121 Ten Cents
Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, February 24, 1978
10 Pages Plus Supplement

Lesbian t
'By PAULINE TOOLE
Oakland County Circuit Court Judge
Frederick Ziem denied the custody appeal
of an Ann Arbor mother, Margareth Miller, for
the second time yesterday.
Ziem originally denied custody for Ricky, 15,
and Jillian, 11, in Jupe because Miller is an
acknowledged lesbi n. Miller's attorney,
Shirley Burgoyne, took the case to the Court of
Appeals. In January, that court turned the case
back to the lower courts, instructing Ziem to
take the Child Custody Act more fully into ac-
count in his custody decision.,

itoter 's c,
THE CHILD Custody Act instructs the court
to mak custody decisions on the basis of the
ability of parents to provide financial security,
education, love and affection. Also included are
criteria interpreting the moral fitness of paren-
ts, the permanence of the family unit, the men-
tal and physical health of both parents, the
child's school record and the child's preferen-
ce.
Burgoyne charged Ziem had ignored those
criteria-particularly Jillian's desire to stay
with her mother-and made his original
decision solely on his reaction to Miller's

sexual preferences.
"The last time, I wa
was angry," said Mille
tion to the decision. "Y
dship it's causing me,t
my daughter."
MILLER SEPARAT
1972 and obtained a
children lived with her
when her husband br
against her. Jillian no
while Ricky lives with 1
Gayle Richardson,

custody appeal
s devastated, this time I teacher testified on behalf of Miller at the
r is discussing her reac- hearing. Richardson said from an educational
ou can't believe the har- and social standpoint, it would be damaging for
the hardship it's causing the child to be moved from her present en-
vironment.
ED from her husband in In his decision, Ziem referred to the child's
divorce in 1973. The preference. "There's no question she prefers to
for four years until 1976, stay with her r other." But, he said, "An
rought the custody suit eleven year old adopted child is not in a position
w lives with her mother to decide."
his father. BOTH BURGOYNE and Paul Miller's attor-
Jillian's fifth grade ney, Jim Hand, agreed there is no question

is denied
morality involved. "There is no moral question
here," said Hand. "That criteria does not apply
to this case."
The major area of contention involves the
"stability of Mrs. Miller's home. The mother
cannot offer stability," Hand observed. "Here,
is a girl in the fifth grade and in her fourth
school, the best interest of the children lie with
him (Paul Miller)," he said.
According to Richardson, Jillian Miller has
been enrolled in Dickens school for for years,
See JUDGE, Page 2

Coal strike effects
hit Midwest hard

From'Wire Service Reports
The spreading effects of the 80-day coal
strike reached the auto industry
yesterday, with two General Motors
plants in Indiana announcing one-day
furloughs of a total of 8,300 workers.
Meanwhile, Ohio, West Virginia, and
Maryland braced for power cutbacks
that seemed likely to bring more
drastic layoffs next week.
And officials of the Tennessee Valley
Authority, the nation's largest utility,
said the cutbacks could spread to it by
early March and lay off more than
100,000 workers in seven states.
MEANWHILE, pleas for voluntary
power-saving or orders for cutbacks not

drastic enough to affect jobs were in ef-
fect in a wide swath of states - from
Missouri and Illinois to Alabama,
Virginia and Maryland - that depend
on Appalachian coal.
Michigan residents are not conser-
ving as much energy as state officials
had hoped, but the picture is not as
bleak as it was last week because power
supplies have been increased through
other means.
Gov. William Milliken secreted him-_
self with officials of Michigan's utility
companies yesterday for an update on
the power situation and conservation
efforts.
DESPITE Milliken's television ap-

peal last Friday for conservation,
Public Service Commission Chairman
Daniel Demlow said energy consum-
ption has been cut by only about three
per, cent. State officials had hoped that
heightened conservation efforts would
reduce usage by 10 percent.
Demlow said, however, that he is
"somewhat more optimistic" than he
was last week because additional power
has been purchased from Canada and
several trainloads of non-union coal
have been secured.
The Canadian power - 3,000
megawatts - equals a full third of the
state's daily consumption.
PRESIDENT Carter kept alive hopes
See EFFECTS, Page 2

inds newr
home rig ht
next doors
The gleaming new firepoles and
freshly washed trucks all proclaimit's
moving day for the Ann Arbor Fire De-
partment. Hoses, trucks and men werey
transferred out of the old house - a
landmark since its construction in 1882
- right next door.
Fire Chief Frederick Schmid, left,
and Mayor Albert Wheeler, right, chat
during' a tour of the new facility last
night.
Official dedication is not slated until
late March. h
Daily Photo by JOHN KNOX

Chile regime charged
with repressive acts
By RENE BECKER said. It is particularly evident in the

ie

The most serious problem in Chile
today is the abduction of citizens who
resist the efforts of the government to
repress democracy and culture, said
Chilean exile Enrique Kirberg.
More than 2500 people have been
taken by the government, Kirberg,
former member of the supreme council
of the University of Chile, told a small'
audience in the Union Ballroom last
night.
"THE FATE of these 2500 people
remains unknown," he said. "The
government won't acknowledge the ab-
ductions despite testimony about the
government's responsibility for them."
The Piriochet regime in Chil
operates on the basis of fear, Kirberg

universitites where members of the
military government serve as ad-
ministrators, and help create an aura of
fear on the campuses, he said.
"The junta, wants to dominate the
minds of the youth," he said. Pinochet
realizes the universities were largely
responsible for Marxist President
Salvadore Allende's election. He also
realizes students are the base of strong
resistance to his regime, Kirberg said.
See CIHLE, Page 2

Kirberg

Both- issues pass in

Council passes new

porno law

By KEITH RICHBURG -
Amidst charges of election year
politics, a controversial new anti-por-
nography re-zoning law slipped through
City Council last night in a 6-5 partisan
split vote.
The pornography law is a watered-
down version of the stricter code intro-
duced by Louis Belcher (R-Fifth Ward)
last November.
THE NEWLY amended version,
which Councilman Earl Greene (D-
Second Ward) called "a 'political whip-

ping post," prohibits the establishment
of adult entertainment businesses
within700 feet of another adult business
or residential district.
The bill also prohibits such
businesses from allowing known
prostitutes or their customers to
frequent the premises. Known
prostitutes and known customers were
defined as anydwho have been convicted
of such in the last 24 months.
The prostitution clause and the 24
months definition came after heated de-

bate which touched on issues ranging
from First Amendment rights to
possible discrimination against women.
"IN ORDER to have prostitution you
have to have a customer," said Leslie
Morris (D-Second Ward). "Why are
you singling out one half and not the
other?"
Greene later called the 24-month
period, "arbitrary." "I can do better
than that in church. I can walk in a sin-
ner and walk out saved," he said. "I
don't see why a prostitute has to wait

for two years."
The vote came amidst charges of
election year politics and partisan
bickering. Greene accused the
Republicans of bringing up the sen-
sitive porn bill for political mileage
during an election year.
Gerald Bell, (R-Fifth Ward) likewise
accused the Democrats of using the
prostitution clause as their own
"political whipping dog."

specit
By MARK PARRENT
Both ballot proposals in Wednesday's
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA )
special election passed, according to
unofficial results released late lastI
night by special election director Tim
O'Neill.
Voter turnout for the one-day election
was one of the lowest ever, with less)
than 500 students voting. O'Neill at-
tributed the low turnout to many fac-
tors, including the cold weather.
THE FIRST amendment to the All-'
Campus Constitution will change the
composition of the Assembly to
representatives elected by students
from each of the University's 17 schools

1 election
and colleges. The number of reps from
each school will depend on the
enrollment of the school.
MSA is presently composed of acom-
bination of at-large and appointed reps
from college governments. The amen-
dment will also provide for only one
MSA election per year rather than the
previous twice annual elections.
The second amendment provides for
the direct election of the MSA president
and vice president by students, rather
than by MSA itself.
The results must still be certified by
Central Student Judiciary ( CSJ)
Illegal and improper votes still have to
be subtracted from the results,

{
I OO 1 1 I I I

State suit over PBB damages
'welcomed' by Farm Bureau

LANSING (UPI) - Farm Bureau
Services President Elton Smith said
yesterday a $119 million PBB-related
lawsuit filed by the state against his
organization will be contested hotly in
court.
Smith also said he welcomes the op-
portunity for a full disclosure of the cir-
Friday
Bulletin
The City Council last
night voted on a 6-5 par-
tisan split vote to

cumstances of the PBB farm con-
tamination disaster.
"PERHAPS SUCH an examination
will permit the general public to realize
that the true causes of the PBB problem
are more complex than is now widely
believed," he said. ,
The lawsuit is believed the largest
single civil action arising from the ac-
cidental contamination of dairy
animals, and subsequently Michigan's
general population, with the flame
retardant chemical PBB.;
Attorney General Frank Kelley filed
suit Wednesday charging the two firms

Bureau Services facility in Battle Creek
in 1973, touching off what Kelley
described as "the most serious instan-
ces of toxic contamination in history."
Smith said officials of the farmers
cooperative were "shocked that Kelley
felt compelled to seek millions of
dollars on the basis that we acted
knowingly, recklessly and purposely.
Nothing could be further from the
truth."
The lawsuit seeks recovery of all
state expenditures arising from the
PBB episode-including the costs of
testing milk and meat and removing it
from the market-as well as damages

Sharp
.
variances
in salary
disclosed
Although University officials have
taken a firm position against disclosure
of detailed faculty salary information,
The Daily has obtained in-depth com-
parisons between pay rates for some
LSA departments.
An unofficial 'U' survey for staff pay
in academic year 1976-77. The study,
released to The Daily early this month,
points to sharp differences between pay
rates of different departments.
The most extreme differences found
- n hti"aon ,hc "r. ndA ACtlp'grnnn

DEPARTMENT RANK

NO.

floW

MATHEMATICS Full

ASTRONOMY
PHYSICS
,PHILOSOPHY
LINGUISTICS
ENGLISH
ROMANCE

Associate
Assistant
Full
Associate
.Assistant
Full
Associate
Assistant
Full
Associate
Assistant
Full
Associate
Assistant
Full
Associate
Assistant
Full
Associate
Assistant

28,936.00
18,547.00
23,576.00
21,730.00
17,110.00
20,000.00
18,000.00
14,000.00
20,888.00
17,820.00
14,160.00
22,300.00
17,325.00
13,350.00
21,500.00
17,500.00
13,000.00

FACULTY SALARY DATA
FROM CONFIDENTIAL UNIVERSITY SURVEY

AVERAGE

HIGH

28,500.00*
18,100.00*
14,100.00*
37,702.00
19,963.00
31,491.00
22,963.00
19,090.00
23,000.00*

46,690.00
21,022.00
55,330.00
24,403.00
21,193.00
33,000.00
21,000.00
32,700.00
19,020.00
16,480.00
33,500.00
23,000.00
17,500.00

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