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January 10, 1978 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1978-01-10

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I

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, January 10, 1978=Page.9

27 POINTS PACE 6 9-65 VICTORY

Mc Gee comes of

By RICK MADDOCK
Michigan coach Johnny Orr sure is
happy he recruited a 6-5 forward
from Omaha, Nebrasha. After all,
Michigan needed a high scoring for-
ward, and if Sunday's 69-65 Wolver-
ine victory over Minnesota is any in-
dication, Mike McGee has filled the
spot.
McGEE LED Michigan to its
second Big Ten win in as many
games by scoring 27 points raising
his average to 17.3. Also, he crashed
the boards seven times and di-ew
three fouls on James Jackson to foul
the Gopher guard out of the game.
Even more to the freshman's credit
is that he played the final 8:38 with
four fouls.
The Gophers gave McGee the

chance to shoot because of their 1-3-1
zone defense. He took advantage of
the strategy and hit 11 for 17 from the
floor.
"McGee's a great shooter," said
Minnesota coach Jim Dutcher. "We"
were giving him good looks and he
was taking them. That's the gamble
you take when you zone. You gamble
that they're not going to make those,
and he made them.'
ORR HAS even more reason to
smile with McGee doing so well
against Minnesota. "The ironic thing
about yesterday was that McGee's
final two choices were Minnesota and
Michigan," Orr said.
"Those were the only two schools I
went to," McGee said. "I just liked
Michigan because they were the

age vs.
number oiie team, and I wanted to be
with a winner. Also, Minnesota was
on probation and I didn't want to get
into that."
There were other schools interest-
ed in McGee such as Kansas, Kansas
State, Nebraska, Missouri and
Creighton. Michigan assistant coach
Jim Boyce went to see McGee play,
and Orr went to Omaha twice.
"WE WERE THE number one
team and I was Coach of the Year. I
was invited to speak at the Omaha
All-City Athletic Banquet, so I did.
McGee was there," Orr said.
The biggest problem facing the
Michigan staff in recruiting McGee
was that his parents wanted to see
him play. "I think they're disappoint-
ed that they can't see him play more

Gophers
often," Orr said.
But McGee has found a bright spot
for this situation. "In a way, I'd
rather for them not to be there. Then
you don't have to worry about
playing well in front of them. It's on
your mind when they're there,"
McGee said,
HOWEVER, FOR any freshman a
long way from home, quite an adjust-
ment has to be made, and even more
so for a basketball player trying to
find time for studying in between the
rugged schedule.
"It's important when you get a kid
away from home like that that they
have a certain amount of success.
Because if they don't, then they want
to leave," Orr said.
Of course, McGee has had some
problems. "The only thing that's
been hard for me is you must play
'D', and it's harder to rebound,"
McGee said.
"THERE'S A LOT of pressure on
him," Or said. "There is a lot of
difference playing in high school.
You take the great players. They
have some problems adjusting. A lot
of times their weaknesses don't get
noticed, particularly if they're great
scorers.
"Now Michael never had to work
very hard, especially defensively,"
Orr continued. "The difficult thing is
to get a team concept. When they're
freshmen they don't have that."
In short, Orr evaluated, ''I
think if he continues to improve, he
has nothing but great things ahead of
him in basketball."

WOMEN'S GOAL: 130 POINTS
Tumblers aim to bust Broncos

Doily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
MIKE McGEE outscored Mychal Thompson (Minnesota player seen at far
left) 27 points to 23 which, coincidentally, was the margin of victory in the
Wolverines game last Sunday.
full court
f
VKPRESS
Cager victory.. .
. .intensity over height
By CUdl SCHWARTZ
There were a couple of intersting things which took place at Crisler
Arena Sunday afternoon in Michigan's 69-65 victory over highly regarded
Minnesota. One might single out Mike McGee for his brilliant shooting per-
formance, not to mention his rebounding late in the game and the way he
drew three fouls off James Jackson in only two minutes.
Then again, one might cite the play of Joel Thompson, who showed
tremendous strength on the boards in the second half along with some
crucial shooting.
But I think the most important aspect of the victory was the team
effort. Michigan used its talents to the fullest in overcoming some formid-
able advantages Minnesota enjoyed..
Height is the most obvious mismatch between the two teams. Minne-
sota's front line checks in at 6-10, 6-10, and 6-11 compared to Michigan's
6-8, 6-6 and 6-4.
Surely Minnesota should have dominated the boards with such an ad-
vantage. But the Gophers didn't. In fact Michigan outboarded them 31-28.
Now Gopher coach Jim Dutcher has a couple of reasons for this. First,
he says there is more to rebounding than just size-you need players who
are quick jumpers. McHale and Winey, he contends, are not whereas
Thompson and Hardy are.
I can swallow this explanation until I look at the final statistics.
There one finds McGee (6-5) with 7 boards, Staton (6-3) with 6 and Minnesota
monster Mychal Thompson (6-11) with only 3. Granted, Michigan's 1-3-1
defense cut down on Thompson's effectiveness but there has to be more
to it than that.
Dutcher reluctantly admitted the problem. "It's how high you play,
not how high you stand and some of our big boys didn't play very tall,"
he said.
-Therein lies the key to Michigan's victory Sunday. The Wolverines
were mentally perfect against the Gophers. They forced Minnesota's
mental errors into turnovers and converted most of them to points.
"If you are a championship team, when opportunities come you have
to take them," said Dutcher. If that is the case Michigan was truly a
championship team.
They showed a previously unfound discipline in running a patient
offense, looking for an open shot and then hitting it. And this discipline
is the key to beating a big cumbersome team like Minnesota. I was very
impressed.
Likewise the team spirit was crucial in the victory. A team attitude
is a tough thing to pin down-let alone write about. But there was an
electricity about the Wolverines as they huddled up after the player intro-
ductions. McGee looked higher than I've ever seen him before-and perhaps
this accounted for part of his spectacular performance.
Thompson, Hardy, Baxter and the entire bench showed similar enthu-
siasm. And of course Tommy Staton was there as always with the normal
intensity and spirit.
Sure the victory required more than team spirit. But in the big games
it is this factor which pushes you over the top. It turns one point losses
into one point victories and separates the championship teams from those
which have only talent.
Spirit has been given a good deal of credit in athletics. Notre Dame's
big victories, the domination of private schools in high school athletics ...
even Michigan's '75-76 cinderella basketball season.

By JEFF FRANK
The name of the game for the
women's gymnastics team is improve-
ment, as they open up the second por-
tion of their schedule against Western
Michigan tonight at the Coliseum, at 7
p.m.
Improvement that is, over the 122
points scored by the tumblers in last
term's meet against Eastern Michigan,
as well as over last year's top score of
127, registered in the Big Ten Cham-
pionships.
A season goal of 130 was established
for the gymnasts by their coach Anne
Cornell, but she is hopeful that the time
period needed to reach this goal can be
accelerated.
"We'd like to hit 130 by the MSU meet
for sure (January 22)," Cornell said,
"but we may need 130 to win our meet
Sunday (against Chicago-Circle)."
In an effort to reach this goal, new
tricks are being worked on by the tum-
blers to increase the difficulty of their
routines, and consequently to raise

their scores. The addition of full
twisting vaults by all-arounders Ginger
Robey, Mia Axon and Colleen Forrestel
shou'ld raise the scores quite a bit.
As is always the case in collegiate
gymnastics, the key to success of the
team is the performance of the all-
around competitors. Robey, Axon, and
Sara Flom, winner of four events
against EMU, return from last year's
team. Forrestel, a freshperson from
Akron, New York, adds a great deal of
scoring potential, with a strong dance
and acrobatic background.
The return of Flom from a disabling
knee injury which hampered her all last
season, strengthens the nucleus of the
team.
The all-arounders will be aided by
specialists Suzy Stanton, Linda Watson,
on uneven bars and balance beam, in-
jury hampered all-arounder Katie
Zobler, freshpersons Mitzi Miller and
Jane Neidhardt in floor exercise, as
well as Durelle Bechtel and Vickie
Ellison, both making their first ap-

pearances in tonight's meet.
Zobler and Neidhardt will not com-
pete tonight as a result of suspensions
handed out to them for reporting late to
practice after the semester break.
Vaulting specialist Suzy Stanton, who
serves as co-captain along with Ginger
Robey, sees "a tremendous amount of
improvement" on this year's team
compared to last year's. Stanton and
Robey feel that the increased team
spirit, better mental attitude, and more
intense concentration by the tumblers
will enable them to reach their goal.
"It's up to the individual to do well,"
said Robey. "The spirit is internal."

location
change
Tired of Michigan's long winters? Relocate
to California or Florida with the U.S. Navy
Nurse Corps. Senior B:S.N. Students are
eligible to apply.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL COLLECT
(313) 226-7795/7845

Women agers faee
Tartars, losing streak

By BILLY NEFF
"I wish I had a freshman like Mike
McGee," remarked women's basket-
ball coach Gloria Soluk as she philoso-
phized yesterday on her quintet's six-
game losing streak.
"WHEN WE PLAY certain teams,
it's like running into a buzz-saw with
the amount of recruiting they have
done; Michigan did very little last
year," Soluk noted.
"The incoming people are taking two
starting positions and we're playing
people with very little experience," she
added.
SOLUK ECHOED these sentiments
after suffering three defeats over
Christmas vacation.rThe women came
up short against Western Michigan, 82-
64 and Wayne State, 69-65, in the Motor
City Tournament. Ms. Soluk coached at
Wayne State last year.
In their most recent contest, the
women cagers were thumped by an ex-
cellent Ohio State five, 94-47. The Wol-
verines had lost previously to Adrian,
Eastern Michigan and Central
Michigan while upsetting highly ranked
Louisville in their only home contest
this season.

and rebounding, but the team shot a
woeful 24.6 per cent from the field and
thus endured their worst loss of the
season.
Meanwhile, Terri Conlin, who coach
Soluk says "is the most consistent per-
former on the court" for Michigan,
posted 14 points and 10 rebounds for the
youthful squad.
IN THEIR FINEST outing during
Christmas break, the women were
barely nipped by the girls Soluk
recruited for Wayne State as Currier
led the way with 20 points. Sheila Butler
added 14 and freshwoman Brenda Ven-
huizen clicked for 13 more.
The women face Wayne State again
tonight at Crisler Arena in the women's
''community night.'' The hockey pep
band will accompany the women's per-
formance as the squad will try once
again to knock off Soluk's old school.
Despite the women's misfortune,
Soluk maintains "I am having my
greatest year as a coach since I'm
teaching so much more than ever
before; they're (her team) the nicest
girls I've ever worked with."
Hairstyles
to please
tong or Short
DASCOLA STYLISTS
" 615 E. Liberty-668-9329
* 3739 Washtenw-971-9975
* 613 N. Maple-761 -2733
0 611 E. University-662-0354

Ski 'Venture
Cross. County Skiing
offers

5 GROOMED TRAILS
MOONLIGHT TOURS
LESSONS

o

GROUP PARTY RATES
STUDENT DISCOUNTS WEEKDAYS WITH I.D.
GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS:
CALL AND SCHEDULE YOUR EVENING NOW!

AGAINST OHIO State, Abby
tabbed both double figures in

Currier
scoring

LESLIE GOLF COURSE
C M
W m Pymr th Rd.

" ANN ARBOR
Open Daily
668-9011

Big 10 Standings

MICHIGAN... 2
Michigan State ... 2
Purdue .........2
Indiana .........I
Ohio State .......1
Iowa ...........1
Illinois.........1
Minnesota ......9
Wisconsin .......9
Northwestern .... 0

4
(i
(
1
1
1
2
2

Conference
1.0001
LOW41
1.000
.500
.5141
.509
.500
.40
.MOO
.0009

All fames
7 3 .7114
10 1 .5309
7 4 .636
9 2 .818
8 :3 .7'27
8 3 .727
7 4 .636
-1 6 .400
4 6 .4009
4 7 .364

'

LACROSSE
Mass Meeting

Lions fire Hudspeth
The Detroit Lions fired head coach
Tommy Hudspeth last night. Hud-
speth took over for Rick Forzano af-
ter the start of the 1976 season.

Tues., Jan. 10-8 p.m.
Wines Field Locker Room
(So. Division & Hill)
ALL WELCOME-UNDERGRAD OR GRAD/
EXPERIENCED OR INEXPERIENCED.

Washtenaw Community College & The University of Michigan
ENRICHMENT PROGRAM
Offering courses to enrich your personal life-
to supplement to your total college education
Last day for registration-Tues., Jan. 10, 1978

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS FOR 1978-79
INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS
MONDAY, JANUARY 16-WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1978
WEST QUAD-January 16, Monday, 7:00 P.M.-Dining Room No. 1
OXFORD-January 16, Monday, 7:00 P.M.-Seeley Lounge4
BARBOUR-NEWBERRY-January 16, Monday, 8:00 P.M.-Barbour Living Room
ALICE LLOYD-January 17, Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Pilot Office
COUZENS-January 17, Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Living Room
STOCKWELL-January 17, Tuesday, 8:00 P.M.-Main Lounge.
EAST QUAD-January 18, Wednesday, 6:30 P.M.-Room 126
noIna v___*.. q-12wfo nn l. AA A * WA~ a fd*etr

Basic Color Photography
General Photography
Typewriting
Drawing & Painting
Yoga
Basic Clay Experiences
Basic Ceramics
Basic Jewelry Making
Interior Design
Legal Rights
Common Rocks
International Cinema
Photojournalism
Comp: Song Writing
Guitar
Women and the Law
Saturday Mechanic (starts Jan. 14, for 6 weeks)
Tune-Up (starts Jan. 14, for 6 weeks)

Outdoor Garden Preparation
Ornamental Indoor Plants
Nature Photography
Black Woman
Modern Dance/Jazz Dancing
Consumer Economics
Science Fiction
Black Literature
Cultures of Latin America
Women's Health Care
Winter Field Studies
Swahili
Black Drama
Cabinet Making
Appliance Repair
Women Writers
World Literature
Growth Experiences for Women

1

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_'

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