100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1:

O F XEROX 9200 Copies
Specialists For Dissertations and Resumes
COLOR COPIES
Faculty: We Will Do Course Packs and Other Material

Page 2-Friday, January 6, 1978-The Michigan Daily

In the meantime

...

4

DOLLAR BILL COPYING
$11 CHURCH CALL Above Blue Frogge
ANN ARBOR 665-9200 EXPIRES 1/15
WE COPY EVERYTHING BUT DOLLAR BILLS

le

One-Year Pi

The
University of Chicago
M.A. Program in
Social Science

rogram

Interdisciplinary Study

-preparation for a new career in social or beha-
vioral science.
-mid-career advancement for working professionals
-background for further academic study in a variety
of fields.
Students formulate individualized study in urban planning,
philosophy of social science, delivery of health services,
industrial relations, problems of psychopathology, public
policy, international problems, cross-cultural studies, eval-
uatioh research, economics and many more areas.
-a distinguished faculty
-curriculum and career counseling
-hundreds of courses
-full and part-time opportunities
For information and application, write:
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS
FOSTER HALL BOX SR
1130 E. 59th STREET
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60637
Race, creed, color, sex, or national origin of applicants plays no role
in admission of any applicant to the University of Chicago.
RIAPHIC ORTS NT.NION 289
WELCOMES YOU TO ANN ARBOR'S
FIRST UNION COPY SHOP
The employees of Accu-Copy belong to G.A.I.U. local 289 and
won their first union contract for job security on December 11,
1977. The union workers of Accu-Copy unanimously ratified their
contract which contained the main objectives of the strike, job
security and a union shop clause and are anxious to provide their
expert services to you.
Show the world you are in support of the betterment of

(Continued from Page 1)
Council to get paid
City Council received a belated
Christmas present this week when
the Michigan Supreme Court re-
fused to hear an appeal charging
that Council's $5,000-per-year sal-
aries are illegal.
The ordinance providing for the
pay has stimulated heated argu-
ments ever since it was passed in
December 1975 because the City
Charter states that "Council
members shall serve without
-pay."
JIMMIE HUNT, a city resident,
brought suit against the city and
the Council challenging the ordin-
ance. Hunt won his suit in Wash-
tenaw County Circuit Court, but
the decision was reversed when
the city appealed. The Supreme
Court's refusal to hear the case
automatically lets stand the Ap-
peals Court ruling.
Lawyers for the city and council
argued that the salaries are legal
under a 1972 state law permitting
cities to enact measures which
contradict their own charters.
Councilman Louis Belcher (R-
Fifth Ward) said that while he did
not oppose Council pay, he felt it
should only be instituted through a
charter amendment approved by
city voters.
Parking plans
The city has begun considera-
tion of several plans aimed at
alleviating a severe parking short-
age. One plan may include con-
struction of a new parking struc-
ture at William and First Streets.
But because the parking business
is generally unprofitable, the city
may have a problem generating
revenue for the construction.
The shortage, according to
Carol Sullivan, director of Ann
Arbor Tomorrow, has been caused
by "a considerable growth in
employment" in the city in recent
months. The influx of employes as
a result of the completion of the
Federal Building, the Michigan
Square complex, and other down-
town renovations has caused
crowding in the city's parking
facilities.
THE 500 space structure would

not completely alleviate the prob-
lem. Sullivan suggested that the
city consider "pilot programs" for
people who don't use their cars
during the day. These programs
would include van service, car-
pooling, and increased use of the
city's bus system.
Old post office
purchased
After several months of acrobatic
fence-straddling, the Washtnew
County Hoard of Canvassers has
finally decided to join the city in
purchasing the old downtown post
office at Main and Catherine Streets.
But because of the delay in taking
final action on the resolution, the
city will be the sole buyer of the
property. Fifty per cent of the
ownership will later be transferred
to the county.
Sycor gets
tax break
City Council passed a resolution
on Dec. 19 that will grant a $30,000
property tax break to the Sycor Cor-
poration, a computer terminal com-
pany. The move was calculated to
encourage the company to expand
its Phoenix Drive plant and keep the
company from moving its headquar-
ters and plant operations out of the
city.
The resolution, which one Counil
member referred to as "an incentive
or blackmail, depending on which
way you look at it," will provide
Sycor with $340,000 over the next 11
years to cover expansion that will
add 10 to 15 employes to the city's
work force. ,
Calif ano speaks
Secretary of Health, Education
and Welfare Joseph Califano spoke
to 1,800 graduating University
students and their guests December
18 at winter commencement exer-
cises in Hill Auditorium.
Califano dwelled on the moral
questions raised by the advan-
cement of scientific knowledge. He
said the best way to answer the
questions is to rely on principles of
democracy rather than on leaders
"behind closed doors."

(Continued from Page 1)
"It's been a political football," said
Greiner. "We think it should be out of
that arena and in the City Charter,"
The coalition's proposal would have
tenant advocates, landlord advocates
and the city each write one-third of the
booklet.
THE "TRUTH in Renting" ballot
issue would set up misdemeanor
penalties for landlords who put clauses
in leases which violate state housing
laws or which are "deceptive."
In the First Ward, Republican incum-
bent Wendell Allen faces Democrat
Susan Greenberg in a traditionally lib-
eral area. Allen, a 30-year-old affirma-
tive action officer for the Hydra-Matic
company of Willow Run, scored an up-
set victory over Democrat Ezra Rowry
twoyears ago in his first Council race.
"I think (my chances) are pretty
good," Allen commented. "The last
couple years, people in the ward have
been given the kind of service from City
Hall that they hadn't been getting," he
added.
"I ANTICIPATE having to work very
hard," said challenger Greenberg, a 38-
year-old homemaker who has been ac-
tive in the Democratic Party for
several years.
The First Ward includes West and
South Quads, student rental housing, as
well as some more conservative resi-
dential neighborhoods.
Earl Greene, who is unopposed for re-
election in the Second Ward, said he
still plans to campaign and "get around
the ward on an informal basis."
Greene, 40, teaches music in the Willow
Run Public Schools.
THE SECOND WARD includes most
dormitory residents and few non-
students.
In the Third Ward, Republican Clif-
ford Sheldon takes on Democrat
Patrick Mitchell in a Republican
stronghold with few student voters.
"I think people are getting a little
more independent," Mitchell asserted.
"We expect to make some terrific in-
roads (in the ward)." Mitchell, 62,
works as a cable-splicer for Michigan
Bel. He is president of the Senior
Citizens Guild and vice-chairman of the
county's Comprehensive Health Plan-
ning Executive Committee.
"I PLAN TO get out and talk to a lot
of people," said Republican Sheldon,
who added that he is not taking the elec-
tion for granted. Sheldon, 35, works in
the Ann Arbor Bankaand Trust Com-
pany's commercial loan department.
In the Fourth Ward, ano area which
mirrors the city as a whole withy its
mix of students, and permanent
residents, former Democratic City
THE MICHIGAN DAILY DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 79
Friday. January 6, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Councilman Le Roy Cappaert will take
on the winner of the Republican
primary between Earl McIntyre and
David Fisher in what is expected to be a
close race.
"We don't want to hurt the party" by
a divisive primary race, commented
McIntyre, 29, manager of credit for
University Microfilms. "I'm fairly
liberal when it comes to social issues
and fairly conservative when it comes
to fiscal issues," he said.
HIS CHALLENGER, David Fisher,
32, works as manager of the audit
department for a savings and loan
company. The Daily could not reach
him for comment.
"I think the prospects are good," said
Cappaert, 54, who served on City Coun-
cil from 1964 to 1970.
"I've been intensely interested in
issues and service to the constituency,"
he said, listing housing needs as a top
priority in the ward.
In the Republican-dominated Fifth
Ward, an area with few students, Ded-
ocrat Joel Goldberg is running against
Republican James Cmejrek.
"THERE'S NO way to tell if there's
going to be a race in the Fifth Ward,"
said Cmejrek, 33, a local attorney.
Cmejrek managed the City Council
campaign of Fifth Ward Republican
COuncilman Gerald Bell last year.
Goldberg, 27, is manager of a local
clothing store and president of the
Pinelake Village Coop. He could not be
reached for comment.
Carter
receives
French
welcome
(Continued from Page 1)
Paris for a state dinner at the 17th
century royal palace of Versailles.
Carter returns to Washington to-
day, ending a seven-nation, nine-day
trip, after a stopover in Brussels,
where he will visit the headquarters
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organi-
zation (NATO) and the European,
Common Market and hold talks with
King Baudouin and Belgian officials.
Although France is a member of
NATO, it has not participated in the
NATO military alliance since the
mid-1960s.
MODEL MAKING
MYSTIC, Conn. (AP) - The art of
ship model making is the subject of a
new exhibit , - "Model Making
Today" - at Mystic Seaport.
The show includes 40 models that
range from 3-inch miniatures to
fully rigged, four-foot vessels. The
models range from clipper ships to
steamboats, schooners, skiffs and a
Japanese whaling sampan.

Tenants rights plans
to go on April ballot

Al
MINORITY STUDENTS
Housing Available for Winter Semester
Short informal discussion and presentation on
Cooperative living in the 1. C. C. Coops
South Quad, West Lounge
Sunday, Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m.
refreshments
For further questions contact Doug Beasley at 761-1058 or
the I.C.C. office 662-4414.

working people by
REMEMBER TO...

supporting our local union shop. AND

ASK FOR THE IANION

WA

EZ~

Qe? y ERAyQ4
0
T J
U Q0~Z

BEL 0 0 0

ALL SWEATERS
Men's & om
50% OFF

......... -

LOCAL 289
ACCU-COPY: 524 E. WILLIAM Street !!!
You will receive the finest quality copies at low prices, reproduced
by union workers who - have been in the photo-copy business
longer than any employees at any other copy shop in Ann Arbor.
Experience and the pride of union workers makes the
difference in the good service you will receive at ACCU-COPY.
For union made OFFSET printing KOLOSSOS printing at
310 E. Washington can serve your offset needs.

LEVI & LEE
CORDS
BELL & STRAIGHT LEG

12 99

ALL
OVERALLS

ALL FASHION

995
1000

ALPINE PRODUCTS is oz. FILL
POLARGUARD COAT
FABIANO PADRE
HIKING BOOT
30% OFF

Reg.$X61 39
7S
Reg. 38.50 2~
ALL
DRESSES
50 % OFF

ALL
FRAME
PACKS

ACCU-COPY: phone

769-8338 !!!

FOR QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE ON YOUR RIGHTS
UNDER LABOR LAW TO ORGANIZE WITH YOUR FELLOW
EMPLOYEES AND SECURE UNION REPRESENTATION; or for
any other information you may need:
CALL: G.A.I.U. local 289, Ph. 345-5965 (area 313)

5

!FANSCORDUROY
JEAN0SKIRT&
O 0 JUMPERS
0 OFFI
Irc1III III

ALL WHITE
PAINTER
PANTS

799

i iii /44* iii iii 00

II N ...u

nno hlnr'k wart

InL

I I

I' 1 1. 1 l ." mic ulutn nv*jti I;-- -

i

.

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan