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February 19, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-19

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 19, 1978-Page 7
Conniving campus cupids help
send kids to Special Olympics
By PAULA LASHINSKY response we got," said club member students. The club's major goal is to
Rita Mulheck. "We didn't make enough raise enough money to finan'ce the chil-
It proved to be one of the most pain- to cover all the children's travel ex- dren's trip to the Special Olympics this
ss wavs of raising moneV All the penses, but we have other projects star- summer.

le

ea wys gi llr, cuiy. rl Iy
asked was that people come and have a
good time.
The University Physical Therapy
Club sent out a call to all "conniving
cupids" to attend their all-campus
semiformal benefit dance for the Chil-
dren's Special Olympics.
AND COME they did. Over 250 stu-
dents paid the $2.50 ticket price and
came to the League ballroom to dance
to the sounds of Gabriel, a local band.
Proceeds of the dance, held Friday
night, will help send a group of Washte-
naw County children to this summer's
Special Olympics at Central Michigan
University.
The Special Olympics are an annual
event where physically and mentally
handicapped students meet and com-
pete in various sporting events.
"We aren't sure of an actual figure
yet, but we are very pleased with the

ted too."
The Physical Therapy Club, a cam-
pus service group, has made a year-
long project out of raising funds for
Washtenaw County special education
teacher Lynn Zander's class of physi-
cally and mentally handicapped
Mi WOH F ~NYE

"The club's efforts will help us pay
for putting the kids up in dorms at Cen-
tral," said Zander. "In addition, we
hope to be able to purchase new equip-
ment which will help us compete again-
st other groups."
SANS SOUCI
large furnished 1 and 2 bed-
room apartments available for
fall occupancy
Located across from U of M stadium
Bus Service every 15 minutes from
Hoover St. to State St.
call 995-3955
visit resident manager at
apartment K-1

February sunset Daily Photo by JOHN KNOX
Somehow during the winter months we forget to notice things like the sky-perhaps because it is usually filled with clouds.
But if we could stop looking at the tips of our boots meandering through snow drifts and over ice patches, we might just see
a sky as beautiful as this one.

The HRP: Still alive and well in Ypsilanti

(Continued from Page 1)
Lion like Ypsilanti when it fizzled out in
allegedly progressive Ann Arbor?
Jackson has the answer.
"There was always friction between
the Ann Arbor HRP and the Ypsilanti
coalition of leftists because there were
so many factions. At the University of
Michigan to be radical was chic; and
Ann Arbor was a hotbed for trend-
setting. People who follow trends are
usually from wealthier backgrounds,
but it's no longer fashionable to be
radical, he said.
Nicholson added, "In Ann Arbor the
HRP got to a point where there were
five caucuses that hated each other,"
he said.
JACKSON ALSO TOOK exception to
the common Ann Arbor conception of
Ypsilanti as being a redneck town. He
contends there is a strong radical tradi-
tion there which goes back to the days
of the Underground Railroad, when
black slaves used to stop off in Ypsilanti
on their way to freedom in the North-
west. He also noted the state commu-
nist party operated out of Ypsilanti in
the thirties and forties, and the current
chairman of Michigan's Communist
Party was born in Ypsilanti, and was
active in politics there.
Jackson and Baize were first elected
to the Ypsilanti City COuncil in 1974,
El- fI

and both won reelection in 1976. This
time they are running as part of a
Democratic-HRP coalition, and face
the Democratic primary elections on
Monday. Their compatriot Nicholson is
in the middle of his first term in office.'
All three councilmen enjoy
reminiscing about their political youth,
especially Jackson.
"THE YEARS AGO this month I was
in my first anti-war demonstration at
15," he said. His family moved to
suburbia U.S.A. from Panama when he
was 13, and he "didn't fit in." "So," he
says, "I quit school at 16 and lived in a
Weatherman Co-op." The Weathermen
were members of an extreme leftist
faction of the group Students for a
Democratic Society.
"I didn't go underground with the
organization," he continued. "They
weeded out 80 per cent of us, and I was
too young.'' His next large scale
political act was when ,he participated
in the East Lansing Cambodia Strike in
1970, where he was arrested for the first
time.
In December of that year he came to
Ypsilanti and worked on the un-
derground newspaper "The Second
Coming" (which Nicholson was quick
to ,point out was "not a religious
publication by any stretch of the
imagination). Less than a year later he
was again arrested for throwing

imitation blood at a Marine Recruiting
table.
"EVERYBODY got away but me,"
he moaned. "The judge asked me who
else was involved and I said I did not
know their last names. Then my attor-
ney stood up and said it was a common
sociological fact that hippies do not use
last names."
He was sentenced to 30 days in the
county jail, and probation which he
finished just prior to being elected to
Council in 1974.
Although his cohorts' pasts aren't
quite as colorful, they are no less
radical. Baize spent his early political
years working on environmental com-
mittees, cutting down billboards, and
participating in many demonstrations.
NICHOLSON made his political debut
in Flint at age 17, when he sat on the
Model City Council, a citizens' advisory
group. Recalling those days he said, "I
saw how ineffective administrative
bureaucracies were, and it really
irritated me."
He later led the Eastern Michigan
University student strike,; and even-
tually became chairman of the bargain-
ing chairman of the bargaining com-
mittee of the Eastern Clerical Union.
Although their branch is the only
viable faction of the HRP in the state,
the three councilmen remain optimistic
about a resurgence for the party.

"THIRD parties could be viable if the
left coalesced from its various fac-
tions," said Baize.
Nicholson said they were told that in
order to achieve a "realistic approach
and to remain an ongoing political en-
tity" they would have to assimilate
themselves into a major party. They
watched Tom Hayden's Senate cam-
paign in California in 1976 to see how
well he did as a leftist Democrat, and
they say they have attempted to follow,
the same course.
"We've come into a different realm
and our caucus is widely recognized as
a political power which must be dealt
with," said Nicholson. "The entire Yp-
silanti Democratic party went through
a restructuring this summer and we
have a substantial amount of weight
and impact in the party - we can't just
be shunned. Our politics are still essen-
tially the same, they're just phrased
differently."
Jackson added, proudly, "They
thought we were a flash in the pan like
Ann Arbor's HRP, but they've changed
the way they approach us, and so have
we."

HAVE A
-your friendly MICHIGAN DAILY STAFF

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