100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 18, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page 8-Saturday, Februar.y 18, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Local farmer says parity plea
needs support from Washington

By MARTY LEVINE
The main problem with the current
American farmer's strike is lack of
organization and a voice in Washington,
according to local farmer Ronald
Hesse, speaking at the Michigan
League yesterday.
"We got to have farmers atfederal
and state levels," Hesse emphasized.
THE FARMERS' goal is to get 100
per cent parity for their products; pay
equal to their costs and adjusted as
labor, machinery, and fertilizer prices
go up each year.
"We want to guarnantee minimum
wage, but we don't want to take sub-
sidization from Washington," Hesse
said. In order to get parity, farmers
must stop production, he added.
"The only place we can hurt people is
to take food away from them and that's
very hard to do," Hesse said. "We're all
individuals, scattered. I'm hoping that
this movement will draw farmers
together. "
HESSE SAID he and many other
farmers feel the recent farm bill passed
by Congress is a "disaster." Of the $11,
billion in the bill, only $1.9 billion is ac-
tually backing up the American farmer
and rancher. The other $9.1 billion is

being used for school lunch programs,
Federal Housing Administration
(FHA) loans and a $5 billion food stamp
allocation.
Hesse dismissed charges that 100 per
cent parity could force food prices up as
much as 30 per cent, calling them
"newspaper jargon."
"The middle man is the one who's
making the money," he said. The far-
mers say government pressure should

be transferred from them to cor-
porations handling the products bet-
ween farms and market shelves, Hesse
said. Those companies raise prices up
to 1,000 per cent, he charged.
Agricultural corporations are now
buying land, he said. "When (they) do
take over the farm land, they're going
to say, 'OK, Uncle Sam. This is what
you're going to pay for this food.' And
they're going to pay it, too."

Dorm rates hiked

*SPECIAL
at the
Bage! Factory
1306 S. University
INTRODUCING

ALWAYS FRESH,
7 days-..

(Continued from Page 1)
The University is developing access
plans in hopes of influencing a road
building project underway by a local
planning group.
Robert Warner, Chairman of the
Library Search Committee, told the
Regents the new Library Director
"must have much more administrative
and managerial skills" than he or she
would have needed even ten years ago.
"They must have a foundation in
technology" as well, according to War-
ner.
Among the ten criteria used by the
Library Search Committee were:
" understanding the mission of a
major research library;
* ability to provide leadership and
articulate the multiple responsibilities
of a major university library;
" commitment to affirmative action
and equal education opportunity, and
" personal style which will inspire
confidence throughout the University
community.
JOSEPH PAYNE, Warner's counter-
part on the Education Search Commit-
tee, said, "There has been a good deal
of emphasis on the personal scholar-
ship of the candidates." The criteria for
selecting the Education Dean are
similar to those for the Library Dean.
Payne stressed, however, the need for

"an energetic person."
In other business, the Regents rejec-
ted a motion by Regent Deane Baker
(R-Ann Arbor) calling, in part, for the
Regents to "challenge any person who
seeks to circumscribe the cherished
and vital right of this University to
govern itself."
Baker's motion was in response to a
recent University affirmative action
agreement with the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare. Baker
said the agreement is representative of
a more general attempt by the gover-
nment to control the University. He
said this has happened in the past with
disasterous results.
Rate hike for,
Detroit Edison
LANSING (UPI) - A $35.4 million in-
terim increase for the Detroit Edison
Co. was approved yesterday by the
state Public Service Commission,
despite opposition from Attorney
General Frank Kelley. The increase,
unanimously approved by the PSC, will
supposedly help Edison east its finan-
cial difficulties, which were caused by
increasing costs.

Our New
Cream Cheese Spreads:
strawberry-blueberry
vegetable-walnut
49C per sandwich
on your choice of bagel
(Good thru Feb. 28)
"Expert in Tray Catering"

The RFD Boys, a local bluegrass band, frequently strum away their Saturday nights at the Pretzel Bell.
Bluegrass: RFD.-s le

By DONNA DEBRODT
There's a lot more to bluegrass than handclapping,
toe tapping and singing along with the music, and there's
a lot more to Ann Arbor's RFD Boys than bluegrass.
The group commonly sprinkles renditions of oldies
from the 50s among its bluegrass ballads, slipping away
from the "mountain folks' music" just long enough to slip
in a few "doo, wop, vops" for a change of pace.
BLUEGRASS RFD-style is a mixture of classic
ballads, complex harmonies, intricate solos from each of
the bands four male members - all packed with emotion
and skill.
"If they didn't have other jobs and commitments,
they could go nationwide and be one of the top bluegrass
bands around," says Max Balden, manager of the Pretzel
Bell, where the RFD Boys spend their weekends twanging
away.
But the bands members do, in fact, have other oc-
cupations. Dick Dieterle, the fiddler and organizer of the
group, is a pathologist.
Charlie Roehrig works on his doctoral degree in
economics when he isn't writing songs for the group or
playing the guitar or mandolin.
Paul Shapiro, the bass player, has been known to
commute from Lansing, where he goes to medical school,
on weekends.
WHEN WILLARD SPENCER isn't building his home,
playing the banjo, giving banjo lessons or restoring old
cars, he could probably be found at the recording studio he
owns.
The RFD Boyshave already cut three albums at that
studio and are working on the fourth, they say. The
albums are simply named: RFD#1, RFD#2 and RFD#3.
The RFD in their name stand for "Rural Free
Delivery," a mail system designed for rural areas. "We
wanted something country," says Dieterle. "RFD ac-
tually began in Climax, Michigan. They even have a
monument to RFD up there."

THEIR BLUEGRASS following has grown from the
day of their first performance at Mr. Flood's Party eight
years ago. "Bluegrass has become a legitimate art form
here. Ann Arbor is a great town for introducing something
like this because of all the different kinds of people,"
Dieterle says.
In the old days, their music was played before such
audiences as the American Quarterhorse Association and
the FLint Classical Music Society.
"We were just trying for exposure, to have people listen
to us," Dieterle explains.
THAT'S NO longer the problem.
Spencer's banjo playing ranges from a sort of per-
cussion background to a front and center performance of
complex rhythms, leaping to notes with an intensity which
makes the audience stay on the edges of the seats.
In addition to handling the guitar and mandolin in-
strumentals, Roehrig also does the lead singing with a
sincerity which lends new credibility to old ballads.
SHAPIRO TAUGHT himself his slapping technique of
bass playing while watching other players at bluegrass
festivals. He also occasionally tries his voice at some
singing.
In the best of hillbilly fiddling traditions, Dieterle just
lets his bow do the dancing across the strings. Thelnotes
make the rattlesnake rattles on the fiddle shake just a bit.
Dieterle says the rattles are there to "drive out the evil
spirits."
Some might say their music is driven by some form of
unnatural spirits. "That was incredible!" says one
listener after a_ Dieterle solo. "It's amazing," says
another whenrSpencer finishes an improvisational solo on.
the banjo.
In between fast and furious bouts with the instrumen-
ts and the music, the boys take a comic breather and ban-
ter with the audience and among themselves. It's all part
of the stage ,shove which consistently draws standing-
room-only crowds to the P Bell on weekends.

MARTY'S... GOES DUTCH TREAT WITH THEIR THIRD ANNUAL ...

O

DUTCH AUCTION
SUITSr

NOW
THRU SATURDAY

REGULAR
PRICE
$135
$155
$165
$190
$250
$275

WEDNESDAYS
DUTCH TREAT
$109
$139
$141
$1 b
$224
$255

THURSDAYS
DUTCH TREAT
$99
$125
$135
$145
$209
$235

FRIDAYtS
DUTCH TREAT
$89
$109
$119
$129
$189
$215

DUTCH TREAT
$79
$89
$99
$119
$175
$195,

REGULAR
$85
$90
$110
$125
$165
$200

SPORT COATS
WEDNESDAY'S THURSDAY'S I'RODAY'S SATURDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT
$75 $65 $55 $45

$79
$99
$109
$149
$179

$69
$89
$99
$139
$159

$59
$79
$89
$125
$149

$49
$69'
$79
$109
$139

1

,.N

L A

CASUAL SLACKS 14
DRESS SLACKS
OFF
SWEATERS 1/
Ski and Cardigans
Fancy Wraps
Patterned Crews & V-Necks. OFF
others
Our pledge to you ....
Service, Sincerity, Satisfaction
American Express " Master Charge
Bank Americard

LEVI JEANS '
$9.62 Corduroy $9.62
And Other Styles
SPORT SHIRTS
OFF
EVERYTHINGFOR THE MANJ
+ANN ARBOR F LANSING

LEATHER COATS 1/2
LEATHER JACKETS
TOP COATS 1/2
SUBURBAN COATS OFF
310 SOUTH STATE, ANN ARBOR
Open Thursday and Friday 'Til 8:30
For easy access to Mortys New Rear Entronce, use the Maynard
Street Carport .Dve to the East side of the a4th floor or above Take
the elevator to the tst floor and out the exit to Mrtys. We
wsill gladly validate your parking ticket.

;U

Vi

Looking for that
Perfect Place?
Then check the
SUMMER SUBLET
SUPPLEMENT
appearing March 25

SNAKE-BIT YEAR
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - San Jose
State had a losing football season in
1977 after three successful ones. Coach
Lynn Stiles moaned about the misfor-
tunes that hit his club.
"Ten of our starting players under-
went surgery, Stiles said. "That
should have told me something but ap-
parently I ignored it. I invited my in-
laws to a game and guess what hap-
pened? Mr father-in-law tripped on the
stairs and broke a toe."
THE HIGHLANOS
1 and 2 bedroom apartments
includes security locsystem, drapes,
dishwasher', lighted tennis courts, and
pool
Buses to aqd from campus daily
1693 Broadway, Apt. 302
769-36,72
Reaume and Doddes Management Co.

Ann-

This summer you can study in Paris with Parsons School
of Design and earn nine academic credits.
The seven week program provides students with an
opportunity to draw upon the rich heritage of art and
design only lParis can offer A major resource this summer
will be The Ikmpidou International Center for the /arts'
the world's most exiting new museum. EIxcursions to
xoints outside I aRis are also part of the program. All
courses carry three credits and include Painting. Museum
I lai nt ini#. [)rawi ng. Visual Concepts. Fashion Seminar,
The Writer Among Artists. rench History. History of
Architecture. Interiors and i )ecorativu Arts. I [he Medi-
evalMind as seen in' I )o1atinesque and ( othic Architecture
and Sculpture. Academy and Avant Garde, and French
I Anguage.
The entire program. including nine studio and/or liberal
arts credits, round trip air fare, accommodations with
breakfast for seven weeks will cost $1,M).
For mare information and an application mail the:
coupon below or call (212) 741-8916..

.
"

14

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

e #.

"THE FOOL HATH SAID IN HIS HEART, THERE IS NO
GOD. THEY ARE CORRUPT; THEY HAVE DONE
ABOMINABLE WORKS, THERE IS NONE THAT DOETH
GOOD. THE LORD LOOKED DOWN FROM HEAVEN UPON
THE CHILDREN OF MEN, TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY
THAT DID UNDERSTAND, AND SEEK GOD. THEY ARE
ALL GONE ASIDE, THEY ARE ALTOGETHER BECOME
FILTHY (The margin In the King James Version says the
word here translated filthy is the Hebrew for "stinking!"):
THERE IS NONE THAT DOETH GOOD, NO, NOT ONE!"
This quote is the first three verses of the 14th Psalm, also of
the 53rd of The Bible, God Almighty's Book of Messages to
man.
The New Testament confirms this appraisal of the natural
man in Romans 3:10-12, as, indeed, do all The Scriptures
from Alpha to Omega, from the beginning to the end. We
need to be made "New Creatures" in Christ Jesus, and God's
"So Great Salvation" provides the means by which this can
happen to you: "Ask, and ye shall receive; Seek, and ye shall
find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you." Beware,
however, of trifling and fooling around profanely and
carelessly regarding your personal and individual relations
with The Almighty in your church vows and membershipl
in Isaiah 45:22-23, God says, "LOOK UNTO ME, AND BE
YE SAVED, ALL THE ENDS OF THE EARTH: FOR I AM GOD
AND THERE IS NONE ELSE. I HAVE SWORN BY MYSELF,

has affected our own great nation - until recent years
probably the most God-fearing and God blessed nation on
the earth. By their own testimony Russian officials are fools
in the sight of God, yet we gave them recognition a little over
forty years ago, and now this corruption has so spread in our
own land that we don't permit the recognition of God
Almighty in our public schools, but give license to fools to
teach our young the Russian devil doctrine that there is no
God, or "God is dead!"
Not only does God say that the fools who say there is no
God are corrupt, but, also "they have done abominable
works!" How guilty of the abominable works of oppression,
persecution, mass murder, and no telling what else! They
planned "abominable works" for many other nations and
have been very successful in bringing them about. They
planned "abominable works" for our nation, to bury us, to
pervert the clergy, upset race relations, infiltrating nearly
every phase of our lifel How successful they have been, and
how we have fallen for itI May God have mercy upon us!
"God's Word is true from the beginning, and every one of
His righteous judgments endureth forever." Psalm 119:160.
"Heaven and earth shall pass away, but My Words will not,"
said Christ, and the first recorded words of His after His bap-
tism was stamp of approval of all The Old Testament -* see
Matthew and Luke 4:4.
The following quote is from a Historian concerning the
anditionsabn.t the timen f the fal nf the Western rtionof

I

1 &,
,IV
#

I

f

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan