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February 17, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-17

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JUDGING THE JUDGES:

The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 17, 1978-Page 3"-

irYCU SEE E 7 M" CALL 7MY
Follow-up,
Ann Arbor police have ruled out any indications of foul play in the
death of 21-year-old Inteflex student Ronley Peisner, who fell to his
death from the eighth story of Burton Tower at approximately 3:40
Wednesday afternoon. While it is not general police policy to label any
death a suicide, Ann Arbor police have said they consider the case
closed. Peisner's roommates indicated he had been in a period of
espondency before the fall took place. A high-ranking University
security, official stated that Peisner had a history of psychiatric
treatment, and said, "If this hadn't been the Burton Tower, it would
have been some parking structure, or a tall building somewhere
else . . . let's just say that this was one that was destined to happen."
The alumni connection
Having connections never hurts, or so it's said. The folks at the
University's Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations want to find
out if that's true, so they've launched a pilot program to determine
whether students with alumni "connections" are more successful in
their job-hunting efforts than those without that benefit. The "Alumni
Network" matches students interested in particular careers or
geographical areas with knowledgable alums. Interested persons can
pick up applications and further information in 1210 or 1223 Angell
Hall, the Student Counseling Office or Career Planning and
Placement.
Happenings ..
. ..apportez votre dejeuner and head over to the French
Colloquium in 5208 Angell Hall to hear Yale Prof. John Merriman
speak about "Social and Political Consequences of Rapid Urban
Growth: The Case of Limoges". . . or attend a noon luncheon at Guild
House, 802 Monroe, where members of the Chicana Seminar will
present "The Women Prison Project" . .. food seems to be the order
of the day, so work up your appetite again for Burmese cookery,
demonstrated by Mimi Khaing and ThiThi Ta at the International Cen-
ter Lounge at ... at 4, farmer Ron Hesse will speak about the farm
strike issue, in the library, of the Michigan League. . . chow down yet
again at 5:30 at a campaign dinner for the four democratic guber-
natorial candidates at Leopold Bloom's restaurant, 118 W. Liberty
things are calm until 8, when Thomas Hilbish leads the Chamber
Choir in the works of the Bachs - J. S. and P. D. Q. - in Hill
Auditorium ... or make the trek to Ypsilanti to hear the Democratic
gubernatorial candidates square off for the first time this year to
discuss the issues at Cleary College, 2710 Washtenaw . .. or head over
to MLB Aud. 3 for the Astronimical Film Festival. There'll be short
space shuttle films, a movie called "The Search for Life" and a lecture
by Jim Loudon on "Viking Report 5" ... put on yer fancy duds and fox
trot over to the Michigan League Ballroom for an all-campus semi-
formal to benefit the children's Special Olympics ... wind up the day
with a party in honor of the busy Democratic candidates for governor
at 621 Church. Whew.
On the outside.. ..
On an average Feb. 17 Ann Arbor could expect a high of 35 and a low
of 19. But not this year. The weather pattern seems determined to keep
the state in the icebox for at least another 72 hours. Our weather folks
tell us to anticipate a high of 20-23 and a low of 11-14. Occasional snow
flurries will add some excitement.
the n arbor film cooperative presents
Friday, Saturday, Sunday, February 17, 18, 19
The EgAmAMor 8MMFm Festl
choring Audtorium, School of ductiodn
8mm filmmakers from all over the U.S. and Canada will compete for $1000 in cash and prizes, given by
an awards jury for excellence in the growing field of 8mm. Friday shows at 7 and 9 and Saturday shows
at 2, 7 and 9 all different. On Sunday at 7 and 9, the prize-winning films will be screened.

Group sets eyes on local courts

By MARTHA RETALLICK
If you're accused of a crime in
Washtenaw County, you can rest
assured that someone will be in court
watching to see that your rights are
upheld.
I "Everyone is entitled to a public
trial, and judges do a better job when
they're watched," said Margaret
O'Connor, Director of the Washtenaw
County Court Watching Project.
THE MONTH-OLD project not only
benefits those on trial, but is also inten-
ded as a "form of education" for the
participants. "At some time we're all
going to be in court," O'Connor said.
She explained that the Washtenaw
County project is modeled after other

successful programs around the coun-
try, most notably the one in Oakland
County which began in 1975.
Court watchers sit in on a wide
variety of Washtenaw Circuit Court
proceedings. They have viewed both
civil and criminal cases, both judge and
jury trials. The only sort of trials they
do not watch are grand jury
deliberations, which are closed to the
public.
WHILE THEY observe, they fill out
questionnaires which ask everything
from whether the judge spoke loudly
enough to wnetner they thought justice
was carried out.0
After about 200 to 300 questionnaires
come in, O'Connor said the project will
summarize the response and give them

to Chief Circuit Judge William Agar.
Agar will then review them and make
any "appropriate" changes, she said.
So far, about a dozen homemakers
have done the court watching, O'Con-
nor said. Local high schools as well as
Eastern Michigan University have ex-
pressed interest in the program, she
added.
WE WANT everybody to be a court
watcher at some time," she said.
The Washtenaw County Court Wat-
ching Project is not funded by county
taxpayers. Instead, its money comes
from a private organization called the
Citizens' Committee on the Circuit
Court.
So far, the court watchers have not
turned up any glaring judicial errors in
the county circuit court. The few
questionnaires court watchers have
turned in are "mostly positive," she
said.
HOWEVER, O'Connor remembers
hearing of one Oakland County court
wather who observed a trial in which
the judge listened to the proceedings
with his eyes closed. That court wat-
cher, like several other people in the
courtroom, thought the judge had fallen
asleep.

'Erervone is entitledt 1a
public trial and jIudges do,
a better jol achen iliey rt-
being lc aelu'.I
-Margalre t o'(: o t-
W ahing 'ro j hi
Direct(or

Daily Official Bulletin

TONIGHT!
Gergoyle films presents
Where Ea le Dare
star mg
Clint Ess/wood
Ricksard Burton
Shows at78 10,pm
Room 100 Hutchins HalI
(Law Quad)
ADMISSION $ 1.00

i1''

Friday, February 17, 1978
DAILY CALENDAR
Guild House: 50t soup and sandwich luncheon,
"The Women Prison Project," representatives from
the Chicana Seminar, 802 Monroe, noon.
Ctr. SSEAS: Carolyn Copeland, "Some Monastery
Paintings in the Ladakh," Commons Rm., Lane Hall,
noon.
Music School: Chamber Choir, all-Bach program,
Hill Aud.,8 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
:3200 sAB-- Phone 763-4117
National Music Camp, Interlochen, MI. Will inter-
view Tues., Feb. 28 from 9 to 5. Openings include
nature, arts/crafts, waterfront (WSI), athletics,
cabin counselors. Register by phone or in person.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXviII, No. 115
Friday, February 17, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109:
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription -rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

W.R. Grace & Co., Columbia, Maryland. Summer
Intern Program, must have chemical background
and a year of studytowardan MBA. Further details
available.
Summer Intern Government Programs available
to undergrads and grads. Various agencies covers
fields of drug abuse, mental health, research analyst
in Gerontology, poli. science majors, admin. and
tech. openings. You must study these on your own.
Camp Echo Lake, New York Cord. Will interview
Thurs., Feb. 23 from 1 to 5. Openings include ar-
ts/crafts, waterfront (WSI), nature, tennis, dance,
cabin counselors. Register by phone or in person.
Camp Tamarack, MI. Coed. Will interview Tues.,
Feb. 21 and Mon., Feb. 27 from 9 to 5. Openings for
counselors, specialists, kitchen staff, nurses,
caseworkers, and bus drivers.
Blue Lakes Fine Arts Camp, MI. Coed. Will inter-
view Thurs., March 2 from 9 to 5. Openings include
waterfront (WSI), recreation dir., archery, cabin
counselors.
Nippersink Manor Resort, Wisc. Will interview
March 1 and 2--Weds., Thurs. from 9 to 5. Openings:
waiters, waitresses, recreation staff, maids, kitchen
help and many others. Register in person or by
phone.
The driest spot on earth is the Ata-
cama Desert in Chile where the rain-
fall is barely measurable, according
to the National Geographic Society.

WOODY ALLEN'S 1972
EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER
WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX
(BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK)
With this film we have a director who is clearly inspired by his subject matter.
Allen's hilarious lampoon of Ruben's book will not only answer questions you
were afraid to ask but others only Allen could think up. Color.
SAT: THE STORY OF ADELE H.
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH.AUD.
CIN EMA GU ILD T:00 &9:O5 $1.50

MEDIATRICS
RETURN OF THE DRAGON
Bruce Lee's last performance is unquestionably his best. He
meets Chuck Norris in a fight to death. Lee's own particular
magic sets this film apart from all others.
FEBRUARY 17th 7:30 and 9:30
AN EVENING OF CARTOONS
All your favorites folks! -An excellent selection featuring:
Road Runner, Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck and others ...
FEBRUARY 18th 7:00, 8:35 and 10:10
NAT SCI AUD

ADMISSION $ L.00 per show
FridayFebruary 17
RAYMOND CHANDLER FESTIVAL
THE BIG SLEEP

COMING WED.

*

SOUNDER

MLB 3

(Howard Hawks, 1946)

7 & 9:15-MLB 4

BOGART was Chandler's favorite screen Marlowe, and it's easy to see why as he wisecracks his way
through this brilliant Howard Hawks film. Marlowe is hired by an aging, wealthy patriarch to in-
vestigate the possible blackmailing of his younger daughter. Marlowe begins to uncover motives for an
old friend's disappearance and is led to the patriarch's older daughter, Lauren Bacoll: -I like that, I'd
like more.' Screenplay by William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett and Jules Furthman. With ELIJAH COOK.
JR.. MARTHA VICKERS, DOROTHY MALONE. Plus Cartoon: THE BIG SNOOZE (Robert Clampett. 1945).
Without doubt, the weirdest cartoon in American animation. Bugs enters the dream of Elmer Fudd and
turns it into a super-nightmare. °'Clampett is Mr. Bizarre. Its as it the director of CALIGARI hod
dedicated his life to Porky Pig." -Captain Cartoon.
Saturday: 8th Ann Arbor 8mm Film Festival continues.
Herzog's Every Man For Himself and God Against All-MI.8 3

C

DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thOu SAT. 10 A.M. t1 1:3u P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon 0i1 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25

J

5

TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtime.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 mninutes
" after showtime.
''" 1:15
ROBBINS 700
LAURENCE OLIVIER KATHARINE ROSS 9 30
R ROBERT DUVALL
The Mouse and Her Child105
"A DELIGHTFUL SHOW FOR CHILDREN"
STEVEN FLYNN U.A.T.C. 4:15
as ... th ...30*
5j~~4I9:15
RTMf1.LTm uva

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