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February 14, 1978 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-14

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Page 12- T;sday, February 14, 1978-The Michigan Daily
SAiD T) EETS WITH POPE:

JERUSALEM (AP) - Prime Min-
ister' Monachem Begin reaffirmed
yesterday that the hotly contested
issue of Israeli settlements was open
for negotiation and he welcomed

Begin
resumption of U.S. mediatio
Mideast conflict.
Egyptian President Anwa
meanwhile, capped his eigi
bid for international political
with a meeting at the Vati
Pope Paul VI. The pope url
international guarantees beI
for Jerusalem's holy places
future settlement..
BEGIN WAS IN a con
mood at a news conference yE
after sharply criticizing U.S.
policy on Sunday.
Apparently underlining h
ingness to bargain, Begin co
a weekend report by Israe
that his government has hE
expansion of Sinai settlem
did not elaborate. Israel was
criticized by Egypt for its
decision to "strengthen"
settlements by increasing t
and population during peace'

willing to discuss Sinai settlements
n of the The radio said Defense Minister ton news conference Friday, called tween Israel and Egypt. cials and a delegation of Europea
Ezer Weizman halted the bulldozers on Israel to disband its settlements Atherton undertook the mediation, Jews, led by Nahum Goldman
r Sadat, that were leveling ground for new and withdraw from Arab lands won shuttling between Jerusalem and former president of the World Jewi
ht-nation houses at settlements in northeastern in the 1967 war. He also endorsed Cairo, after Israeli-Egyptian politi- Congress. Goldmann told reporte
1 support Sinai. Begin's confirmation came in creation of a Palestinian homeland. cal and military negotiations broke the Jewish leaders expressed suppo
can with answer to a question. Begin told reporters his peace plan down last month. The U.S. envoy for Sadat's peace initiative.

pan
in,
sh
rs
irt

ged that
provided
s in any
ciliatory
esterday
Mideast
is will-
nfirmed
Ali radio
alted its
ents. He
sharply
Jan. 8
existing
heir size
talks.

" HOWEVER, the prime minister
left the impression Israel will fight
any move to disband settlements. He
said all Israel political factions,
except the minority Moscow-aligned
Communist Party, opposed removal
of the outposts.
At its weekly Sunday meeting,
Israel's cabinet accused Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance of "taking sides"
against Israel in Mideast mediation.
Begin said he did "not regret one
word" of the unanimously adopted
cabinet statement, which was his
eight-month-old government's sharp-
est criticism of the Carter adminis-
tration.
VANCE, SPEAKING at a Washing-'

includes a demand that Israel retain
a score of settlements in Sinai after
the peninsula is turned back to
Egypt. But he added:
"As I always repeated, my friends,
everything is negotiable except the
destruction of Israel . . . our peace
plan is negotiable, with all its
details." Begin said the "differences
that have a'risen over Mr. Vance's
statement have not annulled our
positive attitude toward Mr. Ather-
ton's effort . . . "He is a desirable
guest in Jerusalem."
ASSISTANT Secretary of State
Alfred Atherton is due here next
week,to renew efforts to work out a
declaration of peace principles be-

returned to Washington two weeks
ago to be on hand for Sadat's meeting
with President Carter.
Agreement has been reported on
several clauses of the declaration,
but Israel and Egypt are believed
divided on the question of Palestin-
ian rights and the extent of Israeli
withdrawal from Arab lands.
BEFORE LEAVING Paris for
Rome, the final stop on his tour,
Sadat told reporters that Atherton's
shuttle was the only avenue open to
peace and that direct Israeli-Egyp-
tian negotiations could not resume
unless agreement was reached on the
peace principles.
In Paris, Sadat met French offi-

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Sadat
Cut South
Africa
ties, Diggs
urges 'U'
(Continued from Page 1
"For them (the University) to with-
draw (divest) would have a great
psychological impact," he said. This
impact, according to Diggs, would be
felt by other institutions-, confronted
with the same question who would be
influenced by the University's decision.
DIGGS ALSO urged American
corporations to withdraw from South
Africa. He added both economic san-
ctions and boycotts of South African
goods to the list of actions which would
be used to facilitate change there.
He discounted any adverse effects
these actions might have. Diggs said
some people "worry about hurting
those people we are trying to help.
That's a fallacy in the South African
context," he said.
According to Diggs, the number of
people who would lose their jobs as a
result of American corporate with-
drawal is inconsequential compared
"to the 18 to 20 million blacks who are
already suffering."
THE ISSUE of South Africa holds im-
portant implications for blacks he said.
Blacks must learn to use their political
force to effect American foreign policy
toward South Africa just as the Jews
have been able to effect policy in the
Middle East, Diggs added.
After his speech, Diggs took part in a
panel discussion with history Prof.
Harold Cruse, and political science
Prof. Joel Samoff.
At the panel discussion, Cruse rein-
forced Diggs' point that Afro-
Amer'icans must involve themselves in
U.S. foreign policy. "Black people don't
have their own foreign policy on South
Africa," complained Cruse. "They are
echoing other peoples' policy on Africa.
"UNTIL AFRO-AMERICANS are
willing to be involved in South
Africa-to the extent that some are
willing to emigrate there as part of a
foreign policy-there won't be any
policy," he said.
Samoff stressed that corporation
executives-the very people who would
be hurt by disinvestment-are influen-
cing foreign policy in South Africa.
"It's not just that these corporations at-
tempt to influence American gover-
nment policy in the way you or I might
(by writing to a congressman). They
are themselves the ones who are ap-
pointed to the positions that are making
the decisions."
He said U.S. investments, especially
toward manufacturing and advanced
technology, are increasing. "South
Africa is based on racial
discrimination," Samoff added. "Per
petuation of this state is dependant on
the United States."
Diggs, in response to a question from
the audience concerning organization
and financing of foreign policy in South
Africa, said, "We need an African lob-
by-we don't have one.

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