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February 12, 1978 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-12

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Page 10-Sunday, February 12, 1978-The Michigan Daily

ThompsonAprtments
furnished eficiencies
1 and Zbedroom apartments
available for Fall 1978 occupancy
Located at corner of
William and Thompson
call 665-2289

Smokers kicking habit
(Continued from Page 1) 75 per cent success rate one year after
programs used as class assignments, intervention.
Powell culled the literature to come up COMPLETION OF the program often
with a successful program. gives the participant new attitudes and
Powell practices the aversion a positive outlook on life, Powell said.
therapy he teaches. He keeps an elastic "In a week's time you will have more
band strapped to his wrist to zap him- stamina and more endurance," he in-
self when he gets the urge to light up. sisted. "People are proud to quit
Smoke Stoppers currently reports a smoking."
Peer pressure, which used to en-
courage cigarette smoking, now prods
many people to quit, Powell said. And
$29 , as more of the hazards of smoking are
THE AVERAGE COST revealed, more people want to stop.
POWELL SAID advertised "step-at-
OF A CAB RIDE, a-time" approaches do not help persons
permanently break the cigarette habit
because they fail to treat the
YOUR FRIEND'S LIFE. psychological aspects of smoking.
Low-tar cigarettes are also useless,
For free information, write to: Powell remarked.
DRUNKDRIVER,Box2345 "The only safe cigarette," he said,
Rockvilleh Maryland 20852e y s' s k
"is the one that hasn't been smoked."

TRAVEL TO ISRAEL
ISRAEL INFORMATION SERIES
B'NAI B'RITH FOUNDATION is sponsoring Orientation Sessions for travellers to Israel for
either the Summer, Year, Study Abroad of Kibbutz.
THE SESSIONS ARE:
MONDAY, FEB. 13 - Israeli Culture and Society
All about the people of Israel, the land, Jerusalem, kibbutz life, etc. UGLI Multi-
Purpose Room, 7-8:15 pm.
MONDAY, FEB. 20 - How to Survive Your Stay in Israel
Passport, visa, I.D., money, where to stay, transportation, where to eat, what to pack,
etc. At Hillel, 7-8:15 p.m. Special Guest, YEHUDA BERMAN., Israel Aliyah Center.
For further information, please call Hillel 663-3336 {
The No. 1 Rock-n-Roll Disco y
737N. Huron~
(at Lowell, just east of the E.M.U. Campus)
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
MASQUERADE
TUESDAY-Valentine Day Party
;'K Disco Between Sets
Saturday Night Fever Dance Contest
WEDNESDAY-Drinks Special
THURSDAY-Drink & Drown: rock bottom prices
Ladies Night 1/2 off cover
See our DYNAMITE DISCO LIGHT SHOW!!! "It's the best"

W l w ayDaily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
The Sam Rivers Trio and the Leroy Jenkins Trio offered an evening of "post-avant garde" jazz Friday night
at the Power Center. See review, Page.
DEREK ULA TION COMVPR OMISE FAILS:
Gas price ceilin g sticks

WASHINGTON (AP)-It was to have
been the week that finally saw a break
in the long congressional deadlock on
natural gas price controls, but predic-
tions of a fast-approaching compromise
proved wrong again.
Last week began with optimistic
statements, but ended with no com-
promise in sight on the question of lif-
ting government controls on natural
gas prices, the thorniest part of
President Carter's energy program.
SENATE members of the conference
committee, which is trying to resolve
differences with the House over bills
passed by both chambers, did come

close to compromising their own wide
differences. They came so close that
Sen. Henry Jackson (D-Wash.), the top
Senate energy negotiator, thought for a
time that he had the votes in his pocket.
And warmed by Jackson's optimism,
President Carter was telling
congressional leaders at mid-week that
the long impasse should be ended
within a few days.
Well, it didn't happen. Carter's op-
timism showed unfounded, Jackson's
pocket turned out to have a hole in it
and as the week ended, the gas.
deregulation debate that has so long
defied resolution remained unsettled.

Michigan Premiere of the Highly Acclaimed Film
GPAY USA
The Politics of Celebration
GAY USA is intended for gays and straights. For lesbians and gay men
the film is a joyous document of the demonstrations/celebrations they
marched in or watched. It is a catalyst-helping all gays come out for
their constitutionally-guaranteed Human Rights. GAY USA encourages
gays to become more vocal, more visible, open. Straight people learn
about gay life in a positive non-threatening situation;
MONDAY and WEDNESDAY
February 13th and 15th-7 and 9 p.m.
Modern Languages Building
Lecture Room 1
FREE ADMISSION
Co-sponsored by the Gay Academic Union and the Residential College. Funded with the help of
LSA Student Government and the Lesbian Advocates Office.

.JACKSON'S behind-the-scenes
manuevering in search of a winnable
compromise provides a study in
frustration, the frustration that had
dogged the dispute over federal price
controls on natural gas for over two
decades.
Jackson and other key participants in
the energy negotiations give this ac-
count of why things fell apart:
After weeks of closed-door
bargaining, Jackson framed a "com-
promise" intended to satisfy both
backers of Carter's plan for continued
price controls and the senators
clamoring for deregulation who have
blocked all past efforts at compromise.
THE PROPOSAL, with the tacit
backing of the Carter administration
and of top House energy conferees
whose support is vital, called for
deregulation by 1985-with the right of
either the president or Congress to
reimpose controls for a single two-year
period.
Under that plan, between now and
1985, the maximum price allowed for
gas could rise by 3 percent annually
above the national inflation rate.
The proposal would mean higher gas
bills for consumers than the president's
proposal-several hundred doljars
more through 1985 for the average
family living in a gas-heated home, ac-
cording to qne consumer group. But
Jackson claimed it would cost far less
than the Senate-passed bill calling for
deregulation in two years.

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