100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 11, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Saturday, February 11, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Church Worship. Sevices

Mikva calls for stronger
U.S. human .rights drive

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
Fellowship and Dinner-Sunday,
4:00.
Semi'nar, William James-"The Va-
rieties of Religious Experiencd"-
Tuesday, 3:30.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Lenten Service Wednesday,
7:30 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL--A Campus
J.Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7421
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
SundayS'ervices at 10a.m., 6p.m.
Coffee hour-11:15 a.m.
Just for the
health of it*
Get moving. America!
Physical Education Public Information
American Alliance for Health
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 16th St N W Washinqton D C 20036

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Christian Science Reading Room-,
206-E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday;
closed Sundays.
* * *
UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-11:00 a.m.
at Howard Jonhson's
2380 Carpenter Rd.
Dial-a-Thought: 971-5230
Where people of all ages learn to ex-
press their inner potentials. For more
information call 971-5262.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service
6:30 p.m.-Informal Worship
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Thursday evening Bible Study on
North Campus-8:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Choral Evensong Sunday evenings at
7:00 p.m. at St. Andrew Episcopal
Church, 306 N. Division.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER AND
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron-663-9376
0. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Paul Davis, Interim Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
a.m.
Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
7:45 p.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students.
* *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-10 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus-9:30 a.m.
ME IGHANS
1and 2 bedroom apartments
includes security lock system, drapes,-
dishwasher, lighted tennis courts, and
pool
Buses to and from campus daily
1693 Broadway, Apt. 302
79-3672
Reoume and Doddes Management Co.

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
Claiming it would benefit - both
pragmatic and moral causes, Illinois
Congressman Abner Mikva yester-
day said the United States must
assume an active role in the human
rights struggle around the world.
"As long as human rights remains
a struggle, so will peace be a major
struggle," Mikva said.
THE ILLINOIS Democrat's re-
marks at Rackham Auditorium offi-
cially concluded the week-long sym-
posium on human rights in Russia
and Eastern Europe.
Mikva, presently serving his fourth
term in Congress, praised the Carter
administration for its well publicized
support of the human rights struggle.
"For the first time in many years
there is a moral basis to our foreign
policy. Although it is not being per-
fectly executed, it is still our clearly
stated policy," said Mikva.
MIKVA ATTRIBUTED the basis of
Carter's strong policy to a signifi-
cant rise of morality in the United
States.
"Carter responded well to the
public's desire for a tough human
rights policy. People want to hear
about government fighting for good
things again," he said. '
Mikva said he believes the United
States has begun to realize its demon-
stration of physical aggression in
different areas of the world has failed
to achieve good results in interna-
tional affairs.
"WE'VE USED our muscle and we
haven't received what we've wanted.
So we've decided to show good will
and sensitivity, which should under-
line our future human rights initia-

tives," he said.
The congressman also listed basic
human rights which have been
denied in many countries.
"Nations who claim to be civilized
have imposed restrictions on the
right to emigrate," he said.

backward," Mikva said.
He praised Congress-for its recent
increase of support for human rights.
He said Congress has begun to insist
on only selling military equipment to
countries aiding the cause of human
rights.

'For the first time in many years there is a
moral basis to our foreign policy. Although
it is not being perfectely executed, it is our,
clearly stated policy.'
-Illinois Rep. Abner Mikra
mg1

HE ALSO SAID the individual's
right to freedom of religion is
curtailed in many countries.
"The unfailing commitment "to
social justice is a long topic in this
country," he said.
Mikva did, however, admit the
United States has failed in many
countries to improve the situation of
human rights.
CITING A RECENT report by
Amnesty International, an organiza-
tion which received the Nobel Prize
for its effort in supporting human
rights, Mikva said the United States
has "slipped in many countries in its.
support for human rights."
"A lot has happened, but for every
step forward, we've taken two steps

"CONGRESS MUST not short-
change its ideas in any policies it
carries Qut," he said.
The Illinois congressman repeated-
ly issued his support for the Jackson
Amendment, which restricted U.S.-
Soviet trade because of human rights
abused in the Soviet Union, calling it
a "moral and decent policy."
"The Jackson Amendment had
more to do than anything else in
lessening tensions between Russian
authorities and Jews; and getting the
Helsinki Agreement signed," he said.
He also described the Jackson
Amendment as the major policy
which showed the Soviet Union "we
mean business in our human rights
policies."

SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS
Manufacturing Data Systems, Inc., a rapidly growing Ann
Arbor firm, involved in the development, production and marketing
of high technology computer products and services for manufactur-
ing applications, is looking for Systems Programmers to work on
the following projects:
- PASCAL COMPILER
- Mini-Computer Operating Systems
-interactive Graphic Design System .
- Data Base Management System
Applicants should have a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better, programming ex-
perience and CCS 573, CCS 575, CCS 476 or equivalent. Those
qualified and interested in a challenging growth-oriented oppor-
tunity should sign up for Wednesday, Feb. 15, 1978. Interviews
at the Career Planning and Placement Ctr.
Manufacturing Data Systems Inc.
4251 Plymouth Road
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105
An Equal Opportunity Employer-M/F

Suit charges police negligence

(Continued from Page 1)
is based on state law which says fire
arms may be used in a felony case only
if "all other reasonable immediate
means to make the arrest have been at-
tempted and have failed." The policy
further requires firearms be used only
if the arrest cannot be made otherwise.
Mayor Albert Wheeler said when the
possibility for a suit came up about two
weeks ago he was'approached by Ed-
wards' attorney and asked about the
possibility of settling without a trial.
ACCORDING to Wheeler, the City
Council gave a "strong but not
unanimous consensus not to authorize
I
Pedal.
Just for the
health of it.
Get moving, America!
Physical Education Public Inormaton
American Alliance for Health.
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 16th St N W Washington D C 20036

the city attorney to settle out of court."
Larry Edwards and Robert Bullock
reportedly entered the combination
service station-convenience food store
two yzars ago intending to rob it.
EDWARDS apparently simulated a
gun with a finger in his pocket. A ser-
vice station attendant managed to call
police.
When officers Pressley and Anderson
arrived on the scene, Edwards and
Bullock juiped through a broken store
window and fled. The officers gave
chase and yelled for the youths to halt.

Patrolman Pressley fired first at Ed-
wards and missed.
Both Pressley and Anderson then
fired, their shots hitting Edwards in the
head and neck. Edwards died- nine
hours later at St. Joseph Mercy Hos-
pital. Bullock was also wounded in the
chase and was arrested later.
In 1975, Krasny said his men had "ac-
ted within the scope of the law in the
apprehension of a fleeing felon."
Krasny and Anderson refused to
comment on the pending case. Pressley
was unavailable for comment.

MS president to
lobby for tax c redits

DONT WAI TOATE-SUBLET IOW
Print or Type legibly in
Sbthe space provided,
1I
j upplemnentthe copy as you would
like it to appear.1
(ACTUAL SIZE OF AD) I
I NAME
I ADDRESS
I 1
I PHONE _
1 Mail or Bring in Person with payment to:1
420 MAYNARD STREET
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: THE MICHIGAN DAILY1
1 1
SbefONLY $8 bor5:OOP.m.March3,1978 1
U ~ ($10 from March 4 to March 20) I

I.

(Continued from Page 1)
plan," said Lauer. He also said the
federal bureaucracy can hardly
handle the financial aid programs
now, and this would just add to the
confusion and waiting times of the
agencies.
"The tax credit plan does have its
drawbacks," Lauer noted, but he
said he thinks it is the best alterna-
tive for students now.
Lauer promised to take a "realistic
attitude" in his presentations. He
plans to ,relay students' desires for
financial relief without getting into
arguments over the possible "nega-
tive broad social consequences" of
the plans, although he will ac-
knowledge downfalls of the plan. He
emphasized his main purpose is to
represent student views.
MICHIGAN STATE University stu-
dent government has been a main
organizing factor in involving stu-
dent governments in the lobbying
efforts.
MSU will be sending a delegation,
and CMU, WSU, and UCLA will be
represented in Washington largely as
a result of the coordination of MSU
student body president Kent Barry,
according to Lauer.
SOUTHARICA:
Implications tbr
0lack Americans
Monday, February 13
1:30 - Congressman Charles Diggs
*Lecture at Schorling Aud.
School of Education Building
3:30- PANEL DISCUSSION
Prof. HAROLD CRUSE
Dept. of History /CAAS
Prof. JOEL SAMOFF
Dept. of Political Science /CAAS

Laier:- 'We definitely have
reserrations of the tax credit
... (but) we feel' at this time it
will benefit the sttidents of the
University of Michigan.'
Lauer says he plans to make a full
report to MSA upon his return to the
University next week.
Lauer added that he hopes to form
a MSA legislative lobbying com-
mittee modeled somewhat after the
MSU committee. Access to more
money has made it easier for MSU to
develop such a program, Lauer said.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXVIII, No. Ito
Saturday, February 11, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan.. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan