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February 09, 1978 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1978-02-09

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Page 8-Thursday, February 9, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Matmen crushed by top teams,
head for MSU grudge match

DEFENDING BIG TEN CHAMPS HOST REDSKINS:
Netters face tough debut

By GEOFF LARCOM
Bill Johannesen and his Wolverine wrestling team are
-just glad it's all over.
Having not wrestled competitively since Jan. 21 (due
to snow-related cancellations), Michigan journeyed
west, taking on Iowa State, Iowa, and Minnesota on con-
secutive days last weekend.
Iowa State and Iowa are rated one-two in the nation,
while the Gophers rank third in the Big Ten, behind
Wisconsin and the Hawkeyes.
The result: ouch.
The Cyclones and Minnesota both topped the
Wolverines by scores of 38-6, while Iowa handed
Michigan a 43-6 defeat.
Coming off the two week layoff, the Wolverines were
hard-pressed to keep up with the superbly conditioned
Iowa contingents.
"No doubt, the layoff hurt us," said coach Johannesen.
"We've got a lot of work to do. We need to be quicker and
improve on our conditioning. Right now, the intensity
just isn't there in some cases."
In other cases, it is definitely present.
Sophomores Steve Fraser (177), decisioned NCAA
runnerup Tom Press of Minnesota and Greg Stevens of
iowa, while sophomore heavyweight - Steve Bennett
dominated Gopher Jim Becker in winning 12-7. Along
with Mark Churella, they constituted the Wolverine win
slate for the weekend.
"Fraser should be the number one seed at 177 in the
Big Ten Meet," said Johannesen. "He is probably our
best conditioned athlete. He never stops coming at you."
Defending NCAA titlist Mark Churella won two of
three matches. His 10-9 loss to Dan Zilverberg of Min-

nesota was only the second setback he has suffered this
year.
Fears of a Churella slump were dispelled however,
when he defeated Dave Schulz of Oklahoma on monday,
in the Coaches East-West All-Star Meet at Lancaster,
Pa. Schulz is rated by Johannesen as the finest freshman
wrestler in the country. "He could easily win the NCAA
four years in a row," said Johannesen, who coached the
East team, "That was one of Mark's finest matches."
For Churella, the toughest chore, was simply getting to
the meet, Flights into Lancaster were cancelled due to
snow conditions. He was forced to take a fifty dollar taxi-
cab ride from Philadelphia Airport to Lancaster (70
miles away), in order to make the match on time. A local
paper stated, "Churella should be voted most valuable
wrestler for just showing up."
The Wolverines tangle with Michigan State at East
Lansing tomorrow night, in a revenge opportunity for
Michigan. Johannesen feels the 24-18 tally can be rever-
sed this time if the wolverines can win two or three key
matches.
Karl Briggs will have his hands full at 150 with Dennis
Brighton, while johannesen hopes for a victory at 142
from Bill Evashevski, who goes against Spartan Jeff
Therrian.
If the Wolverines are to have any degree of success in
the remaining dual meets against State and Wisconsin
next weekend, the lower weights must begin to score
points.
"Due to the injuries, it's been tough to generate
momentum in the lower weights," said Johannesen.
"Oor guys get beat up the first five matches, and then
Briggs (150) had to reverse the momentum. That's not
easy to do."

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
If tennis season is here, can spring
be far behind?
Yes, that's right, tennis season is
underway. This Saturday at 7 p.m.,
the defending Big Ten champion
Michigan men's tennis team enter-
tains the highly-regarded Miami
(Ohio) Redskins in the Tennis-Track
Building.
IMPROVING upon a 16-3 record is
an almost impossible task, but
Michigan coach Brian Eisner is
confident thatchis squad is deeper
and more talented than last year.
"Last year at this time we were
forced to start four freshmen, and at
times they showed theirsinexperi-
ence," said Eisner. "This season,
these men have matured, and their
play will reflect this maturity."
ANCHORING THE Wolverines are
returning lettermen Jeff Etterbeek
and Jud Shaufler. Etterbeek, last
year's number one singles player,
placed second in the Big Ten in
doubles this past season and is vastly
improved. He is coming off a
commendable performance in an
indoor tournament in Houston, where
he defeated defending Big Eight
singles champ John Staub. I
Shaufler, like Etterbeek, has fared
well in national competition. Last

season, Shaufler won the number two
Big Ten singles championship, and
during the summer captured a
sectional tourney.
Other returning netters include:
co-captains Brad Holland and Ollie
Owens (the only seniors on the
team), Jack Neinken, Steve Solys,
Rick Garcia, and Gary Grant.
EISNER INSISTED that his fresh-
men are the finest he has worked
with in his nine years at Michigan.
This year's prize recruit was Matt
Horwitch, a two-time Illinois high
school champion. Horwitch, from
Chicago, earned a position on the
United States National Junior Davis
Cup team, one of only eight players in
the country to hold this honor.
Another outstanding freshman,
Ihor Debryn, "has more quickness
and mobility than anyone I've ever
coached," beamed Eisner. He also
praised the dedication of first-year
players Andrew Halpern, Sheldon
Katz, Dan Saperstein, and Peter
Osler.
Osler, a product of Ann Arbor
Pioneer High, returns home after
spending two years at the University
of Indiana. A junior transfer, he is
eligible for play this season.
MICHIGAN seeks its tenth consec-

U,."

utive Big Ten crown, and Coach
Eisner is confident that his team will
again be highly respectable. It will be
difficult to equal last season's mark,
however, as a number of national
powers will invade - Ann Arbor this
spring (winter?). Besides Miami,
Notre Dame, Kentucky, and Division }
Two champion Southern Illinois (Ed-
wardsville) should provide stiff com-
petition.
This weekend's match against
Miami should be an interesting af-
fair. Michigan defeated the Redskins
8-1 last year in an exhibition. After
that embarrassing loss, Coach Steve
Strome's cr-ew proceeded to win the
Mid-American Conference, the fifth
straight year they have done so.
THE REDSKINS' chances of re-
taining their championship declined
with the graduation of Steve Kendall,
who represented the Midwest at the
NCAA tournament. They do retain
some fine performers in MAC singles
champ Craig Wittum and Rob Gard-
ner, who lost to Michigan's Neinken
last year.
Saturday evening's contest is the
season opener for both teams. Al-
though a non-conference match, it
should give Coach Eisner and Wol-
verine fans a good indication of
what's in store for Michigan tennis in
1978.

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COUPONI

By JEFF FRANK
When women's gymnastics in the
Big Ten has been mentioned, tradi-
tionally two schools have stood out
from the rest of the pack, Illinois and
Michigan State.
However, this year's Big Ten meet,
to be held this weekend at Iowa, casts
a slightly different appearance to
pre-meet observers: a balanced
meet with three or more teams in
position to win the crownon a good
day.
Minnesota, boasting the services of
former Olympian Colleen Casey, the
odds-on favorite for the all-around
title, has in one year leaped from the

second division to a possible cham-
pionship.
In women's gymnastics, the addi-
tion of one outstanding performer
can make a tremendous difference in
a team's scoring potential, and
Minnesota has registered the highest
scores of any Big . Ten school this
season.
Of course, one shouldn't feel sorry
for Michigan State or Illinois. Michi-
gan State is still considered the team
to beat in the Big Ten. The superior.
depth of the Spartans, who have
averaged 133-135 this year, is expect-
ed to make up for Casey's expected
36-38 point all-around score.

'SkiVenture
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Defending champion Illinois, mi-
nus graduated all-around champion
Nancy Theis, dropped a dual meet to
Minnesota earlier this season, but on
a good day can be expected to
challenge for first place.
And then there's Michigan. Michi-
gan? Didn't they just establish a
team three years ago? How can they
be mentioned as a possible competi-
tor for Big Ten superiority?
While it is unlikely that the
Wolverines can pull off a major upset
by topping Michigan State and
winning the title, they could easily
surprise a lot of people and sneak into
second or third place.
Coming off their finest perform-
ance in history [133.75 vs. Kent St.],
the tumblers are healthy, well-rested
after several lay-offs, and excited at
the chance to compete in the Big
Ten.
"The Big Ten is a very classy
meet, it's very well organized," said
Wolverine coach Anne Cornell. "Do-
ing well in it does a lot for a team's

ish hih
reputation,'it gives us a c ance to
improve other's opinions of us."
The women's championship differs
from that of the mens in that it
doesn't act as a qualifying meet for
any later meets. Qualifying is done
on a state basis in women's sports, so
the Big Ten is more of an honorary
meet.
Cornell feels that the team has a
good chance for third place, but
admits, "I wouldn't be disappointed
if we took first or second."
Top performances by Michigan's
all-arounders, Sara Flom, Ginger
Robey, Mia Axon, Colleen Forrestel
and Katie Zobler are necessary for a
high finish. They can also eye the
medals given to the top six individ-
uals in each event.
With two days in Iowa to work out,
plus the inspiration gained from last
weekend's high score, Michigan
State and Illinois just may have to
make room at the top of the Big Ten.

5 GROOMED TRAILS
MOONLIGHT JOURS
LESSONS
GROUP PARTY RATES

-.

STUDENT DISCOUNTS WEEKDAYS WITH I.D.
GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS:
CALL AND SCHEDULE YOUR EVENING NOW!
FREE COFFEE & DONUTS:
SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNINGS FROM 8 TO 10

Department of Romance Languages
summer Study Prorams
in
SALAMANCA, SPAIN
and
tA ROCHELLE, FRANCE
INFORMATION MEETINGS
Thursday, February 9-5:00 p.m.
Modern Languages Building
SPAIN-Lecture Room I
FRANCE-Lecture Room 11

THIRD STRAIGHT LOSS:
L.A. dumps Pistons

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By BOB EMORY,
Special to The Daily
DETROIT-After getting off to an
unusually slow start, the Los Angeles
Lakers hit on 16 of 21 shots, giving them
a 46-41 lead that they relinquished only
once en route to a 105-95 drubbing of the
Detroit Pistons before 6,930 quiet fans
here last night.
THE PISTONS led after one quarter,
23-14, but then Lou Hudson and Tom
Abernathy found their mark and the
Lakers chipped away and finally took
the lead with three minutes left in the
half.
Detroit went out in front, 63-62, late in
the third quarter and looked like they
Uof M
SKI CLUB
MEETING
7:30 p.m. Feb. 9
At The
Henderson Room
Michigan League
EVERYONE WELCOME
Discuss Weekly & Weekend Trips f
Call 665-7917 forI
further information

might do more as Kareem Abdul-
Jabbar picked up his fourth foul. But
some hot outside shooting from Norm
Nixon kept the Lakers in front for good.
HUDSON AND JABBAR paced the
Lakers with 27 and 22 points respec-
tively. Adrian Dantley added 14 and
Nixon pumped in 15 to lead a balanced
scoring attack.
Bob Lanier, fighting off the flu and
some early foul trouble, led all scorers
with 31 points and 16 rebounds. John
Shumate had 13 and M.L. Carr had 11
points as the Pistons lost their third
straight game.

SCORES

y

NBA
Los Angeles 105, DetroitB95
Philadelphia 117, New Orleans .104
NHL
NY. Rangers 3, Minnesota 0
College basketball
Duke 100, Virginia 75
UNCC 72, St. Francis, Pa. 63
Western Michigan 74, Ball State 63
Toledo 78, Eastern Michigan 72
Central Michigan 69, N. Illinois 67

GREEK NIGHi
Admission Free with proof of
membership in a frat. or sorority

tj 1,

TONIGH

Tat DORM NIGHT
. Admission Free with a meal card
SECOND CHANCE
Appearing Thru Sunday:
mu~sv'at

j
t
i

I

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