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February 08, 1978 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1978-02-08

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4

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 8, 1978--Page 9

WOMEN SUFFER FIRST HOME DEFEAT

BGSU clips women cagers, 61-60

By ELISA FRYE
In the final minutes of a see-saw
battle, Bowling Green University's
women's basketball team pulled a vic-
tory out of the hands of the Wolverines,
scrapping by with a score of 61-60.
The game was close the whole way,
with Michigan never leading by more
than eight points (that being in the first
half) and BGSU never leading by, more
than four. The end of the first twenty
minutes saw the Blue cagers struggling

to hold a two-point lead, 28-26.
In the second half, the scoring kept
going back and forth as each team took
turns in command of the lead. Then, in
the final two minutes, the Falcons in-
ched ahead with a four-point lead, 60-56.
The Wolverines came right back,
spurred on by baskets from Abby
Currier and Sara Smolenski. A free
throw by BGSU's Charissa Urbano
gave the Falcons the victory.
The loss to Bowling Green was the
women's first at home. "We've been

lucky at home. If you can't win at home,
where can you win?", commented
coach Gloria Soluk. "I would have liked
to take a victory to the Big Ten tour-
nament," she added.
Soluk attributed part of the reason for
the loss to center Abby Currier's
sprained ankle. Currier saw limited ac-
tion, but contributed nine points to the
Wolverines' effort.
"We just didn't play good," explained
Soluk. "We lost because we played

BLUE SENIOR TIMED IN 34 SEC. FLAT
Grace sets new 300-meter mark

lousy. It had a lot to do with Abby being
hurt, but, I think the other players
should learn to rise to the occasion."
Senior forward Terry Conlin was on-
ce again the star as she led the team
with 22 points. Denise Cameron added
in 14 points. Former starting forward
and sophomore Karen Gilhooley missed
action since she has quit the team.
The Falcons' scoring outburst was
led by senior forward Bobbi Little with
10 buckets, followed by senior center
Laura Maczko with 16 points and junior
forward Charissa Urbano whotallied 14
points.
This weekend, the Wolverines will try
to come up with some victories as they
travel to West Lafayette to participate
in the Big Ten tournament. "Maybe this
(last night's loss) will wake us up for
the tournament," said Soluk of the up-
coming tourney. The cagers will face,
Illinois, whom they defeated last
weekend, 81-76, in the opening round on
Friday.
The team returns home to Crisler
Arena on Tuesday, February 14, to
meet Calvin at 8:00.

By KEVIN ROSEBOROUGH
A track that rings an ice rink in a London, Ontario
hockey arena seems hardly the place for a world record
to be set. But the locale suited Michigan senior James
Grace quite well, thank you.
GRACE OVERCAME the less than ideal conditions to
burn off the fastest 300 meters in history on an unbanked
200-meter or 220-yard track. His fleet 34-second flat
clocking at the Western Ontario Invitational last Satur-
day shaved two tenths of a second off the existing
record.
"All I was really trying to do was
win the race," he confessed. ".. . I
just couldn't believe it."
Grace ran against a field that included the previous
record holder, Eugene Thomas of Eastern Michigan,
and teammate Charles Crouther. He credited the good
field and his training as a quarter miler with giving him
the strength to run such a good race. "
"I got out hard at the start of the race," Grace said,
"and tried to maintain it. I kicked as hard as I could

when I hit the middle of the last turn, for about the last 60
to 80 meters.
. "The 300-meter is a gutsy race because it is 328 yards
long," the Wolverine co-captain continued. "The sprin-
ters-'are used to running 300 yards and you have to have
more at the end of this one. I'm a quarter miler and I
think I'm a little stronger than the sprinters."
BUT AFTER THE RACE, Grace had no idea that he'd
set a new world record. "All I was really trying to do was
win the race," he confessed.
"The announer was reading off what the different
clocks said and I couldn't figure out why until Chuckie
(Crouther) told me that it was a new record. I just
couldn't believe it.
THE RINK'S COLD temperatures had Grace more
worried about pulling aamuscle than setting a new world
standard. "I had to warm up a lot for the race," the
Detroit Mumford graduate said. "I felt good running the
race, real good coming off the last turn. But breaking the
record never entered my mind."
DESPITE HIS SPECTACULAR effort at the shorter
distance, Grace has no desire'to move into the sprint,
events.
"I'm a quarter miler who'll occasionally run the 300-
yard dash," asserted the Big Ten outdoor 400-meter co-
champion. The powerful senior has his sights set on
more important goals-helping his team to a Big Ten
championship.

AP Photo
Up, up and away.
Buffalo's Larry McNeill, formerly of Marquette University and a finalist in the
NBA's Slam Dunk competition, soars up against the NBA's rookie of the year
of last year, Los Angeles' Adrian Dantley. Weather halted much action in the
NBA last night.

TOUGH WEEKEND AHEAD FOR MEN
Gymnasts hurting for Quad meet

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:

Rogers content cU MSU

- By DIANE SILVER
Plagued by injuries and illness for a
majority of the season, the men gym-
nasts will have a tough weekend ahead
of them when they travel to Iowa City
for the Big Ten Quadrangular.
The tumblers will confront Illinois,
Wisconsin and Iowa, while competing
without one of their top all-arounders,
Marshall Garfield.
THE TEAM WAS finally back at full
strength last weekend, when all-
arounder Nigel Rothwell returned after
fighting mononucleosis for six weeks.
But as soon as things started looking
promising for the Wolverines, they had
to face yet another injury.
This time it was Garfield, a freshman
competing in only his second meet of
the season. A score of 50 in the all-
around competition gave Garfield the
top score from Michigan and also a
career high, but now, it looks like he
may be out for the remainder of the
season, according to Loken.
The injury seems to be cartilage
damage, Loken indicated, but the ex-
tent of the damage won't be determined
until later this week.
NOW, COACH LOKEN has to decide
between Rich Nisivaco and Chris Van
Mierlo as to replace Garfield as an all-
arounder. Rothwell's name will also
appear on the all-around roster, but he

is still working on getting back into top
form.
"Nigel is on the road to a fine perfor-
mance," said Loken, "but he still has
some catching up to do."
All the gymnasts have been working
hard on hitting their routines.
"Everyone's determined to improve
their own performance," continued
Loken.
THE FOUR TEAMS participating in
the triple-dual meet have all been con-
sistently scoring above 200. Illinois

U-

j%

EAST LANSING-Miehigan State
head football coach Darryl Rogers says
there is no truth in recurring rumors he
will be leaving MSU for another
coaching job.
"I would like to put to rest once and

ApPoll
Team .. Record
1. Kentucky (52) ........... 16-1
2. Arkansas (2) ............ 21-1
3. Marquette .............. 17-2
4. Notre Dame (2) ....... 16-3
5. U.C.L.A ................ 16-2
6. New Mexico (1) ... y..... 17-2
7. North Carolina ........ 18-4
8. Kansas .................. 18-3
9. Louisville ............... 14-3
10. Michigan State ........16-3
11. DePaul .............. 18-2
12. Texas ................ 18-3
13. Virginia ............ ..15-3
14. Wake Forest ............ 15-3
15. Illinois State ............ 18-2
16. Florida State .......... 16-3
17. Detroit ...../............ 18-1
18. Syracuse ................ 15-4
19. Nebraska .............. 18-3
20. Providence. ........... 17-4
UPI Poll
Team - Record
1. Kentucky (3)............ 16-1
2. Marquette (1) ........... 17-2
3. Arkansas (1) .......... 21-1
4. U.C.L.A. (1)........... 16-2
5. Notre Dame .......... 16-3
6. Kansas .............. 18-3
7. North Carolina........ 18-4
8. New Mexico (1) ......... 17-2
9. Louisville............ 14-3
10. Michigan State ......... 16-3
11. DePaulr.............. 18-2
12. Texas ............... 18-3
13. Purdue................. 13-6
14. Florida State ......... 16-3
15. Georgetown........... 15-4
16. Wake Forest.......... 13-5
(tie) Detroit........... 18-1
18. Nebraska ...........18-3
19. Virginia........ ...... 15-3
20. San Francisco.......... 17-4

scored a total of 215 against Ohio State
recently, and also has the added fortune
of having all their injured tumblers
returning to action.
The Illinois roster includes all-
arounders Steve Yasukawa and Carl
Antoniolli, who both posted a 53 in the
OSU meet.
Competition will begin with com-
pulsories on Friday at 7:30 p.m., and
will continue through Saturday with op-
tionals beginning at 3:30 p.m.

Pts.
1,140
879
836
723
566
399
382
379
365
260
245
180
117
77
76
68
56
55
46
30

for all these persistent rumors that I
am a candidate for any football
coaching job other than the one I now
have," Rogers said.
"I don't know how these things start,
but they're absolutely untrue."
Rogers said he is "very happy here at
Michigan State" and was 'immensely
gratified" that MSU extended his con-
tract two years, through 1983.
"I plan to stay right here and have
given no indication of anything else to
anyone," he said.
MSU sports information director
Fred Stabley said that despite Rogers'
continued denials, rumors are still
flying that he may go with the Chicago
Bears, the St. Louis Cardinals, Stanford
University or the University of Califor-
nia.-UPI
A's stayfhome
OAKLAND - The San Francisco Bay
Area baseball mess reached another
11th hour yesterday with Commissioner
Bowie Kuhn making the latest request
for action that would allow the Oakland
A's to move to Denver.
"But I can't see it at present," said
the president of Oakland Coliseum,
Robert T. Nahas, who received a phone
call from Kuhn Monday night. ( ,
Coliseum management announced

last Friday they intended to hold the A's
and owner Charles O. Finley to terms of
the long-term stadium lease and ex-
pected the American League club to be
playing here this season.
The A's drew 495,000 fans last year
while the National League's San Fran-
cisco Giants did only slightly better
with 700,000.
"He feels the situation could turn into
a disgrace for baseball," Nahas repor-
ted after his talk with Kuhn.
The commissioner made the same
point to Oakland Mayor Lionel Wilson
and other city officials.
Oilman Marvin Davis, the potential
buyer of the A's, said in Denver that he
was willing to keep his reported $12
million offer on the table a while longer
"before forgetting about the whole
thing for this year." - AP
ISCORES
College Basketball
Louisville 115, Tulane 86
N. Michigan 70, Michigan Tech 65 (OT)
William & Mary 70. Navy 62
Texas Tech 64, SMU 62
Marquette 82, Creighton 57
NBA
Cleveland 122, New Orleans 99

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Tuesday, February 14th-call Mrs. Cooper (SAB Rm. 3200) at
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1429 Hill Street.

aa o

Pts.
406
327
277
248
225
148
138
125
100
77
30
26
21
18
11
10
10
9
8
7

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