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February 03, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-03

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 3, 1978-Page3
0

3UV~i~it Aw-

CFYU SEE NNS HAPP CALLWD Y
Change of place
Sunday's Willie Nelson/Jerry Jeff Walker/Katy Moffatt concert has
been moved from Crisler Arena to Hill Auditorium. UACs Major
Events Offices says people who purchased tickets for the Crisler show
will be given "comparable" seats in Hill.
Carrying on
While thanking the people who helped us get the Daily on your door-
step during last week's blizzard, we inadvertently failed to mention
the valiant efforts of our carriers who literally got the paper on the
streets. Special thanks to Bob Abbott who made bulk deliveries by car
to the post office, merchants, University buildings and dorms. Thanks
also to circulation director John Leonard and his crew of carriers who
braved the elements and trudged through the mess on foot. Carry on
the good work.
Happenings..
start off a taxing day with a conference ot "Your Estate and
Tax Reform" at the Crisler Center. Contact the Extension Service for
further information ... Heather Booth, director of the Midwest
Academy, speaks at a noon Guild House luncheon on "Women
Organizing Change".. . the Ann Arbor Libertarian League's Laissez-
faire day begins at 1 p.m. with a showing of "The Incredible Bread
Machine" in the Henderson Room, 3rd floor, Michigan
League ... stay right in your seats, because Roy Childs will speak on
"The Drug Law Disaster" at 2... Bette Erwin discusses self-
liberation at 3, also in the Henderson Room ... from 3-5, Peggy Choy
will offer Asian dance demonstrations in the International Center
Recreation Room ... at 4, it's back to the Henderson Room to hear
Walter Block "Defending the Undefendables"... also at 4, the
Gemini Brothers and Percy Danforth will be at the Ann Arbor Public
Library, William and Fifth, with musical entertainment for the
kids... the three-day Black Arts and Cultural Festival continues with
an Art exhibit from 6-10 in Room 126, East Quad ... at 7:30, the
Gospel choir performs in the E.Q. auditorium... Prof. Priscilla
Soucek talks about Islamic Art at 8 in Auditorium D, Angell
Hall... grab your partner and promenade over to Xanadu Coop, 1811
Washtenaw, for some square and contra dancing at 8... end the day
with a karate demonstration at 9 in East Quad's South Cafeteria.
Thank God it's Friday!
Peek-a-boo
Yesterday was Groundhog Day, and Punxsutawney Phil scurried
out just long enough to see his shadow. According to legend, that
means we'll have six more weeks of this cold, miserable winter
weather. If Phil hadn't seen his shadow, it would have meant spring
was just around the corner. But Phil actually cheated a little. While
everyone was waiting for the world's numero uno groundhog to poke
his nose from a Pennsylvania burrow to make his annual prediction,
the sneaky critter was actually waiting out the latest cold snap in a
clean, warm cage. He did emerge long enough, however, to catch a
glimpse of the weather. Then he quickly went back inside. Who could
blame him?
On the outside ...
Looks like they put yesterday in the old Xerox machine to come up
with today's weather. It'll be partly cloudy, with a high of about 22, a
low of 10. Best of all, there will be no snow. The weather should warm
up over the weekend with temperatures in the upper 20s. There's even
a chance that we'll hit the freezing mark o Sunday? Who needs
Honolulu?
... . "y«... «s." .'Yi " i Yi~i:''i Y ii i.:i.' Di~.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... : . . : Lii i~ :
Daily Official Bulletin
:s::::: ::::::::::::::::::::;::::::::1i::33:i~:..:..::::.:....::.:.....:... .

Don't
over s

cry,
?.
pil;

milk'.$1
Oakland Baby Zoo manager Jean'
Brennan grimaces-as her new charge'
Pete, a seven-month-old baby hipo
spills its milk during a feeding. Pool
Pete is an orphan who arrived at the'
Oakland Zoo Tuesday after his pur-
chase from the Denver Zoo. No word if
Oakland gets any future draft choices
in the deal.

Mine workers near
contract agreement

WASHINGTON (AP) - United Mine
Workers UMW President Arnold Miller
summoned his union's bargaining coun-
cil to Washington yesterday as negotia-
tors neared agreement on contract
terms that could end the 59-day-old coal
strike.
But as the talks continued, fresh
violence was reported in the coal fields
and new steps were announced to deal
with the effect that dwindling coal sup-
plies are having on electrical capacity.
NEGOTIATORS for the UMW and the
Bituminous Coal Operators Association
met through the day to narrow their dif-
ferences on wages and other economic
issues and were "very close" to agree-
ment, sources said.
Miller scheduled a morning meeting
of the union's bargaining council, which
must approve any contract before a
ratification vote can be taken by the
rank and file.
"I would say they've reached a tenta-
tive agreement,' said John Guzek,
president of the UMW's District 6 in
northwest West Virginia and eastern
Ohio. But he added that Miller's call
could be an indication that union bar-
gainers had reached "a point where
they can't bargain any further and they
are looking for guidance."
THE COUNCIL rejected one pro-
posed contract in 1974 before accepting
a second pact.
The new violence was in western
Pennsylvania, where about 80 pickets
identified by police as UMW members
ripped out telephones, overturned
pickup trucks and smashed other equip-
ment at the Dixonville Mining Co. in In-
diana County.
Up to 600 pickets rallied at C&K Coal

Co.'s Rimersburg coal dumping appa-
ratus in Clarion County, Pa., on Wed-
nesday night, causing an estimated
$30,000 damage.
THREE STATE troopers sustained
minor injuries in a confrontation with
pickets armed with clubs, tire irons and
pickaxes.
No arrests were reported in either in-
cident, but two Indiana County men
were arrested on a college campus for
allegedly trying to' set fire to the
school's coal stockpiles.
Meanwhile, Monongahela Power Co.,
which serves 258,000 customers in West
Virginia and additional customers in
Ohio, asked- West Virginia Governor
Jay Rockefeller to issue an order lim-
iting electricity use.
The utility said its coal stockpile will
stand at 30 days next Monday and ad-
ded it will take- three weeks for new
supplies to arrive after production re-
sumes.
Also, Conrail announced in New York
that the strike will force an immediate
cutback in power use by trains on the
New Haven division air line. Limits
placed on train speed on the run will
result in delays of up to 30 minutes, of-
ficials said.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII. No. 103
Friday, February 3. 178
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

CINEMA II Aud. A Angell Hall
Friday, February 3,1978
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES
Director-HOWARD HAWKS (1953)
Two showgirls embark for France seeking rich husbands; their search lands
them in a Parasion police court. On the way JANE RUSSEL and MARILYN
MONROE do osong and dance number to the tune of "Diamonds Are a Girl's
Best Friend."
78 9pm $1.50
Tomorrow: Woody Allen's ANNE HALL
* * ** * *** ** ** ** * * *** * * * ** ** ** * ** * *.*
Cinema ii is now accepting new-member applications. Application
forms are available at all Cinema 1i film showings. Today is the last
day applications will be accepted.

'
,.fiii
4

TON IGHT:
the Anny r'bor film1coop00 ertivepresents
WOODY ALLEN'S LATEST
Friday, February 3
ANNIE HALL
(Woody Allen, 1977) 7.8:40,10:20-MLB 3
Woody Allen's latest movie is easily his most polished to date. It succeeds
nt merely as good comediy, but as gooc filmmaking, brilliant acting,
and a stunning, intelligent love story as well. WOODY ALLEN and DIANE
K5EATON star in this chronicle of a relationship between two New York
Cify neurotics. "ANNIE HALL puts Woody Allen inthe lepgue with the ,bpot :
directors we hove."-Vincent Canby. In conjunction with Cinema II.
Admission $1.25
.~ Y

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L±,r~i L" ll I.1'1LYi 1R:[1.a PI -
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1 .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. til 1:3b P.M. SUN. d HOLS.12 Noon til1 :30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.S0 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25

The Daily Official Bulletin is an official publication
of the University of Michigan. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to 409 E. Jefferson,
before 2 p.m. of the day preceeding publication and
by 2 pim. Friday for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.
Items appear once only. Student organization notices
are not accepted for publication. For more informa-
tion, phone 764-9270.
Friday, February 3, 1978
DAILY CALENDAR
Extension Service: Your Estate and "Tax Re-
form," Chrysler Ctr., 8 a.m.
Guild House: 50 soup and sandwich luncheon.
Heather Booths, Dir.
Mid-Western Academy, "Women Organizing
Change," 802 Monroe, noon.
Music School: Symphony Band, Wind Ensemble,
Hill Aud., 8p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - Phone 763-4117
Peoples Gas Light/Coke Co., Chicago, Ill. An-
nounces summer intern program for students ma-
joring in engr., acct., computer science. Further
details available.
The amount of lubricating oil that is
discarded annually totals some one
billion gallons-that would fill a tank 90
feet across and one mile high.

Camp Ohiyesa, Metro. YMCA. Will interview
Mon., Feb. 6 from 1 to 5. Openings - cabin coun-
selors, waterfront (WSI), tripping, unit director.
Register in person or by phone.
Camp Sea Gull, MI. Coed. Will interview Mon.,
Feb. 6 from 9 to 12 and 1-3:30. Openings include ten-
nis, arts/crafts, nurse, gymnastics, guitar. Register
by phone or in person.
Lessons at
Dance Space
314' S. State
beginning Feb. 10
6weeks-$21
for more information
call 995-4242

TICKET SALES

,1.tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtime.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.
ONE OF THE BEST
Richard Dreyfuss
Marsha Mason
Fp-O Quinn Cummings

10:40:
1:15
4:00
6:30
9:00>

Xrl7OL Nff&$V1

10:15
12:45
3:45
7:15
9:45

;arch it

MEDIATRICS
THE DEEP
A film about a young couple who go to Bermuda on vacation.
Mystery and morphine enter the picture, though, as the
couple end up searching for treasure. This movie contains
some fantastic underwater photography as well as Jacqueline
Bisset in a wet t-shirt.
FEBRUARY 3rd 7:00 and 9:30
L2 AVn g AS RI

THIS MOVIEIS TOTALLY
OUT OF CONTROL1
12:15
2.15
4:15
-:>7:00
-A U - T N:15
:. r RFI~~~~t Ati YI' N FIlM EN[HIE3UIIONC()~tMPANY [NC
A;mt.iug 77tory4 AIrMS INC atr
9:4
S" r n .. i tch:

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