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January 25, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Wednesday, January 25, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Library crowds

confront

U'

Soviet spy satellite
drops over Canada

(Continued from Page 1)
studies surpass the whisper range.
Jon Layer, president of the Michi-
gan Student Assembly (MSA) said
more space where students could
socialize would quell some of the
noise in the libraries.
"THE COMMITTEE on Student
Space is working on getting more
places for students to congregate,"
he said, adding that the decor in the
Michigan Union is "not conducive to
talking and sitting around. "You
walk in and it looks like a bus sta-
lion." Its transition back to a union
for students would attract more
library'socializers, Lauer said.
"This would at least give us one
place, and that's the direction we
want to go."
A longer-term 'solution lies in
plans for construction of a library
for natural sciences and the fine ar-
ts. But until then, said Wagman,
"Study space in dormitories will be
provided for residents," allowing
more room for students who need to
use the library collections as well as
those who do not live in University
housing.
Calling the suggestion for

cafeteria study an "immediate solu-
tion to the overcrowding," Robert
Starring, assistant to the associate
director of public services, stressed
the Graduate Library has "no inten-
tion of excluding undergrads. ,
"We're just trying to discourage
Food for
(Continued from Page 1),
Library officials have attempt-
ed to bring home to violators their
effects on library materials by dis-
playing several tattered - and
moldy remnants of abused books
in glass casings in the Graduate
Library.
OFFICIALS say that food
sloshed onto books entices hungry
cockroaches, who lurk in cool,
dark corners. They gnash the food
until they have consumed the book
paste, leaving eggs and disease as
a tip.
"We really do not believe that
eating and libraries are compat-
ible," Starring said. Referring to

the use of the library for socializing.
If students prefer the atmosphere of
the library, that's fine," he said.
STUDENTS, IN general, reacted
unfavorably to the idea of cafeteria
studying.
thought ca
the two and a half million volumes
housed in the Graduate Library,
he added, "So miiany are not
replaceable. Many editions in the
stacks are no longer published."
Also tacked up in the display is
the sternly worded Regulation for
Protection of Libraries. In black
letters, it states: "Any student
who willfully mutilates, defaces,
removes or attempts to remove
any items belonging to the collec-
tors of the libraries of the Univer-
sity shall be punished by a fine of
$100 or by suspension from the
University or by both."
BUT FEW violators have ever
been prosecuted. "We hardly ever
know when it happens," Starring

"You've got to be kidding," said
undergraduate Jeff Lawniczak. "All'
my friends lived in a dorm and,
couldn't wait to get out. The Grad
Library has a much more mature
atmosphere.,,
Luses mness
said. "It's hard to catch someone
in the act."
Monitors have been periodically
stationed at the north door of the
Graduate Library, scanning stu-
dents for suspicious-looking con-
tainers and bags.
Charred books in the exhibit in-
dicate food is not the villain that
students cart into the libraries.
Darrow said by the time smok-
ing rules are strictly enforced in
the UGLI, she plans to have her
dissertation completed. "Books
are made by man, for us and by us
- not the other wayraround," she
declared.

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WASHINGTON (UPI) - A faulty
Soviet spy satellite carrying a nuclear
power reactor distintegrated in earth's
atmosphere over northwest Canada
yesterday, but the Canadian defense
minister said it was unlikely any
radioactive material hit the ground.
The White House reported the
development at a hastily called news
conference and said the United States
had sent special radiation monitoring
aircraft to sample the air over the re-
entry zone.
MSA
sets
special
election
By MARK PARRENT
A special campus-wide referendum
will be held next month for a plan alter-
ing the selection process of Michigan
Student Assembly (MSA) representa-
tives, the assembly voted last night.
The proposed amendment to the All-
Campus Constitution calls for one rep-
resentative from each of the Univer-
sity's schools and colleges for every
1,150 students in each school. Schools
with fewer than 575 students will be al-
lowed a seat, but will only have one-half
of a vote.
THE PROPOSED amendment also
includes a provision calling for annual
MSA elections rather than balloting
everyterm under the present system.
MSA also approved five nA-w mem-
bers of the Central Student Judiciary
(CSJ). The five are: William Smelko,
Shelly Drew, Dennis Persing, Kimaron
Gardner, and Audrey Sullivan.
Last night's meeting was broadcast
live over student-operated radio station
WRCN (650-AM) in the first of four trial
broadcasts. Rick David, who provided
commentary as the meeting progress-
ed, said the station broadcasted the
meeting as a "public service."
"HOPEFULLY, it will make the As-
sembly more responsive to student
needs," said David.
MSA also passed a resolution sup-
porting a bill now pending in the state
House of Representatives concerning
an income tax credit for students.

"THE CHANCES OF real hazard are
small," said National Security Affairs
adviser Zbigniew Brezezinski. "We feel
there is no danger and in fact there may
be no contamination at all."
In Ottawa, Defense Minister Barney
Danson said it was highly unlikely any
of the enriched uranium aboard the
spacecraft had reached the ground.
"Chances were 98 percent that it
dissipated as it fell through the at-
mosphere," he said.
THE SATELLITE'S re-entry was
timed at 6:53 a.m. EST. Shortly after 7
a.m. President Carter discussed the
situation by telephone with Canadian
Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau.
Carter was quoted as saying the
satellite was a "radar-type oceanic
surveillance satellite." -
The unmanned satellite, designated
Cosmos 954, was launched Sept. 18. The
United States learned the spacecraft
was in trouble in December and Br-
zezinski said the Soviets immediately
informed a number of nations when the
craft fell into the atmosphere.
The concern was that the satellite's
destruction caused by the friction of air
against the spacecraft structure would
scatter radioactive material in the at-,
mosphere.
DANSON SAID under international
agreement, the Soviet Union was
responsible for the liability of any con-
tamination, although Canada and the
United States would assume the cost of
the radiation search.
Speaker Thomas O'Neill said the
White House informed him and other
Democratic and Republican leaderi in
the House and Senate 10 days ago of the
satellite's problems and had kept them
informed since then.
Brzezinski emphasided that Soviet of-
ficials had cooperated with the United
States and other nations in keeping tabs
on the spacecraft. A White House sour-
ce said the *hot line message circuit
between Washington and Moscow was
not used.
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