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January 24, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Tuesday, January 24, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Where it comes from..'

The iBudget Dollar
Fiscal Year 1979 Estimate

Where it goes...

Congress gets
Carter's $500
billion budget

Excise Taxes Other
5 4 Borrowing
Individual1C13
Income Teai: Corporation
358 Income Taxes
insu23Ce ReBceipts
Source, The WhIte House

Paymints to 14
Indiiduas Nt Interest
11 1
Grants to States Other Federal
and localities Operations

This graph shows both income and
disbursements for President Carter's
proposed 1979 fiscal budget, which
would go into effect July 1. The budget
provides for total outlays of $500.2 bil-
lion, up from $462.2 billion during the
1978 fiscal year. Thirty-seven per cent
of proposed outlays will be direct bene-
fit payments to individuals, including
Social Security and welfare recipients.

(Continued from Page 1)
"It is now up the the Congress to com-
mit itself to similar restraints, other-
wise the deficit will continue at levels
that will be impossible to defend before
the American public."
Carter reiterated his commitment to
a balanced budget but acknowledged
that the target date of 1981, which he set
during his presidential campaign,
might be missed if the economy needed
more tax-cut tonic during the inter-
vening years.
Chairman Al Ullman (D-Ore.) of the
tax-writing House Ways and Means
Committee, who had already called the
administration tax reduction proposals.
excessive, questioned also the extent to
which proposed tax tightening, projec-
ted to recoup some of the lost revenues,
would be approved.
HE SAID CARTER "included $9
billion of pickups from reform, more
than two-thirds of which is not going to
happen "
Mahon said he opposes "so-called-
reforms which would hit most heavily
on middle-class America," including

percent, from 6.1 percent in 1978 and 6.9
percent in 1977.
" Unemployment, 5.8 percent by the
fourth quarter, down from 6.2 percent
in 1978 and 6.6 percent in 1977. The
jobless rate in December of last year
was 6.4 percent.
CARTER SAID THE main elements
of his tax cut program for individuals
are to replace the existing $750 deduc-
tion for personal exemptions with a tax
credit of $240, and to reduce the income
tax rates from the current range of 14-
70 percent to a new range of 12-69 per-
cent.
He said there would be $258 in tax
savings for the typical family of four
with $15,000 income; $270 for a family
with $20,000 income, $320 for a family
with $25,000 income, and $322 for a
family withi$30,000 income.
Carter said he wants to increase
educational spending by $1.3 billion, a
gain of 14.2 percent that is the largest
hike since the Democrats controlled the
White House a decade ago.
IN HEALTH, CARTER proposed

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Towns hip 0o't(have
to reveal mayoral vo'tes'

(Continued from Page 1)
Wheeler said, "In spite of whatever
happens in the case, I'm glad that the
Supreme Court ruled that the right of
the secret ballot shall be protected
unless there's evidence of fraud."
EQUALLY PLEASED, of course,
were the remaining 15 voters who now
will not face the choice of telling how
they voted or being cited with contem-
pt.

"We're very happy it turned out this
way. Nov we can stop holding our
breaths," said Cornelia Landes who,
along with her husband Steve, has spent
the last three months trying to decide
what she would do if called to the stand.
While expressing relief at the
decision, Robert Henry, Belcher's
lawyer, cautioned that the main
issue-that of who should be mayor-is
still undecided.
"IT'S UP TO (Monroe county visiting
judge James) Kelley now to complete
the trial," Henry said. "We have here
an election decided by one vote and at

least 20 votes that are admittedly
illegal, so the only thing to do is to guess
how they voted, ignore the votes com-
pletely, or void the election."
Kelley, reached at home in Monroe
last night, said the proceedings would
be set to reconvene "as soon as
possible."
"I always wondered about (asking
the voters to tell), but that was the law,
and if (the Supreme Court) wants to
change it, I say fine," Kelley said.

There are no assurances that Congress will enact
Carter's budget as he proposed it. Indeed, it would be
unusual if Congress did not make major changes to
reflect its own spending priorities, which often are dif-
ferent from those of the White House.
. r. " :,: :' ." 4 '; . N, .: x +}:,N :t ! ,ke4" tr ~ c y^':

YA'LL COME!
Wednesday Nights
at
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r
- CHUCK WAGON BARBEQU
5 P.M. to 11 P.M.
A Buffet full of your favorite Western Style vittles. BBQ Ribs
and a whole heap o'beef. Plus all the other fixin's to whet your
There's food a plenty and dancing 9:00 P.M. to 1:30 A.M. in
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X5.95,
'Your Host: Dick Simzak Holiday
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2940Jaclcson Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich.
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IE

s, Chicken
r appetite.
the Horn

elimination of deductions for sales and
gasoline taxes.
O'Neill, however, said he thinks such
reforms could pass in the House, since
they involve relatively small sums for
each taxpayer, though large amounts
for the Treasury in the aggregate.
He said Democrats always stood for
employment, wages and a strong
economy "and we are not going to
sacrifice those for increases in defense
or any other."
THE DEPARTMENT -of Health,
Education and Welfare would receive
the largest portion of Carter's budget, a
total of $181.2 billion, up from $164.6
billion in 1978. Some $103.1 billion of this
will be for Social Security payments.
The Defense Department would
receive the next largest share, $115.2
billion, up from $105.3 billion in 1978.
Carter said this represents an increase
in real spending-meaning after in-
flation is discounted-of 3 percent. Vir-
tually all of that would be to strengthen
U.S. participation in the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization.
The budget also contained Carter's
forecasts for the economy through 1979.
The targets are:
" Gross national product, to 4.9 per-
cent, from 4.7 percent in 1978 and 4.9
percent in 1977.
Inflation, consumer prices cut to 6

spending $118 million on a new program
to extend Medicaid benefits to about
100,000 low-income pregnant women
who are otherwise ineligible. There
would also be expanded contraceptive
services and sex education for teen-
agers.
Carter asked for a 25 percent in-
crease in spending on energy programs
to a total of $12 billion, with about $3.3
billion of this to purchase and store
crude oil in the new, 500-million-barrel
Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which
has already been authorized by
Congress.
Spending for energy conservation
would increase by $80 million to $324
million.
There are no assurances that
Congress will enact Carter's budget as
he proposed it. Indeed, it would be
unusual if Congress did not make major
changes to reflect its own spending
priorities, which often are different
from those of the White House.
Carter said his budget-preparers
used so-called zero-based-budgeting
techniques to give each agency's ex-
penditures special scrutiny. The
results, he said, have been "better,
more even-handed judgments."

. . 1
i
11

Assertiveness raining.
What's That?
The Peer Counselors in Assertiveness

Training of University Counseling
are offering a chance to find out.
WednesdayJan.25 th
at 7:30 p m.

Services

Just for the
health of it.
Get moving, America!
March 1-7. 1977 is
National Physical Education and Sport Week
Physical Education Public Information
Amneri1can Alliance for Health
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 16th St N W Washington 0C 20036

Alums propose site
for new headquarters

t

in, Eist .Quad's Greene LOung
There will be an informal presentation of the
basic ideas behindAssertiveness Training.
If you have ever considered learning about Assertive-
ness Training, this is your chance.

By MITCH MARGO
Barring any valid opposition, the
University Alumni Association will
construct its new headquarters just
north of the Michigan League
Building's Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Currently, the sole objection to the
proposed site has been the new struc-
ture's possible effect on the theater's
acoustics, but Chief Financial Officer
James Brinkerhoff said University ar-
chitects "indicate the problem is not in-
surmountable."
THE PROPOSED two-story building,
costing nearly $1 million, will be finan-
ced by two bequests totaling about
$950,000.
Robert Forman, executive director of
the association, said any additional
funds would be collected from other
sources.

Addressing the Regents Friday,
Forman said the Alumni Association
has been studying possible sites since
1972 and has looked at seven locations
on North Campus, two in the athletic
area, and three in the Central Campus
area.
The Alumni Association was
originally housed in what is now the
University Art Museum, but eventually
moved to the basement of the Michigan
Union.
According to Forman, the present of-
fices are too small, some are without
windows and lack adequate ventilation.
According to University President
Robben Fleming, the University will
seek more public comment about the
proposed site before any binding
decisions will be made.

-751

THE PEER COUNSELORS
IN
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
are offering
On-Going Groups in
Assertiveness Training
(sponsored by University Counseling Services)
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING IS:
-a way by which one learns to deal honestly, directly,
and appropriately with friends, parents, authority
figures, etc.;
-a method by which one gets in touch with his/her
"rights" and feelings in interpersonal situations;
-a supportive group environment in which individuals

1-1

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TONIGHT at
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Appearing Thru Sunday:.
shimmer

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WE WANT YOU .
to help new students next fall
apply to be a
FALL ORIENTATION
LEADER
Come to the

'MUSIC AND MEAL DEAL" !

11

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