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January 22, 1978 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-22

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The Michigan Doily-Sunday, January 22, 1978-Page 5

Striking 'College' stirs audience

By MARK JOHANSSON
T0 UNDERSTAND this one you
really had to be there, because the
unusual night of music presented in Hill
Auditorium Friday by the School of
College II
Hill Auditoriun
January 20, 1978
Overture to Candide.......Bernstein arr. Beeler
Passacaglia for Violin
and Viola............Handel arr. Havlerson
Jazz Trio
Figure Humane Cantata ................. Poulenc
Report...... ........... ................... Fiser
Gregorian Chant
Perpetual Motion ............ Paganini arr. Seward
Canzon Quarti Toni ....................... Gabrieli
Synchronisms II ....................... Davidovsky
Symphony No. 4 in F minorOp. 36,
IV Allegro con fuoco ........... Tchaikovsky
H. Robert Reynolds, Thomas Hilbish, Gustav Meier,
Allan McMurray, Stephen Osmond, conductors; Ker-
ry Thompson, production coordinator.
Music was almost beyond description.
Entitled Collage II, the dramatic and
fast-paced program contained
something for everyone.
Performed by six different groups,
the music spanned the years from
about 900 to the present. In both halves
of the program the groups played their
music in a collage, or non-stop, and
each piece began on the final note of the
preceeding piece. Because there was no

time for applause (until the end), and
the music contrasted so surprisingly,
the program was brisk and exciting.
Starting about 15 minutes late, the
program began with Overture to Can-
dide by B~ernstein, performed by the
University Symphony Band. The tempo
was stirring and kept even throughout
while the difficult rhythms were played
well (especially by the woodwinds).
Because of the lack of stage space, the
percussion sounded too loud at times as
they were placed to the side and front of
the band, instead of to the rear.
A PASSACAGLIA by Handel was
played with aniniation by George Mar-
sh, violin, and Scott Woolweaver, viola.
After conquering a minor tempo
problem in one of the first variations,
the two played increasingly well as they
got into Handel's beautiful harmonies.
Their intonation was good, as was their
balance-particularly during the slow
variations.
Next, a jazz trio of Kevin Gibbs,
piano, Craig Nelson, bass, and Doug
Walter, drums, played a short com-
position, and they really should have
played longer. The three talented
musicians, who sounded very good
together, showed about three minutes
of frantic virtuosity and suddenly they
finished.

In sharp contrast to the percussive
jazz, the University Chamber Choir
sang the difficult neo-classical har-
monies of Liberte from the Figure
Humaine Cantata by Poulenc. The
choir gaver a beautiful and sensitive in-
terpretation of the work; the unusual
texture and movement of musical ideas
with the subtly rising and falling
dynamics.
THE FIRST HALF ended with
Fiser's Report by the University Wind
Ensemble, characterized by the alter-
nation of sections of powerful dissonent
chords, a rousing march, and loud
repeated notes (displaying some mar-
velous tongue-work) the Finale being a
fantastic march with a strong brass
counter melody fading away under a
drum cadence.
As the light dimmed after inter-
mission, the solemn sounds of a
Gregorian Chant, being sung off-stage
by the University Chamber Choir,
flowed into the dark auditorium. At fir-
st the music -was hard through the
plaster walls and the coughs of the
audience, but as the audience quieted
down and the singing got louder, the fir-

st century melody created an eerie ac-
companiment to the glimmer of the exit
lights.
After a performance of Paganini's
Perpetual Motion by Steve.Seward and
Leonard Swanson, tuba, and James
Lancioni, marimba, with much oomph
and wiggling of eyebrows (the rest goes
without description), all heads turned
around and upward as polyphonic
chords of the venetian master Giovanni
Gabrieli soared from four corners of
the second balcony. As the sounds of the
four groups of the University of
Michigan Brass Choir rushed around
the cieling, down to the stage, and back
across the main floor, the audience was
transported, and when the groups all
played in unison, the chords had mon-
strous resonation.
SYNCHRONISMS II for Quartet and
Electronic. Tape by Davidovsky, per-
formed by the Contemporary Direc-
tions Ensemble, Sue Pilla, flute,
Michael Wilder, clarinet, Jill Rieth-
miller, violin, and Karen Kaderavek
cello, will go without any comment, ex-
cent that it was one of the best works
I've ever let myself sit through.

Daily Photo by JOHN KNOX
Quentin and Edmond Badoux play flute and charango at the Ark
A s
Ark cooks with tunes
fro-m South Africa

o4

By MIKE TAYLOR
T HE ARK WAS crowded Friday
night, so crowded, in fact, that the
usually peaceful intermission became
a human bustle as folks aimed for pop-
corn, coffee, and cokes. But after just a
few minutes of Edmond and Quentin
Badoux's intriguing performance of
exotic tunes from the Andean region of
South America, it wasn't hard to see
why - the Badoux's make enchanting,
often beautiful music, music no one
should miss.
Using a variety of instruments native
to the countries the songs come from,
such as the charango, a ten-stringed in-
strument made from the shell of an ar-
madillo and tuned like a mandolin; pan
pipes; tarkas, a rectangular-looking
recorder; and bombo, a large drum; as
well as various flutes and guitars, the
pair created a rich show;
"These songs are the result of inter-
action between principally two cultures
- the Indian and the Spanish," noted
Edmond early'on. So \when the couple
sang, as they did every now and then,
they either sang in Spanish or Quechua,
a South American Indian language.
THE EVENING, which was co-spon-
sored by the University Office of Ethics
and Religion, opened with a lively char-
ango and flute duet. With its simple
melody and high notes, it seemed to call
the crowd to order, just as a native
musician would in Ecuador, Bolivia,
Peru, Chile, or Argentina.
Next, the pair picked up sets of pan
pipes, which are often played two at the
same time to form a full scale. The
melody started off soft and pretty, em-
phasizing low, raspy tones, but the up-
per registers gradually crept in. Before
long, the duo were sending out tidal
waves of sound, flooding the happy
crowd in music.
Later, Edmond played six-hole and
four-hole flutes together, after explain-
ing, "You have to play them with your
eyes closed - otherwise, you become
cross-eyed." Accompanied by Quentin
on guitar, he produced beautiful sounds
clearly not possible on one flute only.
A SONG FROM Ecuador about black
velvet, which is used for mourning, was
a slow, plaintive ballad,- simple, but
very effective. From Bolivia came an
anti-war/pro-love song featuring Ed-
mond on pan pipes and bombo and
Quentin on charango.
A duet on tarkas, the long, squared-
off recorder, was a definite highlight.
Edmond and Quentin's instruments
were the same octave, but tuned to dif-
Jferent keys. Edmond's first notes

sounded a dentist drill, Quentin's like
an unearthly saxophone.
THEN, THEY BEGAN to play togeth-
er, releasing sounds that seemed shock-
ingly atonal at first, but with time
seemed quite harmonious. The sight of
the pair dancing about with peculiar in-
struments protruding from- their,
mouths, playing such unusual -music,
seemed right out of Star Wa'rs or a "Sat-
urday Night Live" skit.
Edmond, who moved to Montreal
from Switzerland ten years ago, started
learning South American tunes a few
years later, using records, tapes, and
South American friends as sources.
Then, a few years ago, he met New
York City-born Quentin at a Buffalo
folk festival.
They recently spent 15 months travel-
ing around South America. Besides the
wealth of customs and songs they pick-
ed up, they learned to recognize the
regions songs come from, as well as the
correct instruments for certain songs.
Flutes are usually used for Indian cere-
monial purposes - often with drums,
and strings are used for love songs, for
example.
Edmond pointed out that his shows
with Quentin will never fully capture
South American music because,
"There, +everyone plays music - it is
not a show - it has a place in the life of
the community. As soon as you do it in a
show, it's different." Quentin quickly
added, "The only professional mu-
sicians in South America are the beg-
gars."

SQUARE DANCING
Free lessons for beginners
7:00-8:30 Jan. 23
at the MICHIGAN UNION
NO PARTNERS NECESSARY
For more information, call Mike at 663-6204
-
/ ii
FOURTH PROGRAM

HA iK VA HCAMPAIGN KICKOFF

United Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund
University of Michigan

Our Guest: REV JOHN GRAUEL
" Served as second-in-command on the illegal ship Exodus in
1947
" Dynamic Speaker
* Recipient of the Fighter for Israel Medal, with two combat
ribbons, the Humanity Medal,,and many other awards in a
constant struggle for humanitarian values.
Come hear the Rev. Grauel speak:

1. 4

UGLI MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
MONDAY, JANUARY 23-8 P.M.

For information about the
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Sandy Starkman 668-8039
David Groner 663-1824

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