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January 22, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*

U

CAMP NEBAGAMON for boys
LAKE NEBAGAMON, WISCONSIN 54849
ESTABLISHED 1929
1978 SEASON OPENINGS
Arts & Crafts Director, Photography Director, Sailing Director,
General Cabin Counselors, Bookkeeper. Interviews Jan. 31st
at Career Planning & Placement Bureau, Student Activities

Page 2-Sunday, January 22, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Anxiety bug hits 'U' sti

Bldg. Contact Mrs. Cooper.
Boys in grades 4 thru 9
From over 25 states.
8 and 4 week sessions

'Run)
ACCREDITED
C P

BERNARD & SALLY STEIN,
DIRECTORS
7433 Cromwell
Clayton, Missouri 63105

(Continued from Page 1)
exam and come back upset, worrying
about future exams, at the same time
feeling relief from the past exam.,
Newbury said there are two major
types, of problem students: the pro-
crastinator and the obsession-type
student.
"The procrastinators don't do any-
thing until the last moment and the
obsession-type studies 40 to 50 hours
a week," Newbury said.,
Newbury blames most of the
student problems on the University,
rather than the students themselves.
"High school counselors misrepre-
sent the real world and the Univer-
sity reinforces the misrepresenta-
tions," Newbury said.

He explained that many counselors
fail to inform students of the actual
job market: "You've got about 75 per
cent of the students either pre-med or
pre-law, and half the remaining 25
per cent are business oriented,"
Newbury said.
"People should not feel that the
medical and law professions are the
only careers to choose from," he
added.
Newbury said the University hous-
ing squeeze is partly to blame for
some student problems. The convert-
ing of standard two-person rooms
into triples increases roommate
anxiety.
"Close to one half of the triples

have roommate fights," Newbury
said. "It's not the student's fault, but
the University's and the University
has an obligation to meet these prob-
lems."
Newbury said he feels it is about
time the University makes a move to
correct its problems and help stu-
dents develop anxiety coping skills.
He proposed a "brainstorming
session" where University deans,
counselors and resident advisors
would seek answers to the anxiety
problem.
Dr. Alice Brunner, director of
student counseling services, said she
has also noticed an increase in
student problems caused by Univer-

r

rouble With a9th
Do you freeze on Math eXams?
We also have a program for students specifically in-
terested in the reduction of Math anxiety. (sta-
tistics, economics.)
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
CALL

Cambodian recounts atrocities

764-631
K-117 W. Quad
Institute for
Human Adjustment

764-9481
1610 Washtenaw
Reading and Learning Skills Center

Program under direction of
DR. JAMES D. PAPSDORF
Associate Prof. of Psychology, U-M

Sponsored by
Laboratory of Applied Psychology

THIS IS A SERVICE-RESEARCH
PROGRAM t

TEST ANXIOUS?
Does test anxiety cause you to
-Freeze on exams?
-Have trouble studying?
-Do more poorly in courses than you feel you should?
If any of the above apply to you, our test anxiety
program may be helpful to you.
for futher information
-CALL-

(Continued from Page 1)
could be integrated into the new
society.
"IN JANUARY 1976, we began
eating communally. You could no
longer keep cooking utensils or
Publicity Seminar
for
Student Organizations
An introduction to the fundamen-
tals of Publicity, covering a broad
range of topics.
WHEN: Wed., Jan. 25-2-5
p.m.
WHERE: Conference Rooms 1
& 2
Michigan Union
CONTACT: Mandy Gordon
Student Organizations
Coord.
763-0077
* * *NO CHARGE* * *
WHAT ON EARTH
IS AN
A THEIST?
(An atheist should be more than
just someone who knows there
are no gods)
American Atheists
Ann Arbor Chapter
Presents
Reason vs. Mysticism
Talk by Mich. Director
John Cruz
Followed by Open Forum
Literature Available
Mich. Union Ballroom
Wed., Jan. 25, 1978
7:30 P.M.
for further information call
668-7388 or 721-6630

uncooked rice. Everything belonged
to the 'angkar,' the Khmer word for
the organization. Rations began to di-
minish in March until they reached
one tin of rice per, day for eight
people. There were many deaths due
to sickness. I would estimate that 80
per cent of the people died.
"Generally, the poor died first
because the wealthier people still had
jewels they could barter with the
wives of the Khmer Rouge soldiers
for extra food.
"If a mother was caught stealing
food, the whole family was taken
away. Cats and dogs disappeared.
People began to eat the flesh from
dead bodies. A teacher who ate the
flesh of her dead sister was caught
- and beaten to death with sticks in
front of the whole village, her child
crying beside her.
Then, in May 1977, he and his wife
and 10 others left on a 100-mile trek
through the jungle to the border with
Thailand. His wife and the others
were eventually caught by the
Khmer Rouge, he said. He was the
last left free'
"I ATE leaves and fruits, frogs and
turtles. Three vultures followed me
for a week. Five kilometers from the
border, the Khmer Rouge saw and
took me prisoner. But I was no longer
afraid. I thought that by dying I

would join my family."
Yathay said he "miraculously"
managed to escape from his captors
during a driving rainstorm and made
his way into Thailand on his hands
and knees. He displays a picture
taken by Thai officials a month after
he arrived. He was so gaunt that his
head lookslike a balloon on a string.
It is impossible to tell if it is Yathay.
"The Khmer Rouge are very radi-
cal communists. They beat the
Americans by force of arms and they
were the first to do so. They are very
proud of this, and they want to show
the world they are first among com-
munists that they can establish a
pure, classless society before anyone
else.
"But with all these deaths and
destruction, did the Khmer Rouge
succeed in establishing a classless
society? No. There are two classes.
Those of the new population who
survive have seen thousands die. r
"The Khmer Rouge leaders are
intellectuals, trained in France. They
have acknowledged that because of
this they have individualist tenden-
cies that could come out. They can't
let up because that would be senti-
mental and they could be accused of
revisionism and called traitors.
They're caught in their own trap."

adents
sity pressures.
Brunner said besides the Univer
sity demands, students struggle t
meet parent's expectations and try t
meet accomplishments of older
brothers and sisters.
"High achievers from the top o
their high school class come here
and find they can't be at the top of the
class. Immediately they think. that
there is something wrong and doubt
their self-worth."
Gene Nissen, assistant dean o
LSA, said the attrition rate among
LSA students has increased over the
years and about one-third may drop
out before graduating.
He said of the 400 LSA students on
probation from last semester, 30
will probably leave the University
Although most students learn to
cope with their problems, some
University students try the ultimae
cop-out - suicide.
Fred Davids, director of Univer:
sity safety, said on-campus suicide
attempts between 1971-76 numbered
31, some of which were successful:
Last year there were five suicide at;
tempts.
d
An ounce
(Continued from Page 1)
"Things are pretty normal here,"
said police Lt. Dale Heath. We
haven't had many reports of attacks:
of late, although we do have a:
composite of the guy from State and-
we're keeping an eye out for him."
''Looking a t other campuses, I'd.
say Ann Arbor is about as safe as any:
of them," said Walter Stevens,
assistant director of campus secur-.
ity. "To the best of our knowledge,;
I'd say that the numbers are lower-
than they were last year at this'
time."u
In some places, being careful has:
become a fact of life.
"If a guy has a girlfriend here, he
always walks her home," said Jer
ome Schulte, a member of the Sigma
faehavegparty,weseethata
the girls are escorted, but we just
consider that common courtesy.
'Other than that, we haven't though
about it much. It's not the kind of
problem we have," he said.
Somne sororities, however, are tak--
-in wprectons.
"No one feels threatened about;
something happening here like i
Florida, but certainly no one would
walk alone after all that happened
last year," said Annamarie Kersten,
a member of Alpha Phi.
We have started a closing duty,:
though, where two girls go around
each night and check to make sure all
the adors arelocked,"she said.r-
reportedly occurred last week, had
adopted a new visitors policy where
by no one walks around unescorted in
the house unless that person is a
member.

M6-6311
K- 117 W. Quad
Instdustenfor
Human Adjustment

764-9481
1610 Washtenaw
Reading and Learning..
Skills Center

WE WANT YOU .. .
to help new students next fall
apply to be a
FALL ORIENTATION
LEADER
Come to the
Orientation Office
2530 SAB,
from Monday, Jan. 23 to
Friday, Feb. 17, 1978.
An offirmative action,
non-discriminatory employer.

Program under direction of
Dr. James D. Papsdorf
Associate Professor of Psychology, U-M
Sponsored by Laboratory
of Applied Psychology
This is a service-research program

a

D0
MICHIGAN
UNION
BALLROOM

0 @
TUESDAY
JANUARY 24, 1978
NOON - 11:00 PM

COLLEGE GRADS
WANTED FOR

"
"
"
"
"
"
"

AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
EDUCATION
ENGINEERING
FRENCH
HOME ECON.
LIBERAL ARTS
MATH
NURSING
THE SCIENCES

I

NTERNA TIONAL

PROJ ECTS

ALL DAY
Israel Programs information
Jewish Studies information
Jewish Job opportunities
fewish student groups at U of M
Book and Record Sale
Israeli snacks and Kosher
sandwiches on sale
Shaliach from Israel Aliyah
Center available for
appointment
Art Exhibit

BY THE HOUR

l
m

Noon-I Israeli Dancing
Conversation with a) Recent
returnees from Israel Winter
Seminar, b) Ann Arbor delegates
to N. American Jewish Students
Convention
1-2:30 Hebrew Songfest-guitars welcome!
2-4:00 Hebrew Calligraphy Workshop
4-5:00 Israeli Dancing for beginners
Discussion on Jewish Literature
and Aesthetics
5-6:00 Poets Circle
6-7:00 Israeli Folkdancing - advanced
7-8:00 Jewish Free School - groups on
Judaism and Christianity, Mid-East
Politics, Talmud, Hebrew conversation
G
9-10:30 p.m. Pendleton Room
COFFEE HOUSE

1

YOU CAN BECOME INVOLVED IN AN IMPORTANT,
MEANINGFUL MOVEMENT FOR WORLD PEACE AS
A PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER, AND HELP PEOPLE IN
A THIRD-WORLD COUNTRY WITH PROBLEMS OF
POVERTY, HUNGER, IGNORANCE AND DISEASE.
IF YOU ARE WILLING TO SHARE YOUR SKILLS WITH
PEOPLE WHO REALLY NEED THEM AND ARE ABLE TO
PUT OFF CLIMBING THAT LADDER, GETTING THOSE
BENEFITS, AND ACCUMULATING POSSESSIONS,
CONSIDER THE PEACE CORPS AS AN ALTERNATIVE
FOR TWO YEARS OF YOUR LIFE.

SHIDUKH SHUK
A "match-ups market-place"
where you can connect with some-
one who shares your interests.
Simply fill out your Shidukh
cards and look for others.
THE
8-9 p.m. Union Ballroom
DR. CONRAD GILES

SEE RECRUITERS:
For more information or
to arrange an interview
contact the Career Planning
and Placement Office TODAY.
Recruiters on campus January 23-25,
9 AM-5 PM each day.

EVENING

a

I

I I

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