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January 20, 1978 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-20

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Page 10-Friday, January 20, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Congress returns to unresolved energy dispute

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Con-
gress that adjourned with energy dis-
putes unresolved came back to them
yesterday, but with tax cuts and job
bills competing for its attention.
And a major item on the Senate
agenda is the vote on the Panama
Canal treaty giving control of the
waterway to Panama by the year
2000.
' AS THE 95TH Congress gathered

for its second and final session,
House Speaker Thomas "Tip"
O'Neill told reporters, "I am taking
the liberty" of assigning first priority
to legislation for economic stabiliza-
tion and reduction of unemployment.
That would include, he said, a tax
cut designed to stimulate the econ-
omy as well as public works and
other job-creating measures.
The Senate majority leader, Rob-
ert Byrd (D-W. Va.), seemed to indi-

cate a somewhat different order of
importance, with agreement on an
energy bill "our first major prior-
ity." But Byrd also listed economic
measures as having high priority.
O'NEILL REJECTED suggestions
that the Senate-House conferees try-
ing to break the impass on the key
issue of natural gas pricing might
throw up their hands and quit.
"We'll keep their feet to the

fire . . ." he said. "I think there will
be a more amiable feeling."
The Senate conferees are expected
to meet next week to see if they can
arrive at a unified position to take in
the full conference.
O'NEILL TOLD reporters he ex-
pects to see a tax reduction large
enough to offset Social Security tax
increases and expected energy taxes
and to give the economy a measur-

fl .

A

I AD

U

able boost. "Some tax reform" also
will be in the bill, he said.
The Humphrey-Hawkins bill to
commit the government to full
employment definitely is part of the
economic stimulus package, O'Neill
said, "and I think we can pass it."
Byrd listed among high priority
items Panama Canal treaties, jobs
Hughes
released;
landm--ark
case ends
LANSING (UPI) - Ingham Coun-
ty Circuit Judge Ray Hotchkiss
signed an order yesterday officially
releasing, Francine Hughes from
court jurisdiction - the last chapter
in a case viewed by feminists as a
landmark in the effort to protect
battered wives.
The 30-year-old Dansville mother
of four was found not guilty by reason
of temporary insanity Nov. 4 in the
torch slaying of her former husband,
whom she said had beaten and
threatened her repeatedly during
their marriage and even after they
separated.
SHE HAD BEEN accused of first
de'gree murder, and admitted setting
the fire that killed her ex-husband,
James.
After the acquittal, she was sent to
the state Forensic Center in Ypsilanti
where she underwent extensive psy-
chiatric testing. The center reported
to Hotchkiss that she did not require
hospitalization or further treatment,
and she was discharged Dec. 16.

House

impasse

i

and tax legislation and a measure to
curb the rise in hospital costs. Other
possibilities, he said, are welfare re-
form and a nuclear arms limitation
treaty, if negotiations succeed.
THERE ACTUALLY are two Pan-
ama Canal treaties but they are
considered indivisible.
While Byrd observed that, "The
tasks are many and the time is
short," O'Neill said he is "very, very
hopeful" that Congress will enact the
whole pending list of major items and
"We'll, keep their feet to
the fire . . . ," "Tip"
O'Neill on the Senate-

over

natural gas pricing."
adjourn by Oct. 1, well before the
November elections.
But the Senate Republican leader,
Sen. Howard Baker Jr. of Tennessee,
predicted "a controversial and yet
issue-oriented session."
"There will be a number of matters
that will create controversy and a
strong division in the Senate on both
sides of the aisle," Baker told
reporters.
Ford will,
continue
S. Africa.
o p erations
(Continued from Page 1)
FORD MOTOR CO., South Africa's
leading auto manufacturer, has in-
vested $127 million over the past 55
years. Its Port Elizabeth plant
expects to produce 55,000 cars, trucks
and tractors this year.
But Ford, board chairman of the
company founded by his grandfath-
er, said the company has "barely
shown a profit" over the past four
years and lost $8 million in 1977
because of what he described as
South Africa's depressed economic
conditions.
Car sales in South Africa were
down 22 per cent in 1977, Ford said,
but predictions for 1978 are for an
industrywide increase of six per cent
in car sales and eight per cent in
truck sales.
FOR MOST U.S. corporations, the
average rate of return on South
African investments in 1974 was 19.1
per cent, according to the U.S.
Commerce Department. Critics of
South Africa's apartheid system say
the profits are a result of low wages
paid to black workers.
Ford acknowedged that few
blacks were promoted to higher-pay-
ing jobs in the past because they had
not received sufficient training - 'a
fault of management and myself."
To upgrade the hiring of black and
mixed-race workers, Ford said he
has earmarked over $1 million in 1978
for training and more than $20,000 for
educational programs.
INSURANCE COSTS
NEW YORK (AP) - The average
size of an ordinary life insurance
policy bought by an American has
increased by more than four times
since 1920, climbing from $1,990 to
$8,750 in 1976, according to the
American Council of Life Insurance.
The sharpest increase, the coun-
cil's figures indicate, was between
1950 and 1976 when the price rose
from $2,320 to the current levels.
American families usually hold
more than one policy.

SAVE! HUNDREDS OF AUDIO COMPONENTS ARE
SPECIALLY LOW PRICED 10 AM TO 9 PM
THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "SATURDAY ONLY" BARGAINS:

GET MOVING,
AMERICA!
FREE
DELIVERY O0
PIZZA
Starts at S P.M.
7 Days a Week
from
BELL'S
GREEK PIZZA
S. State and
Packard Sts.
CALL
995-0232
Open 1 A.M. to 1 A.M.
Until 3 A.M. Fri. & Sot.

DELUXE FRONT-LOAD
DOLBY CASSETTE DECK
Vertical front-load. Dolby Noise
Reduction System. VU-meters,
auto-stop, left/right channel
record level controls. Name brand!
$116

PIONEER SX-450 AM/FM
15-WATT RECEIVER
Continuous power output 15 watts/
channel, min. RMS at 8 ohms, 20
to 20,000 Hz with no more than
0.5% total harmonic distortion.
'118

MARANTZ 2238 AM/FM
38-WATT RECEIVER
Continuous power output 38 watts/
channel, min. RMS at 8 ohms, 20
to 20,000 Hz with no more than
0.1% total harmonic distortion.
'2'15

PIONEER SA-950011
80-WATT AMPLIFIER
Continuous power output 80 watts/
channel, min. RMS at 8 ohms, 20
to 20,000 Hz with no more than
0.1% total harmonic distortion.
*286

PIONEER SX-1250
160-WATT RECEIVER
Continuous power output 160
watts/channel, min. RMS at 8 ohms,
20 to 20,000 Hz with no more than
0.1% total harmonic distortion.
'488

ANDEAN INDIAN
MUSIC
Doors open at 8:30, starts at 9:00
Fri., Sat., Jan. 20, 21
$3.00 I

i,
Ff'E'EH U
t42/ pyla
t

BSR 2260AG 3-SPEED
AUTOMATIC CHANGER
Features include anti-skate ad-
justment and stylus pressure. Cue
lever. Base, cover and magnetic
cartridge included. Auto. shutoff.
39

PIONEER PL-550
DIRECT-DRIVE SERVO
Tumtable features Quartz PLL ser-
vo system with high-torque motor.
One-stripe strobe speed control.
Howl-prevention cabinet, cover.

PIONEER RT-1011 L
10" OPEN REEL DECK
3-motor, 3-head system. Big 10-
inch professional type capacity.
Bias and equalizer selectors. Wow
& flutter; 0.08%(WRMS). Meters.

MARANTZ MODEL 12M
SPEAKERS LOW PRICED
Marantz performance and styling
at Highland's low price! Wood-
grain vinyl-clad enclosure features
deep sculptured grille design.

PIONEER HPM-40 3-WAY
40-WATT SPEAKER. BUY
Features include high efficiency
10-inch woofer, tweeter plus a
super tweeter. Crossover frequen-
cies; 4,000 Hz and 10,000 Hz.

'26

'77

EA.

EA.

, "-

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