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January 18, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-18

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10-Wednesday, January 18 1978-The Michigan Daily

SELECTION PROCESS MAY CHANGE:

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MSA to hold referendum

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By MARK PARRENT
Michigan Student Assembly last
night voted to hold a special campus-
wide referendum on a proposed amend-
ment altering the composition of the As-
sembly.
Central Student Judiciary (CSJ)
ruled the present composition of the
body unconstitutional, and an amend-
ment changing the composition was
passed in November. But CSJ ruled
that the composition called for by the

first amendment was also unconstitu-
tional, necessitating another amen-
dment.
CSJ ruled that the present unconsti-
tutional composition will be allowed to
continue until the regular elections in
April.
The special election is scheduled for
Wednesday, February 22.
Student General Council G.J. Di-
Giuseppe expects the special election to
cost $700 to $800, but said this was just
an estimate.

Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan

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Carol Burs: Female
lobbyist in male-D.C.

USE THIS HANDY CHART TO QUICKLY ARRIVE AT AD CC
WORDS 1 day 2 days 3 days 4 days 5 days 6 days addi.
0-10 1.15 2.30 3.05 3.80 4.55 5.30 .75
11-15 1.40 2.80 3.70 4.60 5.50 6.40 .90
' 16-20 1.65 3.30 4.35 5.40 6.45 7.50 1.05
21-25 1.90 3.80 5.00 6.20 7.40 8.60 1.20
26-30 2.15 4.30 5.65 7.00 8.35 9.70 1.35
31-35 2.40 4.80 6.30 7.80 9.30 10.80 1.50
36-40 2.65 5.30 6.95 8.60 10.25 11.90 1.65
41-45 2.90 . 5.80 7.60 9.40 11.20 13.00 1.80
46-50 3.15 6.30 8.25 10.20 12.15 14.10 1.95

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Please indicate
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(Continued from Page 1)
in 1970. At that time Burris was
working in a Pittsburg bookstore
until a local ERA activist asked her if
she would campaign for the bill in
Washington.
" IS SAID, 'what's that?', and she
told me, and I said, 'that's nice. I
don't know what it involves, but if it
means getting out of here, let's go!'."
The National Women's Lobby, Inc.,
the only orgainzation lobbying in
Washington solely for women's
causes is staffed by a handfull of full
time workers, each a legal expert in
areas such as ERA, child care and
employment. The organization is
operated on a shoestring budget, and-
Burris is proud of the fact that the
salary expenditures and the actual
cost of lobbying are nearly equal.
The lobby deals with all kinds of
legislation that affects women, but
according to Burris, is primarily con-
cerned with the issues of ERA and
abortion.
BURRIS CITES lack of informa-
tion in Congress as a major problem
with voting on abortion.
"You are bringing to a. Congress
who have never hadany education on
sexual issues, let alone abortion .
such an important issue."
The lobby, Burris notes, has a
"sort of League of Women Voters
philosophy", one that "everything is
amenable to rational thought."
BUT; SHE ADMITS that perhaps
this isn't always the best way.
"ERA is a cast study of how you
can get them (Congressmen) to do
something ... the only way at all to
describe ERA to them is to give them
a bottom-line issue: either you do
this, or you don't like women,"
Burris says.'
At the Residential College lecture,
addressing a seminar on "Political
Mobilization in America," Burris
told the class the only way to bring
meaningful change to women's legis-
lation is for women themselves to
become more active.
"GREEK AMERICANS went to
Washington and really cut off aid to
Turkey. Those who are opposed to
aid to Israel had just better retire

Seven words per line. Each group of characters counts as one word.
Hyphenated words over 5 characters count as two words-This includes telephone numbers.
Mail with Check to: Classifieds, The Michigan Daly
420 Maynard
Ann ArborMI 48109
NAMF
ADDRESS
CITY
PHONF J
S - T-E- - - -- ---- -

now. It's considered perfectly re-
spectable to support aid to Israel, in
the Congress it's almost an obliga-
tion. Mobilization can work.
"But w (women) don't think it's a
necessary thing to help women's
issues," Burris complains. "If we
don't do it, it won't get done."
At the lecture she also took some
time to chide Michigan Congressman
Carl Pursell (R), whom the lobby
lists as one of the. three top Anti-
abortion leaders in Congress.
"I THINK a group from the Uni-
versity should go and see him, and
talk about his abortion stand . . . he
has consistently voted to cut off all
Medicaid funded abortions, even for
dying mothers."
Pursell is one of three Congress-
men with elections in 1978 who have
been targeted for their position on
abortion.
Ultimately Burris sees both trouble
and hope in store for the National
Women's Lobby Inc., and for the
women's movement in general. In
some ways women are worse off now
than ever before; for instance,
according to Burns, women are
making only 56 cents for every dollar
men make, a ratio which is down
from 1967 when women made 64 cents
per dollar.
MOBILIZATION also seems to be a
key problem. As Burris says, "We're
spread very thin, and that rpakes us
very vulnerable in Congress.
She is quick to emphasize, how-
ever, that the women's movement
has not stagnated; things have been
done, however much more is left to
do.
Burris, who attended the National
Women's Conference in Houston late
last year, said the conference
sparked hope for the future.
"I felt a great sense of unified goals
there ... it was an end to the perni-
cious rumors that we were dead.
and thirdly, it was great that there
was such an incredible range of
women of every size and shape and
color and age," Burris said.
Traver
Knoli rent
increased
sets the levels of rent arbitrarily.
Resident Sharon Quinn said some
tenants who live in apartments iden-
tical to hers pay as much as $20 more
monthly rent. Other tenants, how-
ever, pay less than she does while
living in identical apartments.
"Did the landlady like the way you
looked when you came in?" asked
Quinn. "Obviously not for me. I'm
paying $50 more than other tenants
and there's no rhyme or reason to it."
ANOTHER complaint of striking
tenants is the way court cases have
been consolidated in recent 'months.
Instead of cases being handled one at
a time, as many as five are being
heard at one time to expedite the
court procedure.
"It's confusing for a jury when it
gets five cases at once," said Quinn.
"This whole Traver Knoll situation is
somewhat perplexing . . . it makes
people think it's not worth speaking
out for your rights."

The composition has been ruled not in
accordance with the All-Campus Con-
stitution several times because it has
not given equal weight to the vote of stu-
dents of the University's various
schools and colleges.
The final form of the amendment has
yet to be written, but MSA will submit-
the final form to CSJ for a ruling on its
constitutionality before it is placed on
the ballot.
In other MSA developments, CSJ yes-
terday afternoon ordered office space
to be reallocated to the Organization of
Arab Students. The student group had
been denied the reassignment by the
Student Organizations Board (SOB)
last September after SOB officials
discovered the office to be left an "utter
mess" over the summer according to
Student General Counsel DiGiuseppe.
CSJ ruled in favor of the organization
because "there'were no written guide-
lines," said Justice Thomas Potter.
"They weren't given a chance to come
into compliance (with the implied
guidelines)," added Potter.
The tiny principality of Liechen-
stein, nestled between Switzerland
and Austria, relies on 100,000 stand-
ing orders for each of the 20 new
stamps it issues annually. Seventy
countries regularly request the
stamps, says the National Geograph-
ic Society.
Coalitions
opposes
Panama-
treaties
MIAMI (AP) - Members of a con-
servative coalition launched a na-
tional campaign against the Panama
Canal treaty Tuesday, to put pressure
on Florida's two senators to 'vote
against the pact when it comes up for
ratification.
About 200 persons gathered near
the Miami airport to hear the
Committee to Save the Panama
Canal.
IN REPLY TO questions, Sen. Paul
Laxalt, (R-Nev.), urged listeners to
put pressure on Florida Sens. Lawton
Chiles and Richard Stone, both
Democrats who are uncommitted on
the treaty, in hopes of getting the 4
votes needed to block ratification.
The treaty would gradually turn
over control of the Canal Zone and its
waterway to Panama by the year
2000.
Laxalt and about a dozen other
senators, congressmen and ex-mili-
tary leaders flew here from Washing-
ton on the first leg of a campaign to
counter Carter administration sup-
port for the treaty.
THE COMMITTEES which has
proclaimed itself the "truth squad,"
is being financed through $100,000'in
contributions from eight organiza-
tions.
Laxalt said the fate of the pact in
the Senate hinges on possible amend-
ments.
"That is the unanswered question,
but as far as we're concerned, there
is no amendment that would be
acceptable, short of one that keeps
U.S. jurisdiction over the canal,"
'Laxalt said.
The speaker brought with him a
manila envelope he said was filled
with items for review with the Presi-

dent. The meeting was called to go
over the congressional agenda for the
upcoming session.
Besides O'Neill, Carter held indi-
vidual sessions with Rep. Morris
Udall, (D-Ariz.), a luncheon guest;
Rep. Al Ullman, (D-Ore.), chairman
of the House Ways -and Means
Committee that will act first on the
tax proposals, and Sen. Howard
Cannon, (D-Nev.), who has a major
role in considering administration
and other plans for airline deregula-
tion.

'State of Union' to

unveil tax
(Continued from Page 2)
bers of Congress that action on ener-
gy legislation was "an all-pervading
influence."
"While it is in abeyance, the influ-
ence is basically negative in the atti-
tude of the business community, the
confidence of the people, the value of
the dollar overseas, and the concern
of our allies and friends throughout
the world concerning the global con-
sumption of imported oil," Carter

proposals
and sophomore members of Con-
gress in the State Dining Room, he
chatted in the Oval Office with House
Speaker Tip O'Neill, who told him,
"certainly we're going to get an ener-
gy bill."
Carter praised the work of the
House in approving energy legisla-
tion last August, saying "the House
did their work."
THE ENERGY legislation is being
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