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January 17, 1978 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-17

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AW

Page 8-Tuesday, January 17, 1978-The Michigan Daily
DO RE MI FA SO LA FREE THROW

Borders Book Shop and Thomson-Shore Publishers, Inc. in
Association with Bill Haney Enterprises Cordially Invite You
to Attend a Party in Celebration of the Publication of Jeff
Mortimer's
Pigeo
B d100yNoses
and Little
Skinny Kids
A Story of Wolverine Basketball

t
r

Blue
By HENRY ENGELHARDT
A lesson in Wolverine economics:
there is no such thing as a free throw.
Saturday afternoon Michigan lost to
Illinois 65-61, a four point spread. The
Wolverines took 12 shots from the free
throw line but hit only three. If they had
hit eight of 12 they would be 4-0 in Big
Ten play today.
In Michigan's first 11 games it hit 66
per cent of its charity tosses. All it had
to do was match that percentage to win
the game. But alas, it's Tuesday and
the Wolverines are 3-1.
Tommy Staton aptly analyzed the
free throw situation. "We missed
them," he said.
It is, as Staton alludes, a rather black
and white situation. Either a free throw
is good or it's not. Or if the shooter
drops the ball behind his back, a la In-
diana's Butch Carter, the free throw is
bizarre.
It is strange how something titled
"free throw" could be so costly. But the
Wolverines are not moping over the
problem. "We're really a good shooting
team," said Joel Thompson. "Most

foul-si1
guys hit in practice, sometimes 90 per
cent. I don't know what happened."
Dave Baxter, hitting over 70 per cent
of his freebies, feels he and his mates
are unnecessarily pressured at the foul.P
line. "We don't miss on purpose," the
senior co-captain said. "We've been
knocked by everybody. We're constan-
tly having to prove ourselves rather
than just concentrating on the game."
Coach Johnny Orr, a little bemused,
just shook his head. "Our attitude was
terrific, it was not a lack of concen-
tration. We just didn't happen to make
them.
"We were leading the Big Ten in free
throw shooting after three games," Orr
noted, "of course we've dropped out of
there now."
Unlike Baxter, Orr does not feel his
squad is under abnormal pressure.
"There's always pressure-every
game. Every game now is the biggest
game of the year," he said.
Perhaps it is the coaches, not the
players, who face abnormal pressure.
Administrative assistant Dan Fife, who
played for three years under Orr, ex-

i

plained. "As a player you played or
fun. It wasn't do or die. But as a coach
it's your job to win games."
While the coaches are very pleased
with the team's progress thus far, they
are by no means getting complacent. At
practice yesterday they added some
new plays to the Wolverine offense.
"The new plays give' us more
freedom," said Staton. "(One play ad-
ded) is a one-on-one play to take advan-
tage of our best attributes."
Staton pointed out that Michigan has
scored less than'70 points in its last
three games, not so hot for a team
averaging over 80 in its first nine con-
tests. "We just stopped executing," he
said. "But against Minnesota and Iowa
we got away with it."
Michigan also hit its free throws in
those games. Oh yeah, in practice
yesterday the players each shot 50
times from the foul line instead of the
usual 30.
WOLVERINE TALES: Johnny John-
son has a cold or possibly the flu and in-
stead of practice yesterday he went to
the hospital to be examined . . . Dave

~ke y
Baxter is averaging 6.6 assists a game,
if he continues at this pace he will shat-
ter Dan Fife's record of 139 (set during
the 70-71 season) by about 40 assists.
-APopwe

Meet the author and some of the players and coaches
Who Became UM Sports Legends and National Sports
Figures
Thursday, January 19 at Borders Book Shop
4:30 to 6p.m. 303 South State Street

1. Kentucky (46)................. 12-0
2. Marquette..................... 12-1
3. UCLA..... .............. ...... 13-1
4. Indiana State...................12-0
(tie) DAILY LIBELS.............12-0
5. North Carolina................. 13-2
6. Arkansas .................... .. 14-1
7. Notre Dame....................8.3
8. Kansas................ .......13-2
9. Louisville.....................10-2
10. Michigan State ..................12-1
11.Syracuse......................12-2
12. Providence.................. .... 13-1
13. Virginia......................
14. Holy Cross....................11-1
15. Texas .......................... 12-2
16. Nevada-Las Vegas............... 15-2
17. Duke ........................... 12-3
18. DePaul...........13-1
19. Georgetown, D.C................12-2
19. New Mexico..........f...........10-2

920
808
613
576
576
538
457
324
,311
305
251
187
1731
129
126
91
88
63
60
58
42

_ie

CLEARANCE! ON
MEN'S
LEATHER
TOP BOOTS

WOMEN SET FOUR SCHOOL MARKS:
Records tumble, tumblers fall

By JEFF FRANK
If the late king of rock and roll had
been present, perhaps he would call his
song Heartbreak Arena. But while
Elvis made records, the women's gym-
nastics team spent Sunday breaking
them before falling short of beating
Chicago-Circle, 128.75-128.6, at Crisler
Arena.
The tumblers smashed four varsity
Sceaetce
College Basketball
Kentucky 76, Mississippi 56
Virginia 83, Penn St. 56
N. Illinois 77, Bowling Green 65
Mississippi Si.70, Tennessee 68
Rutgers 75, Lehigh 62 ,
Dayton 97, Tenn-Chattanooga 68
GOLF-Phoenix Open
Miller Barber .................. ..... 272 - $40,000
Lee Trevino .......................... 273 -$18,500
Jerry Pate ...................... .... 273 - $18,500
Rod F unseth..................... ..... 274- $9,400
Arnold Palmer ............. .......... 275 - $8,200

records during the meet in a valiant at-
tempt to make up a two-point deficit
which stared them in the face after the
completion of the vaulting competition.
INCLUDED in the record book on-
slaught were team records on the
balance beam and floor exercise, while
128.6 added nearly two points to the
team's previous top score.
Sophomore Sara Flom completed the
assault by raising her uneven bars
record by .1 for the second time this
season, with a score of 8.5.
Flom almost added a fifth record to
the collection, with her first place all-
around score of 32.95, just below her
varisty mark of 33.0.
THE RECORDS sound good, but the
team was keenly disappointed at losing
to the Chikas. Coach Anne Cornell
called it a heartbreaker, but appeared
pleased with the teams scores.
"It was a good meet, we did a fine
job," she said. "They're a fine team,
our scores just didn't rise fast enough."
Among the many excellent routines,
perhaps the balance beam routines
stand out. Freshperson Colleen For-
restel successfully performed an aerial
en route to her third place finish and an
8.1 score. Linda Watson followed with
an 8.2 for second on her routine about
which she said, "It's the first time I hit

that routine in collegiate competition."
WATSON, a beam and bars special-
ist, was quite happy with the team's
performance. "We wanted to win, and
when we fell behind we started psych-
ing ourselves up," she said. "We knew
we had to beat them on floor (exercise),
and everyone tried to put out more."
Put out more they did as, paced by
Ginger Robey's first place score of 8.6,
the tumblers scored 34.1 points to set
the record and close the deficit to its

final margin.
Assistant coach Don McElreath
summed up the team's showing. "We
were weak in vaulting. We need to work
on maximum difficulty vaults," he
commented. "The beam routines were
fantastic. It was a complete surprise."
"The team did great! We can break
130," Enthused freshperson all-around-
er Katie Zobler. "We hurt ourselves on
vaulting and (uneven) bars. We're gon-
na do better."

Grapplers split spoils;
hampered by injuries,

By BOB WARREN
The wilds of Evanston, Illinois was
the site of the battle. Michigan
general Billy Johanessen pulled to-
gether his walking and limping
wounded wrestling Wolverines to
tangle with a herd of Buffaloes and a
pack of Wildcats. The Wolverines
were able to corral the Buffaloes of
Colorado, 35-12, but they could not
overcome the claws of the North-
western Wildcats, who wons29-18.
The Wolverines out-muscled the

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Buffaloes as they won seven,.of ten
matches. Sophomore Dan Richard
won his first match by a forfeit and
Dennis Bauer, who worked hard all
week to make the difficult transition
from his regular 177 pound class to
190, won his first start at Michigan by
an 11-3 decision.
Other winners against Colorado in-
cluded freshman Bill Konovsky, who
won an eight to two decision as he
returned to his home Chicago area,
and heavyweight Steve Bennett who
won by a fall. Captain Karl Briggs;
Steve Fraser and Mark Churella all
won their matches' against Colorado
and Northwestern.
"We could have lost both meets,
but these guys were able to stay off
their backs and we should have won
against Northwestern," commented
Johanessen.
Although Michigan devastated Col-
orado it could not maintain the same
ferociousness to cage the Wildcats.
"After great matches by Todd
Schneider, Briggs, Churella and
Fraser, I though we could win with
Bennett at the big weight. However,
he got pinned and we , could not
contain Northwestern's star Al Mar-
zano at 190, Russ Reglarz, Alex
Ricconmini or the Greenky broth-
ers," Johanessen said.
As it turns out Michigan once again
is suffering from more injuries as the
wilds of Evanston were too much for
sophomore Lou Joseph whose shoul-
der is suffering from 'Cat-induced
internal bleeding.
Yes, Michigan's wrestling team is
mired deep in a jungle of despair and
injury. Yet, the performance this
weekend showed that there may be a
path out of the grapplers' jungle as
some of Michigan's young warriors
came through with promising per
formances.
Wings
retire
Giacomin'
DETROIT - Ed Giacomin has
been retired by the Detroit Red
Wings, the wife of the veteran
National Hockey League goaltender
confirmed yesterday.
Detroit General Manager Ted
Lindsay told the 38-year-old netmind-
er Sunday that the Red Wings no
longer needed him in an on-ice
capacity, Mrs. Giacomin said..

Who are
you, tellingjs
us how
to run our
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It takes a lot of confidence to come
fresh out of school and begin telling us
how to do things.
On the other hand, it takes an un-
usual company to provide the kind of
environment where that can happen, but
that is exactly the environment you'll find
at Scott Paper.
We constantly search for people
who have the ability to respond to chal-
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with the initiative and desire to seek al-
ternatives, the skill and courage to con-
vince others that there are better ways
and who aren't afraid to express their
ideas. ,g
At Scott, we admire an aggressive

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