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September 07, 1972 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 7, 1972

TFI''t MICHIGAN DAIL'i

Page Seven

i

Thursday, .September 7, 1972 THL MICHIGAN DAIL1

artists gather
for local fair

barefootin
down to concerts

By LORIN LABARDEE
It was a true community ef-
fort when Ann Arbor hosted
its 13th annual street fair last
July. The streets were crowded
by anyone with any interest in
art, sidewalk sales, music or
antiques - and this included
just about everyone.
The most widely known name
for this conglomeration of ac-
tivities is the Ann Arbor Street
Art Fair. This covers the "of-
ficial" art fair sponsored by
the S. University Businessmen's
Association, the Ann Arbor Art
Association, the Chamber of
Commerce, and the University.
But it doesn't include the Free
Art Fair which features stu-
dent exhibitors. Nor does it in-
elude the merchants who bring
their wares out into the street,
nor another significant part of
the festivities, an antique show.
The "official" art fair is the
oldest of all the events. While
in 1959 it included less than
100 artists, this past July over
250 artists showed their work.
Those who came to the fair
could not help but find some-
thing of interest. Every imagin-
able form of artwork was dis-
played. Items as varied as
jewelry, macrame, log sculp-
tures, engraved leather goods,
weaving, watercolors and seri-
graphs.
Many of the artists in the
Street Art Fair were from
Michigan but a large number
came from out-of-state, some
as far away as Montana and
Canada.
Just as important and often
more informal was the Free
Art Fair, dominated by Uni-
versity students and faculty.
This year over 350 people par-
ticipated in the student fair
and even more would have join-
ed them if it had not been for a
lack of space.
The free fair was co-sponsor-
ed by the University Activities

Center (UAC) and the Office of
Special Services and Programs
(OSSP ) Together they or-
ganized the distribution of dis-
play sites, publicity, entertain-
ment and sanitation services.
The need for two art fairs
at the same time may seem il-
lusive, but Tom Clark, one of
the OSSP coordinators, of the
Free Art Fair explained that
'The free fair is to give mem-
bers of the University an op-
portunity to exhibit their work."
He went on to add that the
Street Art Fair is not suitable
for this because its organizers
employ a tight jury ,system and
require a $25 registration fee.
' In contrast to the Street Art
Fair's entrance requirements,
the free fair does not ask the
artist to pass a jury and re-
quires only -a $1 entrance fee.
Although a high level of com-
petition would be expected be-
tween the two fairs, Clark re-
ports that there was much
c'ooperation between the organ-
izers of the fairs.
Problems of interest to both
fairs, such as traffic flow and
services, have been settled in
meetings between the two
groups.
After viewing nearly 1,000 dif-
ferent varieties and versions of
art the end is still not in sight.
There is still the antique show.
And when the crowds became
too much to take and the heat
became unbearable there were
the local bands to sit back, re-
lax, and enjoy. One music
store sponsored budding rock
talent on a scaffolding on State
St. and at night UAC sponsored
names such as Meadowmuffin,
Stone School Road and Laby-
rinth on People's Plaza.
Entertainment was also to be
viewed on the lawn of the
Physics and Astronomy Build-
ing. The Office of Equal Op-
portunity performed a number
of ensembles an 1 other music
was also to be enjoyed.

Crowds of area residents
were again "barefootin' down,"
to free Sunday rock concerts
this summer.
Organized by the Community
Park Program, the concerts
were held at the site of the
1970 Ann Arbor Blues Festival,
adjacent to Huron High School.
This past summer marked the
fourth consecutive year that
free rock concerts have been
held in the city.
Affiliated with the Anr4 Ar-
bor Tribal Council, a network
of comnmunity - oriented or-
ganizations, the community
Park Program sponsored a to-
tal of twelve concerts.
All performers appeared at
their own expense. Former-
ly, optional donations have been
used to cover maintenance and
service expenses. This year the
city agreed to help finance the
concerts and allocated $4,000
dollars from its budget to help

cover the service expenses of
garbage collection, parking, as
well as the sound system and
staging.
Fresh organic rice, veketables,
watermelon, fruit juices, and
corn on the cob were sold at the
concerts.
Free concerts were'also spon-
sored by the program for one
hour each week on People's
Plaza.
EUROPE $130
Two full months of un-
limited student Eurailpass
travel.
Nat. Bank of Ypsilanti
TRAVEL BUREAU
611 W. Cross St., Ypsilanti
PHONE 483-8556

at the movies @00

By LINDA DREEBAN
The familiar Wednesday after-
noon institution of "Ladies Day"
has died, giving way to "Bar-
gain Day." All Ann Arbor movie-
goers can now see local Wednes-
day matinees for the bargain
price of only 75 cents.
According to the manager of
the State Theatre, Fred Carl,
the State, Michigan, Campus,
Wayside and 'U' D;ive-in thea-
ters made the change after the
State Legislature passed a bill
barring discrimination in public
accommodations;
"I guess we could have ex-
pected it with women's libera-
tion and all," he said. "This way
it's fair. Everyone can come."
Although many entertainment
establishments around the state
have changed their "Ladies
Day" policies, some, like Tiger
Stadium still offer reduced
rates to women, children and
senior' citizens.
The bill, which Gov. William

ay

dies

Milliken signed into law in April,
entitles all persons to "full and
equal protection" with regard to
all accommodations, restaurants.
theaters, and all other places of
amusement and recreation. The
bill further stipulates that all
people have access to these fa-
cilities at a "uniform price."
When the legislature consider-
ed a similar bill last January,
State Atty. Gen. Frank Kelley
ruled that, if read literally, the -
bill would eliminate all admis-
sicn discounts based on sex. Al-
though Kelley has not issued a
ruling on the bill approved by
the legislature, a spokesperson
in the attorney general's office
said the bills are "similar enough
so that the first ruling probably
-is not negated."
Tiger Stadium managers, how-
ever, seem unconcerned with
the implications of the law for
their admission policy. Women,
children under 14 and senior
citizens can watch the Detroit

Tigers at a reduced rate every
Saturday that the team plays
in Detroit.
Regarding the legality of
"Ladies Day," a spokesperson
for the stadium said. "Someone
would have to challenge it by
filing a complaint. If we were
found guilty, we'd have to pay
a penalty."
The penalty set by the law is
$100. In addition, establishments
which hold state licenses risk
having their licenses revoked if
found guilty of violating the law.
Women are no longer admitted
for free to the Tuesday night
races at Wolverine H a r n e s s
Raceway in Livonia.
"We had to do it or we would
have lost our racing license,
a spokesperson said. "I don't see
any reason for banning 'Ladies
Day' but obviously the legisla-
ture does."
HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE IT!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
2 SHOPS
0 611 E. University
* 615 E. Liberty
asola b Barbers

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._--

A ~TheIf~'~
ann ,rbI
BLUES -&JA ZZ
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WELCOME

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FRESHMEN:
If you don't
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MILFS DAVIS

OTIS RUSH

BOBBY "BLUE" BLAND

ITS AL

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ti n

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SUN RA SElGAL-SCHWALL BLUES BAND
CHARLES MINGUS JR. WALKER & THE ALL-STARS

rig

FREDDIE KING

LUTHER ALLISON

too

much for your

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THOUSANDS OF USED
at up to 33%% off
AND
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* SHEET MUSIC
classical & popular
* STUDY SCORES
* OPERA SCORES
AT THE

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HOUND DOG TAYLOR & THE HOUSE ROCKERS
MIGHTY JOE YOUNG with LUCILLE SPANN
& ma"yo"ther Blues & Jazz Artists
3 DAYS -5 SHOWS
Friday-Saturday-Sunday September 8-9-10
OTIS SPANN MEMORIAL FIELD
(next to Huron High School) Ann Abor, Michigan
.411 f',- n,Stibieci to hrnge
SERIES TICKET $15.00 ALL SHOWS
Rainbow Giphio,
TIC KETOUTLETS Michigan Union, Salvation Records (330 Maynard & 1103 S. University) Ned's
Books (Ypsilanti), and by mail from Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival, Box 381, Ann Arbo, Mich. 48107
TLjuimci/d cie offer Ticket .alcs s ill be linited to Wash-
tenaw (.Ozn/y areaIfun/il Ant,,rtl . )Id O y $ 15.W),/Cs
tickel wiuill 1e aviail a/b/e Miailf/iat/ dale.
Number of series tickets at $1 5 per ticket
Total enclosed
NAME
ADDRESS

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