100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1972 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Page Tert

THE MfCHGAN. DAILY

Wednesday, Oecerober 13{ t972 Wednesday, December 13, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Ten TH~ MiCHiGAN DAILY Wednesday, December 131 1 97Z Wednesday, December 13, 1972

N.
-'a

QUART OF FAYGO RED POP
FREE
With any Medium, Large or

1 '

VI

books -
A garden of holiday cooking dei

'...}..
J:

FvfrrrI rdrrro 1)(77tV

LX it

WEDN
769-8030

ra-L~uay r i.zU
ESDAY, DEC. 1 3, '72
Free Delivery

f

ski=-

Our Best Wishes for a Joyous Holiday Season
17
PIERCER EARRINGS in Sterling,
G1#d-Ffled, and 14 Karat Gold.-
From $3.50
1-
17
e
SIXT EEN N ICKE LS ARCADE

The Young Poet
by Donald Hall
Images leap you from branch to branch. Your eyes
brighten, your head cocks. You pause under a green
bough, alert.
And when I look at you I want to hide you in the
bullrushes.
The other wood is past the hill. But you will enter
it and find the particular maple. You will walk through
the door of the maple. Juices will bubble from your eyes
and your mouth.
There is nothing to do.
It occurs to me that the greatest gentleness would
put a bullet into your bright eye. And when I look in your
eye, it is not your eye that I see.
Canning Poem
by Linda Parker Silverman
She is sealed away
like packed fruit
floating inside a jar
labeled August.
Her body
a white furnace
purifying itself
incorporating its own scars
after losing love
upstairs in an iron bed.
They told her it
was only a goat man
steering the wheels
behind the mountain
who wanted to cover
her sense of holiness
in a sheepskin coat.
A white dress
hangs in the window
transparent and flowered
and the girl who wore it
it's dead.
It rains
without flowering
inside the jar.
Mom .
by Simone Press
for your ninth birthday
your ngother got you a plot
near the Beth Israel Cemetery
she didn't tell you
in a matter of fact way
she said
along with this
toy truck
we bought you a home

Mmmmm A FEASTIARY, by
Ruth Reichl. Holt, Rinehart and
Winston, $3.95.
By BARBARA SUROVELL
Ruth Reichl has written a book,
a fantastic and delightful book.
Anyone who lives in Ann Arbor
will take special pleasure in it
because it is full of Ann Arbor
landmarks and nostalgia:ArIn
Ann Arbor there was a beautiful,
wrinkled old man who sold sweet
potato pies . . . the Egg Lady
in Ann Arbor is perfectly egg-
like, bearing a remarkable re-
semblance to her wares.a.
Ralph's Market, the local rob-
ber baron."
Mmmm is about the pleasures
of the flesh: a cookbook. Now
there are two kinds of cook-
books. One is comprehensive, en-
cyclopedic. It attempts thorough-
ness either of cooking in gen-
eral (like the New York Times
Cookbook, or the fare of one
country or region, or of a par-
tic''lar food, such as meat or
bread.
The other kind of cookbook is
a record of one person's culinary
experience. It is idiosyncratic,
unique. It makes no effort to be
complete. This second kind of
cookbook is completely individ-
ual; only Ruth could have written
Mmmmm. The recipes are ones
that she has tried or invented,
and that she likes. The notes and
reminiscences make the choices
even more personal and interest-
ing to read.
Mmmm reminds me of another
cookbook, The Alice B. Tokas
Cookbook. You may'never make
a single dish from that one but it
is still worth having because it
is such fun to read. The re-
cipesuare the sortthathbegin
by telling you to slaughter a
squab and pluck it and while I'.1
all for authenticity in cooking,
that's going a bit far. Perhaps if
Picasso were a regular dinner
guest (as he was for Alice),
I would learn to deal with live
squab. Alice B. Toklas tells is
lots of stories about him in her
book, anecdotes you would hear
no where else.
And, just so, Mmmmi, is a
book worth having because it is
a pleasure to read and to
look at. Unlike the Alice B. Tok-
las Cookbook its recipes are use-
ful and likely to be used. They
are realistic and delicious. "I
mistrust people who don't like
to eat . . . but even more I dis-
trust those who don't know what
they like to eat." If you are in-
different to food, this book is
guaranteed to turn you on. Ruth
is a raving sensualist; listen to
the way she describes a fresh
fig:
"Figs are soft green and
bland looking on the outside,
but it is only a disguise for the
orange-red passion that I i e s
within. Figs grow ripe and
heavy until they can't contain
themselves any longer, and the
inner flesh pushes against the
soft outside and bulges against
it, until it bursts open. Then
the fig is ready for the pluck-
ing. I dare you to try and eat
a fig without having erotic fan-
tasies."
There is a chapter on "F a t
Food for Lean Times," how to
eat well and imaginatively when
you don't have much cash. There
is also a chapter of spectacular
feasts. Don't make the mistake
of thinking that money alone will
make a good dinner. It takes tal-
ent, talent and taste. There are
also chapters for each season of
the year, with long introductions
that go far beyond notions like
good, hearty soups for winter
and crisp salads for summed. She
really gets into each season.
One of the best chapters is
Family Recipes. This is the

Barbara Surovell is a frequent
contributor to The Daily Books
Page.

the style, as well as the recipes
themselves add up to a delightful
experience. See for yourself. It
will renew your senses before
winter closes its grip on all of
us,
THE NEW YORK TIMES HER-
ITAGE COOKBOOK, by J e a n
Hewitt. Putnam, $12.95.

Pat Oleszko as Christmas tree

By PAT BAUER
The New York Times Heritage
Cookbook is a lot like the Times
itself: fat, gray, expensive, and
jammed full of information (much
of it irrelevant but all of it
interesting).
Written by Times Food Report-
er Jean Hewitt, the book boasts
more than 2,100 quasi-historic re-
cipes collected from g r a n d-
mothers, grange halls, county
fairs, and festivals around t h e
country. This all-encompassing
approach - which took Hewitt
five years to complete - makes
the book itself more of a ;ulinary
geography lesson than a practical
course in cooking. It is interest-
ing to note, for example, that
rose jelly is made extensively in
Missouri, but it is quite another
thing to crawl out of the house
at 6 aim. to gather the "8 cups
wild, unsprayed rose petals" re-
quired to complete the recipe.
The charm of the book it its
close attention to detail. Each
recipe is sorted according to
state as well as geographic re-
gion, and has complete, accur-
ate, step-by-step directions on
how to make everything from re-
indeer burgers to dandelion wine.
Unfortunately, what the b o o k
doesn't have is an editor's note
before the more out-of-the-way re-
cipes assuring the reader that

cream of the crop of treasures
from friends. Here you will find
Joe Wehrer's Fried Salad, Mrs.
Oleszko's Peach Fritters and
other prized delights.
Mentioning Mrs. Aleszko brings
me to my favorite part of this
book, the pictures. There are
photographs and drawings of all
sorts. There is one picture o- Pat
Oleszko outside MacDonald's
that alone is worth the price of
the book. It you have never seen
Pat, as Pat the Hippy Stripper, r;r
in any of her other costumes, be

sure to check out these picture:;.
If you have seen her, then you
will like them even more. She
is another Ann Arbor happen-
ing who has also, alas, decamp-
ed to New York.
We are told that the French
call mushrooms "assassins de
beurre" - butter killers. Then
we are presented with a series
of cartoon drawings showing a
mushroom "assassinating" a
stick of butter. Very sinister and
very funny.
The pictures, the stories and

17
17
17
17
17
1717
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17 ___ ~.i-~~'~I;<
17 ,-
17 V -~
17
207 E. Liberty
I

the food i
ble. I a
one read
before att
custard,
cado me=
sage cak~
such intl
lean siu
drops, an
And it
magine
oysters'
es' testi'
Hewitt h
calves't
at roundi
calves a
nue mar
42d stree
her lang'
In bete
ual delic
cipes for
this co"i
things li
gravy an
and shoo
land. Ani
recipes
America
kin.
The N
Cookbook
Nor is it
small Po
edules. D
volve ex
lengthy
geograph
food. its
have to
(mi
IF'
G
1P
FO I

17 stc

-MADE THINGS.
343 Maynard
(in alley across from Centicore)
House plants & Bonsai grown with Love.
Crafts HAND-MADE by the people of Ann Arbor
-7 Special pleasures for you & for giving

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan