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December 13, 1972 - Image 13

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-13
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)age Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V1/ednesday, December 13, 1972

Supplement to The Michigan Daily

. ,- .,

||||| Twelve THE|MICHIGAN|DAILY|Wednesday,|December 13, 1972 Supplement to The Michigan-Dail

ROUNDUP CONCLUDED
Soviet dissent group weah

By VINCENT BUIST
Moscow (Reuter) - Segments
of the Soviet political under-
ground - including Fighters for
Civil . Liberties - today appear
-demoralized and rudderless fol-
lowing a systematic one-year
roundup of dissenters by thous-
ands of agents of the Soviet Se-
curity Police, he K.G.B.
The Dissenters-or the Demo-
cratic Movement as many pre-
fer to be called - have over the
past four or five years achieved
world-wide publicity with their
reports of conditions inside So-
viet political camps.
They have sought to stir the
conscience of the Soviet leader-
ship, and to gain broad backing
among liberal groups in Western
countries by appeals - some
smuggled out of the Soviet Union
- for observance of civil liber-
t i e s, especially freedom o f
Sspeech.
But in Moscow one of the most
active promoters of the dissent-
ers' case - a man described by
his friends as a professional re-
volutionary - says: "It's fin-
ished . ."
Yet another active campaign-
er commented sadly: "We have
failed . . . there is no basis of
support for us from the people."
And one of the most famous of
all the campaigners, Andrei Sak-
harov, 32, a full member of the
prestigious Soviet Academy of
Sciences who helped devise and
perfect the first Russian hydro-
gen bomb, now acknowledges to
visitors: "It is senseless, we have
changed nothing . ..
Sakharov has embraced all
causes involving liberty, includ-
King that of Jewish emigration to
Israel although he himself is not
a Jew.
Long before the dissenters'
campaign in the Soviet Union
gained recognition abroad, Sak-
harov was penning personal let-
ters of protest to the Soviet lead-
ers as far back as the 1950s, urg-
ing a halt to atom bomb tests.
He was a rounding member of
the unofficial Soviet committee
on human rights, and still feels
passionately about the need for
intellectual freedom, themain-
tenance of moral values among
political leaders and - above all
-- simple respect for rights al-
ready written into the Soviet con-
stitution.
In addition to the mood of pes-
simism and futility which has
seized individuals in the dissent-

ers' movement, there is a steady
erosion of the leadership, either
by imprisonment and death or by
emmigration.
Many of the most active dis-
senters are now in Israel, having
won the right to emigrate after
years of struggle.
Not long ago, news reached
Moscow that Yuri Galanskov,
a poet who was tried in Mos-
cow in January, 1968, for anti-
Soviet activities and sentenced to
seven years in a labor camp, had
died.
Galanskov suffered from stom-
ach ulcers and died following an
operation in the camp performed
by a doctor who was not a sur-
geon, but a fellow inmate.
One of the greatest blows to the
active dissenters movement oc-
curred in June this year when
Pyoir Yakir, a burly shock-haired
man of 49 who had trumpeted his
convictions on civil liberties wtih-
out much concern for his own
safety, was arrested.
As a young man, Yakir spent
17 years in prison camps-where
he taught himself history-and
was released and rehabilitated in
1954 folowing the death of Stalin
the previous year.
During the Khrushchev years,
in the late 1950s and early 1960s,
Yakir was feted as an example
of the new era of socialist le-
gality introduced together with
the de-Stalinization campaign.
But on the afternoon of June
21, when Yakir walked out of his
workplace at lunch time, he was
bundled into a car and driven off.
An hour later K.G.B. officials
fetched Yakir's wife from her
workplace and searched the Ya-
kir aparment for the third time
this year, apparentlyseeking
proof of anti-Soviet activities.
Yakir's K.G.B. interrogation
apparently has been non-violent.
His physical condition is describ-
ed as not bad.
Whatever the exact truth of the
Yakir story, his disappearance
has been yet another blow to the
political protest movement in the
Soviet Union.
There are rumors that Yakir
may be used as the star witness
in a trial calculated by the au-
thorities to deal one final fatal
blow to the movement, by trying
to characterize is as a treacher-
ous group more concerned with
discrediting the Soviet nation
abroad than fighting for the de-
velopment of socialism at home.
But although the fortunes of he

dissidents are at a very low ebb,
t h e "Chronicle o f Current
Events" as the underground po-
litical newspaper which serves
as an outlet for all sectors of the
movement-has continued to ap-
pear.
The only sign of strain was the
fact that the last issue, number
27, reached Western hands two
weeks late.
This typed underground news-
paper, known here as Samizdat
(self-published), has been appear-
ing for some four years, at first
it seemed to be a vehicle for
distributing poems, stories and
novelties banned by the Soviet
censor.
But over the years, by the sim-
ple practice of recording the fate
of protesters who have been con-
demned to labor camps or exile,
it has assumed the form of an
opposition underground newspa-
per.
It serves to combine the vari-
ous strands of dissent in the So-
viet Union - Jews pressing for
free emigration to Israel, writers
and poes seeking freedom of ex-
pression, civil and human rights
campaigners, and minorities
seeking to redress injustice, win
rehabilitation and restore their
homelands.
Soviet security agents pounced
on the dissident movement early
this year after a period of rela-
tive quiet and apparent indeci-
sion.
But for over four years the So-
viet movement of political, moral
and cultural dissent has been al-
lowed a form of contained exist-
ence, apparently upon order of
high-level Communist or K.G.B.
officials.

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a special holiday supplem

Inside: Southern U: Anatomy of a trage
local poets and more-see contents, pag

;.w. h r. ,Y" iF, .r n

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