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December 09, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-09

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Page Eighf'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, December 9, 1972

!'Page EigTT THE MICHIGAN DAILY. - _

SaturdayI December 9 , ..... 1972 .

A

A 11 51 if I"IL/ 1NL.'INA L'L' .y I

wu juira uiadireeu:dr
New trial- ordered for

Ellsberg

'Life' magazine ceases
publication on Dec. 29

By AP and UPI
LOS ANGELES-U.S. District
Court Judge Matt Byrne said yes-
terday he intendedtodeclare a
mistrial in the Pentagon Papers
case against Daniel Ellsberg and
dismiss the jury already selected
in the case and pick a new one.
Byrne's action came after the
9th Circuit Court of Appeal in San
Francisco handed down an opinion
saying, "It appears to us as fool-
ish to proceed to trial in the case
with the jury selected four months
ago.,"

Byrne, who ruled last week that
the jurors could still -be fair and
impartial, said he still believes that
tis so..
"However, in view of the lan-
guage in the order of the Court of
Appeals.. . . I believe the Court
of Appeals is advising that there is
a substantial danger that a case
tried by this jury ,might be dis-
turbed on appeal . .
The court's action meant that
both,'sides will have to-- go. back to
the start i a trial which began
with jury selection last July, al-
though none of its members heard
a single' word of testimony about
the alleged theft of the secret gov-
ernment documents because of a
series of appeals.
Attorneys for Ellsberg and his
codefendant, Anthony Russo, assur-
ed the court that they were making
an unconditional offer of waiving,
any appeal on grounds of double
jeopardy should the court ' grant
their motion for a mistrial and'dis-
missal of the jury..
"The language of the appeals
court opinion puts into gravest
doubt, before the trial actually
starts, a proceeding which will cost
the taxpayers at least a million
dollars," said H, Peter Young,-
Russo's attorney. "We think the
opinion foreshadows an ultimate
appellate opinion holding of re-
versible error in the event of a
conviction."
Russo was in the courtroom and

he was jubilant at the court's withdrawn its motion for a mis-
action. trial and thus put itself in a posi-
"This is definitely a big victory'tion where, an appellate court had
for us--as a matter of fact, the implied, conviction would almost
first victory in the whole case," certainly be reversed.
Russo told newspapermen. "It will "That's the sort of thing theE
"put us in a much better position government might do," he said.
with a new jury." "It isn't the sort of thing we're
Russo said the defense could have going to do."

(Continued from Page 1)
win its battle against censorship
and prudery.
"Life" was the second large
photo-journalism magazine to pass
from the scene this decade.
"LTook," its chief competitor, suc-
cumbed in 1970.
"Life's" form of photo-journal-
ism and the magazine's appeal as

Burns guards face ight
over controversial pay hike

an advertising medium encounter-
ed severe competition from tele-
vision sincetthe late 1950s. Itstdeath
also was attributed in part to ris-
ing postal rates.
In the past two years, "Life"
changed its circulation strategy,
reducing its total circulation in
two steps from 8.5 million to its
present 5.5 million. At its death its
price per issue was 50 cents com-
pared to 10 cents at its founding.
In June 1936, Luce described the
new magazine, as yet unnamed, in
a glowing prospectus: "To see
life;, to see the world; to eyewit-
ness great events; to watch the
faces of the poor and the gestures
of the proud; to see strange things
. to see and to take pleasure
in seeing; to see and be amazed;
to see and be instructed."
Time Inc. stock jumped 6
points with the announcement of
"Life's" demise.

The 3rd meeting of the CENTER FOR AFRO-
AMERICAN & AFRICAN STUDIES' Fall 1972
Colloquium on Africa will be conducted by:
Professor Harold G. Lawrence
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY-OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
Professor Lawrence's Colloquium address will focus on:
THE PRESENCE OF AFRICANS IN THE
NEW WORLD BEFORE COLUMBUS
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
Tuesday, December 12, 1972
2402 MASON HALL-7 TO 9 P.M.

Teagardeni and VanWinkle
in concert at
BIMBO'S in Ypsilanti
TUESDAY, DEC. 12
9:00 P.M.

(Continued from Page 1)
However, Pastula's office report-
edly told Work the reason he did
not give the guards the raise was
that Burns could not get the addi-
tional money from the University
that it would need to do so.
Several guards, who asked that
their names be withheld, said the
only strategy they thought might
get them the raise would be a pub-
licity campaign.
"The University is the only
group that, can put pressure on
Burns now," one said. The agency
is scared of losing the contract be-
cause they barely got it this year.
Maybe if we make a big enough
stink about it they'll be scared
enough of losing the contract next
year to do something."

"We're the highest paying guard
agency in the state," Pastula said
yesterday. "We give all the guards
throughout the state the same
training, the same professional
guidance, so if we find that one
group is getting paid more than
necessary, we cut it back. There's
no reason to pay more than we
have to, otherwise we might as
well not be in business."

among guards here has tradition-
ally been difficult. Unlike guards
at many other plants, who tend to
be retired men looking for employ-
ment to supplement social security
payments, University guards are
mostly students. Few stay on the
job for even the 90 days required
for definition as a full-time em-
ployee.
Inconvenient hours and le'ss than

mmmmmmli

'A"

_.

V ,

Ellsberg

The selling of Santa

(Continued from Page 1)
"so far this season I have had
everybody including business ex-
ecutives sitting on my lap." He
starts out towards his little red
shingled Santa House situated in
the middle of the Arborland mall.
All eyes turn his way.
"Merry Christmas Santa.. ."
"Can you get me anything I
want ..."
"Look at his stomach."
He heads for his house and adds
through a mouthful of white beard,
"Everybody 1 o v e s Santa Claus
whether they believe in him or
not . . . maybe it makes them
remember how much fun it was
just to believe in some jolly old
man in a red suit?"
Santa Claus takes his place in
his house. A line of adults clinging
to their children immediately forms
outside.
* * *
"With so many other problems,
what the hell difference does it
make what they tell them about
Santa Claus," said psychology Prof.
Elton McNeil in response to the
question "What should parents tell
their children about Santa Claus?"
* * *

Her mittens were pinned to her
coat arms and a heavy woolen
hat covered her head. It was easy
to see that she gladly would ex-
change her right arm for that toy.
A passerby noticed the scene
and decided to talk with the young
girl whose age could not exceed
eight years.
"Maybe Santa Claus will get you
that toy for Christmas," the pass-
erby dribbled in some terribly
condescending manner.
"Bullshit," Janet's eyes moved
off the toy for a split second; time
enough to make the passerby run
off in dismay.
* * *
Scott was the sole occupant of
a small playground on South Uni-
versity across the street from An-
gell School. It was freezing cold
but he played undisturbed on the
swings. He seemed more concern-
ed with the swing than with the
stranger who was grilling him
with questions about toys, school
etc. Yet he came to life when the
subject turned to Santa Claus. "My
mother told me that Santa Claus
did not exist . . . but I still like
the presents he gives me."
* * *
A matchbox train set cruised
through the window display in a
local Ann Arbor jewelry store. A

woman stopped along with her two
children to take a look. While she
lifted one child up for a peek the
other strained on his toes and
peered into the window. A student
laden with books stopped for a
look and seemed equally fascinated
as the two children. He innocently
questioned the young boy, "Do you
believe in Santa Claus?"
The child looked perplexed but
the mother shot the student a "how
dare you" stare and insisted,
"There has never been any doubt,'
has there?"
The student sought cover in a
passing crowd and realized that
Santa Claus is just one of those
things you never talk about.
Santa Claus takes his place in
his red shack on the Arborland
mall. After carefully placing him-
self in a large comfortable chair,
he is ready to take his first visitor
of the day. A little girl rushes up
and mounts his rotund stomach.
After asking Santa for some sort
of doll she is given a red balloon
and a candy cane. She gives Santa
a kiss and says, "I love you
Santa."
He smiles the smile of a very
happy man.

-wavaInconv ien huars Uand 1Ve's11tU1
Pastula called the present Ann optimum working conditions are
Arbor pay of $2.51 per hour "a cited to explain the short term of
very respectable wage for the job most local Burns guards. The
they're doing." large majority of campus guards
Guards say they feel that since work the midnight shift.
they are doing the same work as The rapid turnover is explained
before and their contract held by some guards as conscious poli-
them due for a raise, they should cy on the part of the company.
have received 12 cents more per "The guy who works more than 90
hour like other union members. days is a veteran," one guard said.
A n o th e r recent controversy "In terms of Burns having con-
arose over a document guards trol of us and telling us what to
were asked to sign that gave the do, this means they can change the
district manager in Detroit the rules and the guards will grum-
right to assess the damages em- ble, but they know in a few
ployes would have to pay if they months no one will be there who
were involved in an accident while even remembers that there's been
driving a Burns vehicle. A guard a change."
involved said considerable "im-
plied pressure" was put on him
and two others to sign, and that
supervisors suggested they would
take the men off desirable posts
if they did not comply. EASY I
According to Frederick Davids,
University director of safety, the On Campus Probal
Burns guards have two roles. The
presence of guards on campus ENACT Is Working
lowers University fire and dam-
age insurance rates by thousands If You Are a Bicyci
of dollars. Also, guards are ex-
pected to act as "an extension of b An
the eyes and ears of the police," HELP OUTb A
Davids said, although they are BicycleQuestionn
there mostly to report crime rath-
er than to stop it. At Winter TermnR
Organizing for group action A

HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE IT!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1973
TRIMS-SHAGS
ond RAZOR CUTS
2 SHOPS
! 61 1 E. University
0 615 E. Liberty
Bascola Barbers
IIDERS?

soft

EBONY PLAYERS
(BLACK MARKLEY COUNCIL)
in Cooperation with
PRESENT
Ted Shine's CONTRIBUTION
AND
Douglas Ward's HAPPY ENDING

PRE-CHRISTMAS
GIFT BOOK SALE
Includes Publisher's Remainders, Reprints,
Close Outs and Special Imports
e SAN.-O Sty ArnE
State Street at N. U.-Opn-Saturday Afternons

p

bly

Not

on This Problem.
e Rider,
vering the
ire
egistration.

*December 9
2 P.M. and 8 P.M.
*December 18
2 P.M. and 8 P.M.

Arena Theater
(Frieze Building)
$t.75 for matinees
$2.00 for evening performances

Minh. Union:
BILLIARDS
Open 1 a.Bm.
P OOL TABLE

7 t 3' .'.'".,.

Tickets are on sale on the first floor of the Michigan Union
beginning Wed., Nov. 29 thru Fri., Dec. 8 from 12 P.M.-4 P.M.
"'Due to the nature of the theater, late comers may be delayed
in being seated 10-20 minutes.

ENACT
764-4410

i

Janet
Barbie
gomery

stood drooling over the
Camper ($9.77) in Mont-
Ward's toy department.

a

THE NEW
AP ALMANAC...,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 Knack," Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
DAY CALENDAR 3200 SAB
Mathematics - Mini - Michi - Topo- ATTENTION SENIORS: Opportunity
logy - Conf.: M. Fuchs, MSU, "An Ap- for Seniors to interview employers
plipation of Segal's Classifying Space during Christmas vacation at Com-
Construction," 10:30 am.; D. Wigner, munity Career Conferences in: Canton,
"Completeness of Quotient Groups," 0., Dec. 27-28; Cleveland, O., Dec. 27-
11:45 am.; C. Simon, "On Classifying 29; Elyria, O., Dec. 27 Toledo, 0., Dec.
Diffeomorphisms," 2 pm.; C. L. See- 27-28; Evanston, Ind., Dec. 27-28; Phil-
beck, MSU, "Locally Homotopically Un- adelphia, Pa., Dec. 27-29; Harrisburg,
knotted Imbeddings," 3:45 pm.; D. Pa., Dec. 27; New Haven, Conn., Dec.
Stevens, "Which Groups Can be Fun- 28. Brochures & additional into avail-
damental Groups of Three-Manifolds?" able in this office.
4:30 pm., 3201 Angell Hall. STUDENT PERSONNEL ASSISTANT-
Pathology - Carl V. Weller Memor- SHIPS: The Ohio State University &
ial Lecture: L. V. Ackerman, Wash. The Univ. of Vermont offer assistant-
Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, Mo., ships for work as residence hall advis-
"Common Errors in the Diagnosis of ors or in student personnel work while
Bone Tumors," Rackham Amph., 1:15; pursuing a graduate degree. Brochures
pm. posted in Career Planning & Placement
UAC-Ebony Players: Two plays, "Con- Office.
tribution," "Happy Ending," Frieze
Arena, 2, 8 pm. SUMMER PLACEMENT
School of Music: D. Sosin, honors 212 SAB 763-4117
lecture, piano and film, SM Recital H & S Pogue Company, Cincinnati,
Hall, 2:30 pm. Ohio. College Summer BoardOpenings.
Dance Dept.: "Homemade Dance," Undergraduate students interested in
"Rag for a Compass & Rule," Barbour fashion and merchandising. Personal
Gym, 7, 9 pm. interviews held Dec. 18-23. Further de-
Rive Gauche: B. Beckerman, coun- tails available at this office.
try & mountain music, 1024 Hill St., National Aeronautics and Space Ad-
8 pm. ministration, Houston. Summer Pro-
School of Music: E. Hathaway, harp, gram for graduate students with bach-
SM Recital Hall, 8 pm. elor's degree in following fields - en-
UAC-Daystar: Allman Bros., Dr. John, gineering, physical sciences, public
Rockets Concert, Crisler, 8 pm. admin., bus.,ad., related fields. Further
University Players: Jellicoe's "The details and applies. available.

1~~"~~~

V

I

Room and Board
in Com0-p s
on North Campus
and Central Campus
Places for Men and Women
Winter term 1973

IF YOU REALLY MUST KNOW
... The Official ASSOCIATED PRESS ALMANAC will
tell you. More than 900 pages of reference material, rang-
ing from the latest election returns to records and statis-
tics of all major sports. It's a reference guide that belongs
in every home, office and school. And it's available through
this newspaper for only $1.50 plus a postage and handling
charge of 25 cents. Order your copy today.
- AP ALMANAC '
i The Michigan Daily (Ann Arbor, Mich.)
n ^ n . --,_

Let's
Clear

Some people complain about Consumers Power Company, and some com-
plaints are justified. They always are. Others are based on simple mis-
understanding. In either case they need to be talked about. Consumers has
asked me to do this. So, in the next few months, I'll try to clear the air
about some problems that affect all of us. The growing energy 'shortage.
The need for new power plants. The reason for higher rates. Conservation.

P.B. BoxN Jry7
Teaneck, New Jersey 07666

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