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December 06, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-06

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Page Two

h

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, December 6, 1972

HALF-MILLION TO WATCH

Last Apollo mission set

to

ihft-off

CAPE KENNEDY (MP) - Apol-
lo 17, perhap's man's last visit
to the moon for decades, is ready
to blast off tonight on Amer-.
ica's = most spectacular manned
space launching.
The smoothest countdown in
Apollo history ticked flawlessly
toward a 9:53 p.m. EST liftoff in
the first afterdark launching of
a U.S. manned flight, a fiery

event expected to draw half a
million visitors to the Cape Ken-
nedy area.
Astronauts Eugene Cernan,
geologist Harrison Schmitt and
Ronald Evans have completed 16
months of training for the final
and most ambitious of the Apol-
los.
For the last Apollo, NASA has
selected a scientifically intrigu-

Nation's prosecutors
want death penalty
CORONADO, Calif. UP) - Nearly "I think it's very likely that the
all of the nation's state attorneys death penalty will be restored on a
general want the death penalty to state-by-state basis within 1 to
at least be available, says the two years," Atty. Gen. Gary Nel-
chairman of a committee drafting son said in an interview.
proposals to reinstate capital pun- Derryberry said eight or 10
ishment. states now prohibit all capital pun-
Proposed laws to reimpose capi- ishment, but "we think even those
tal punishmentiare being prepared states would favor the availability
for consideration at the winter }of it."

ing site named Taurus-Littrow as
the landing site for Cernan and
Schmitt.
They are to guide the spindley
legged Challenger to a touch-
down in a three-mile long vol-
canic valley which Cernan terms
"box canyon" because it is ring-
ed by mountains rising up to
7,000 feet.
With zero hour approaching,
the pace quickened at the launch
pad as crews worked to prepare
'the Saturn S rocket, the com-
mand ship America a n d t h e
lunar ship Challenger.
Flight batteries were activated,
fuel cells serviced, tanks pres-
surized, and food and equipment
stowed aboard the spaceships.
Five tiny mice, packed in a seal-
ed container, were put aboard in
an experiment to determine the
affects of cosmic rays on brain
tissue.
The rodents - five tiny mice
who'll give their lives for sci-
ence s came aboard in individual
tubes inside a sealed alumnum
canister. They'll ride in the com-
mand ship America with Evans
around the moon.
Experimenters implanted waf-
er-like cosmic ray detectors tin-
der the skulls of the mice. Back
on earth, the tiny natives of the
California desert will be killed
and their pea-sized brains exam-
ined to determine how cosmic ra-
diation has affected brain tissue.
That experiment looks to the

tonight
five-county area will work
through their days off and extra
shifts to handle the crowds jam-
ming U.S. Highway 1 and other
major roadways.
Floodlights attached to port-
able generators will illuminate
dark intersections in key areas
around Cocoa Beach which will
also be manned by traffic cops
decked out in flourescent orange
clothing.
Civil Defense, Red Cross, Sal-
vation Army, civilian volunteers
and various police and fire agen-
cies have combined to draw up
a master plan for people control.
The distinguished visitor list
has been growing daily and in-
cludes such people as Charlie
Smith, the 130-year-old f o r in e r
slave who claims to be the coun-
try's oldest citizen and s t i l l
doubts man can walk on the
moon, and Vice President Spiro
Agnew, a personal friend of Cer-
nan s.

AA CIVIC THEATRE
AUDITIONS
FOR
"THIEVE'S CARNIVAL"
DEC. 5, 6, 7
7:30 P.M.
AACT BLDG.-
201 West Mulholland
(off W. Washington)
ROLES: 5 women, 9 men
Join The Daily Staff
DIAL 668-6416
Ma afl
e D4H .┬░Lawr 'rce's
Virgill C& the Cbsy0
THURSDAY
"DARLING" & "GRADUATE"

ART

I

CINEMA

482-3300

t

31 N. Washington

Parking

BOX OFFICE OPENS TOMORROW! 12:30-5:00 P.M.

PL
prou

THE
AYERS
dly presents

"MONA MONA"
"HISTORY OF THE
BLUE MOVIE "
EXCLUSIVE-ONE WEEK ONLY

Cernan

future ,when humans hope to
make extended space flights, but
another lunar landing by Amer-
icans is not in plans for the rest
of the century except perhaps as
a joint Russian-American ven-
ture.
Police are bracing for the last-
minute assault of moon-shot wat-
chers who are arriving in camp-
ers, cars and yachts to view tne
Apollo 17 launch.
Hundreds of police throughout a

DEC. 6 thru DEC. 9-
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
"An original and demented romp, with wild humor and inescapable
laughter." New York Times

meeting of the National Associa-
tion of Attorneys General here.
Oklahoma Atty. Gen. L a r r y
Derryberry, chairman of an 11-
member volunteer group which
worked out suggested laws, said:
"I think we will find that perhaps
all of them, plus our friends from
the Virgin Islands and Guam, re-
commend that the death penalty be
an available punishment for the
states that decide to have it."
A few attorneys general, includ-
ing those from Idaho and Alaska,
oppose reinstating the death penal-
ty.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mal
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

I

Ticket Information
Individual Tickets: $3 and $2

Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office open 12:30-5:00 p.m.
(until 8:00 on
performance days)
Box Office phone: 668-6300

---'--"

4
t
,!

1

'- k
l

U

"'LADY SINGS
THE BLUES'
A RED HOT
SMASH!"
-Gene Shoot, NBC-TV
aime rnech nPAA C O CLOP

2nd SMASH
HIT WEEK!
DY
SINGS
THE
BLUES
APA /OUNT PCTU

i

DIAL: 5-6290
THE ULTIMATE EXPERECE
FOR EVERYONE!
"DISNEY'S GREATPIONEERJNG VEN)7JRE IS
THE SEASON'S HIT RE VIVAL "Nm e
"AN INCREDIBLY REVOLUTIONARY FILM...
THE MIND CAN RUN RIOT!" The NU Tckw.
"FAR HEAD OF ITS TIME... BEST AUDIO-VISUAL.
EXPERIENCE IN TOWN!" Wiliam Wolf, cue
"BEST FAMILY FILM!" Jmph Gu~m. New.sday
"A TOTAL EXPERIENCE IN SIGHT, SOUND
AND COLOR ... MAKE FANTASIA A MUST!"
SHOWS AT
-3-57-

WORLD PREMIER
In July of 1969 John Sinclair was sentenced to 91/2-10
years in prison for possession of two joints of marijuana.
Two-and-a-half years later, on December 10, 1971, after
innumerable attempts to gain John's freedom through the
courts had met with failure, the Rainbow People's Party
organized a massive Freedom Rally for John Sinclair at
Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Fifteen thousand
people came to Crisler that night to join with a star-studded
cast of dozens of musicians and political organizers to
protest this enormous injustice. Three days later John Sin-
clair was released from prison. "TEN FOR TWO" is a record
of that historic event, featuring the performers who made
it all possible.
SUNDAY, December 10
4 SHOWS-1 DAY ONLY
FIFr-TH FORUM
5th at Liberty
Ann Arbor
Continuous from 5 p m. Adm. $2.50
Benefit for Rainbow People s Party and Rainbow Multi-Media
Advance tickets at Salvation NOW! Call 761 -9706 for informationJ

_____ ____ ____ ____WED. IS BARGAIN DAY!
231 south state, Adults 75c-1-5 P.M. Wed.!!
BOX OFFICE OPEN 12:45 P.M.
SHOW TIMES AT
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45 P.M.
Theatre Phone 662-4; 4
WHO IS THE MECHANIC?
TONIGHT!
the Arts Chorale's
I-CHRISTMAS
5 CONCERT
conducted by
MAYNARD KLEIN
MARILYN MASON-Organ
JROF. RALPH HERBERT-Cantor
Distler Bruckner
BLOCH'S SACRED SERVICE
CHRISTMAS CAROLS

Dept. of Speech Communication and Theatre

THIS COMING FRIDAY NIGHT!
"Ian Brothers Band
IN CONCERT-SAT., DEC. 9
also DR. JOHN and ROCKETS
7 ~.12-CRISLER
FEA TURING VIDEO PROJECTION OF THE CONCER T
ON A HUGE SCRE EN
$4.00 GEN. ADM. NOW MICH. UNION 11-5:30 DAILY, SAT. 12-4 P.M.
DON'T WAIT . . . TICKETS GOING SO FAST IT MAY SELLOUT EARLY
A UAC-DAYSTAR CONCERT (sorry, no personal checks)

I

HELD OVER! LAST DAY! An encyclopedia of filmmaking technique!
Glenda Jackson (Academy Award: Best Actress), Oliver Reed, & Alan Bates
in Ken Russell's
WOMEN In LOVE

THE MOVIE industry has a ten-
Tdency to take a beautiful piece
of literature and destroy its inti-
macy by splashing it across the
s c r e e n. Occasionally a miracle
occurs and a conscientious direc-
tor is able to admirably translate
an author's work. Such is the case
of Women in Love, the movie ver-
sion of D. H. Lawrence's sensual
novel directed by Ken Russell.
Lawrence is a most gifted writer
with a style that typifies great
literature . . .
It is a frightful task for a di-
rector to even attempt to present
some semblance of such a com-
plex writer, but Russell has an-

swered the call and performed
magnificently. He displays a sen-
sitive understanding of the strong
personal relationships which are
at the center of Lawrence's writ-
ing and unveils the elegance of
his colorful prose. with the aid
of script writer Larry Kramer,
Russell exposes the intensity and
passion of Lawrence's novel . . .
The casting is excellent. Oliver
Reed (Gerald) and Jenny Linden
(Ursula), even though she re-
sembles Debbie Reynolds, are good.
Alan Bates, as Birkin, Lawrence's
alter-ego in the book, looks like
a well-fed Lawrence. But, the best
performance is by Glenda Jackson

(Gudrun) who is superb as the
character who represents Law-
rence's anti-feminist view . . .
If you can accept this film for
how well it handles what it does
in the allotted time, and not con-
demn it for what it misses it is a
truly great film; and as good a
rendition of a novel as can be ex-
pected. Granted it could never be
as good as the original work, but
it is a marvelous film, well worth
seeing, and hopefully it will in-
spire you to read the book, if you
already haven't.
-Donald Kubit, The Mich. Daily
(Reprinted by permission of
the author)

TONIGHT!-Dec. 6th-LAST DAY !

35mm Color

7 & 9:30 p.m.

TOMORROW EVENING-Francois Truffaut's JULES AND JIM
COMING TUESDAY-Animated Beatles in THE YELLOW SUBMARINE
NEXT WEDNESDAY-Elliot Gould & Donald Sutherland in M*A*S*H
ALL SHOWINGS IN AUDITORIUM "A," ANGELL HALL-$1
Tickets for all of each evening's performances on sale outside the auditorium at 6 p.m.
1

I

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F is n,

AFTER A GREAT SUMMER '72
STUDENTS ABROAD

I

Proudly Announces

1973 Summer Study Programs

Their
From $710
ALL INCLUDED)

PARIS: FRENCH LANGUAGE AND
* CIVILIZATION-SORBONNE. Special
Cooking, Theatre, Art, Photography Classes

J

SPAIN: SPANISH LANGUAGE AND
CIVI LIZATION-SALAMANCA
IALY: ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND
CIVILIZATION-PERUGIA. PIETRO
VANNUCCI ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS
-PERGUIA. Drawing, Painting, Sculpture,

101.;

.

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