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December 03, 1972 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-03

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MM"

Sunday, December 3, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Job

o portuni ties

for

grad, uwmates

in

the

'70's

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following projection of job opportunities in
the 70's is provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

ElectricaT Engineers
Industrial engineers

Occupation

Estimated
employ-
ment
1970

Average
annual
openings
to 198O*

Employment prospects *

235,000 12,200 Very rapid growth related to demand3
for electrical equipment to automate
and mechanize production processes
especially for items such as computers
and numerical controls for machine
tools, and for electrical and electronic
consumer goods.
125,000 9,000 Very rapid growth in employment re-
sulting from the increasing complexityj
of industrial operations, expansion ofI
automated processes, and continued
growth of industries,
220000 10,100 Rapid employment growth due to de-
mand for industrial machinery and
machine tools and increasing techno-
logical complexity of industrial mach-
inery and processes.

PROFESSIONAL AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND RELATED PROFESSIONS

Col
Uni
See(
Tea
W R
New

lege and
iversity Teachers

ondary School
chers

335,000 10.800 Good employment prospects at 4-year
colleges for those who have Ph.D. de-
grees and at 2-year colleges for those
who have master's degrees. New Ph.D.'s
will face stronger competition for op-
enings as their numbers grow each year
1,015,000 38,000 Opportunities will be very favorable in
some geographic areas and in subject
fields such as the physical dclences.
Increased demand for teachers trained
in the education of mentally retarded
or physically handicapped children is
expected. Nevertheless, if past trends
of entry and re-entry continue, the
supply of secondary teachers will sig-
nificantly exceed requirements.

Accountants
Advertising Workers
Marketing research
workers
Personnel workers
Public 4elations
workers
CLERGYMEN
Protestant ministers
Rabbis

491,000 31,200 Excellent opportunities. Strong demand
for college trained applicants. Gradu-
ates of business and other schools of-
fering accounting should have good
prospects.

Mechanical Engineers

141,000

8,400 Slow growth. Opportunities will be
good, however, for highly qualified ap-
plicants, especially in advertising agen-
cies.

Metallurgical engineers 10,000 500
i
Mining engineers 5,000 100

ITING OCCUPATIONS
wspaper Reporters 39,0(

Rapid increase in number of workers
needed by the metalworking industries
to develop metals and new alloys as
well as adapt current ones to new
needs. and to solve metallurgical prob-
lems in the efficient use, of nuclear en-
ergy.
Favorable opportunities through the

i

00 1,650 Favorable opportunities for young peo-
ple with exceptional talent and ability
to handle news about highly special-
ized and technical subjects. Weekly or
daily newspapers in small towns and
suburban areas offer the most oppor-
tunities for beginners.

23,000 2,600 Excellent opportunities, especially for
those who have graduate degrees. Exist-
ing marketing research organizations
are expected to expand and new re-
search departments and independent
firms set up.
160,000 9,100 Favorable outlook, especially for college
graduates with training in personnel
adrinistration. More workers will be
needed for recruiting, interviewing and
psychological testing.

1970's. The number of new graduates in
mining engineering entering the indus-
try may be fewer than the number
needed to replace those who retire or
die,

Technical Writers

20,000 1,000 Good prospects for those having col-
lege courses in writing and technical
subjects plus writing ability.

OTHER PROFESSIONAL AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS

HEALTH SERVICE OCCUPATIONS

Airline Dispatchers

78,000

4,400 Rapid increase due to population
growth and rise in level of business ac-
tivity. An increasing amount of funds
will be allocated to public relations
work.

Chiropractors
Dentists
Diatherms

295,000 9,700 Competition keen in some denomina-
tions. Many clergymen will find work
in social wark, education, and as chap-
lains with the Armed Forces.
6,500 300 Number of rabbis probably will be in-
'rdequate. Growth in Jewish religious
affiliation and in the number of syna-
gogues, along with demand for rabbis
to work with social welfare and other
Jewish affiliated organizations, should
continue.

Hospital adiinistrator

Roman Catholic priests 60.000
CONSERVATION OCCUPATIONS
Foresters 22.000

2,200 Growing number needed. Number ofj
p iests ordained insufficient to meet
the needs of nkwly established parishes,
expanding colleges, and growth of the
Catholic population.
1,000 Number of forestry graduates mayx
more than meet demand. Private own-,l
ers of timberland and forest products
industries should employ increasing
numbers of foresters. Demand in the
Federal Government is expected to re-
main stable.
60 Declining employment opportunities in
the Federal Government because scien-
tific and technical duties will be done
increasingly by natural scientists. The
decline will be somewhat offset by in-
creasing employment opportunities in
the private sector.

16,000 900 Favorable outlook although only a
small growth in demand is expected.
Anticipated number of new graduates
will be inadequate to fill openings.
103,000 5,400 Very good opportunities. Limited ca-
pacity of dental schools will restrict
supply of new graduates.
30,000 2,300 Very good opportunities for both full-
Mime and part-timne workers due to)
expanding programs in hospitals and
nursing facilities and in other institu-
tions.
s 17,000 1,000 Very good opportunities for those who
nave master's degrees in hospital ad-
ministration. Applicants without grad-
uate training will find it increasingly f
difficult to enter this field.
110.000 13,500 Excellent opportunities for new gradu-
ates with bachelor's degrees in medicalj
technology. Demand will be particu-
la*'ly strong for those who have gradu-
ate training in biochemistry, microbi-
ology, immunology and virology.
13,000 1,500 Excellent opportunities for graduatesj
of approved medical record librarian
programs.
s 7,500 1,150 Excellent opportunities. Demand is ex-
pected to exceed supply as interest in
the rehabilitation of disabled persons
and the success of established occupa-
tional therapy programs increases.
18,000 800 Favorable outlook. By the mid 1970's,.
new graduates may approximate de-!
mand because of expected expansion
of optometry schools.

Architects

Medical Laboratory
Workers
Medical Record
Librarians -
Occupational therapist
Optometrists
Osteopathic Physicians

1,200 60 Few openings because field is very
small.
33,000 2,700 Favorable opportunities for registered
architects. Growth in non-residential
as well as residential construction.
Homeowners' growing awareness of the
value of architects' services also will
spur demand.

NATURAL SCIENCE OCCUPATIONS
Geologists 23,000 300

Range Managers

3,600

Favorable prospects for graduates with
advanced degrees; those who have ba-
chelor's degrees probably will face com-
petition for entry positions.

College Career Plan- 2,800 200 Very rapid increase in employment as
ning and Placement students and colleges increase in num-
Ccunselors ber and as greater recognition is given
to the need for- counseling-especially
of minority group students and stu-
dents of low income families.
Home Economists 105,000 6,700 Favorable prospects. Greatest demand
for teachers, but business also should
increase demand for those workers es-
pecially in research and development.
Industrial Designers 10,000 300 Favorable opportunities for talented
college graduates. Those with training
in industrial design may face competi-
tion from architectural and engineer-
ing graduates who have artistic talent.
Lawyers 280,000 14,000 Good prospects in salaried positions
with well-known Law firms and as
law clerks to judges for graduates of
outstanding law schools, or for those
who rank high in their classes. Growth
in demand will stem from business ex-
pansion and the increased use of legal
services by low and middle income
groups.
Librarians 125,000 11,500 Good opportunities, especially in school
libraries for those who have advanced
degrees.
Psychologists 40,000 3,700 Excellent opportunities for those who
have a doctorate; less favorable for
those with only a master's degree.
Strong demand in mental hospitals,
correctional institutions, mental hy-
giene Iclinics and community health
centers.
Social Workers 170,000 18,000 Very good prospects for those who have
training in city and bachelor's degrees
in social work. Many part-time jobs for
qualified women with experience,
Systems Analysts 100,000 22,700 Excellent opportunities due to rapid
expansion of electronic data processing
systems in business and government.
Underwriters 55,000 2,740 Favorable opportunities especially in
metropolitan areas.
Urban Planners 88,000 750 Very good prospects for those who have
training in city and regional planning.
,Construction of new cities and towns,
urban renewal projects, and beautifica-
tion and open land improvement pro-
jects will spur demand for these work-
ers.

Geophysicists

13,500

COUNSELING OCCUPATIONS,
Employment counselors 8,000

950 Excellent opportunities. Greatest de-
mand in states where osteopathy is
widely accepted as a method of treat-
ment.

1,100 Excellent opportunities for those who j
have master's degrees. or experience in V
the field. Graduates with bachelor's Podiatrists
degrees and 15 hours of counseling-re-
lated courses will find favorable op-;
portunities in state and local employ-
ment.

Rehabilitation
counselors

13,000 1,600

Shortage occpation. Excellent oppor-
tunities for those who have graduate
work in rehabilitation counseling or in
related fields.

Pharmacists

School counzSlOS ,
ENWDNOUIMMG OCCUP
Aerospaos *ngineers
Agricultural engineers
Biomedical engineers
Ceramic engineers
Chemical engineers
Civil engineers

54,000
ATIONS

5,200 Very rapid employment increase, re-
flecting continued growth of counsel-
ing services and some increases due to
secondary school enrollments.

Physical T
Physicians

herapists

65,000 1,500 Long-run look favorable but employ-
ment opportunities fluctuate periodi-
cally. Currently, openings may fall
short of the number seeking employ-
m ent.
13,000 600 Rapid increase due to the growing me-
chanization of farm operations, in-
creasing emphasis on conservation of
resources, and the broadening use of
agricultural products and wastes as in-
dustrial raw materials.
3,000 120 Excellent prospect for those who have
graduate degrees. Increased research
and development expenditures will cre-
ate new jobs in areas such as prosphe-
tics, cybernetics, instrumentation sys-
tems, computer usage, and environ-
mental pollution.
10,000 300 Rapid increase in requirements due to {
growing use of ceramic raw materials,
nuclear energy programs and electron-
ics as well as in consumer and indus-
trial uses.
50,000 1,700 Moderate growth from expansion of the
chemical industry and large expendi-
tures for research and development.
Opportunities also will arise in new
areas of work such as environmental
control.
185,000 10,000 Expanding opportunities from growing
needs for housing, -industrial building
and highway transportation systems.
Urban environmental problems such as
air pollution also should require addi-
tional civil engineers.3

7,000 250 Favorable opportunities for new gradu-
ates to establish their own practices as
well as to enter salaried positions in
other podiatrist's offices, hospitals, ex-
tended care facilities, and public health
program s.
129,000 5.160 Employment will grow as a result of
new drugs, increasing nuimbers of
pharmacies, and insurance plans cov-
ering prescriptions.
15,000 1,600 Excellent prospects as demand contin-
ues to exceed supply. Increased public
recognition of the importance of r.e-
habilitation will result in expanded
programs to help the disabled.,
303,000 22,000 Shortage occupation. Excellent oppor-
tunities for employment, as limited
capacity of medical schools restricts
supply of new graduates.
25,000 1,500 Very good outlook. Supply will be re-
stricted by limited capacity of schools
of veterinary medicine.
19.900 1.100 Very favorable opportunities for col-
lege graduates. A bachelor's degree in
environmental health is preferred, al-
though a degree in one of the basic
sciences generally is accepted.
22,000 2.200 Good opportunities, especially for those
who have completed graduate study.
Increasing emphasis on the master's
degree by Federal and state govern-
mients will limit opportunities at the
bachelor's level.

Oceanolgraphers

LIFE SCIENCE OCCUPATIONS

Biochemists
Life Scientists

12,000 800 Good employment opportunity especial-
ly ,for those who have Ph.D. degrees to
conduct independent research or to
teach. The greatest growth will be in
medical research.
100.000 9,900 Rapid increase in employment through
the 1970's. However, the number of life
science graduates also is expected to
increase rapidly and result in keen
competition for the more desirable po-
sitions. Those who hold advanced de-
grees, especially Ph.D.'s, should have
less competition than those who hold
bachelor's degrees.

8.000 500 Favorable outlook, especially for those
who have graduate degrees. Geophysi-
cists will be needed to operate highly
sophisticated equipment to find con-
cealed fuel and mineral deposits; ex-
plore the outer atmosphere and space;
and solve problems related to water
shortages, flood control, and pollution
abatement.
5,400 300 Favorable outlook for those who have
advanced degrees. The importance of
the ocean in national defense as well as
a source of energy, minerals, and food
will open up new opportunities for
specialists.

MANAGERIAL OCCUPATIONS

Veterinarians
--- --- - - - - - ---
Sanitarians
Speech Pathologists
and Audiologists

Bank Officers
City Managers
Managers and
Assistanat (hotel)

174,000 11,000 Employment is expected to grow rapid-
ly as the increased use of computers
enable banks to expand their services.
2,600 200 Excellent opportunities especially for
persons with master's degrees in public
or municipal administrations.
196,000 14,400 Favorable outlook, especially for those
who have college degrees in hotel ad-
ministration.

PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS
Chemists 137,000 9,400 Favorable outlook. Chemists will con-
tinue to be needed to perform research
and development work. They also will
be needed to teach at colleges and uni-
versities, where the strongest demand
will be for those who have Ph.D. de-
grees.

Food Scientists

MATHEMATICS AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS

Actuaries
Mathematicians
Statisticians

5,200 300 Excellent opportunities. Strong demand
for recent college graduates who have
backgrounds in mathematics and have
passed actuarial ekaminations.
73,000 4,680 Favorable outlook for Ph.D. graduates
to teach and do research. Because of
the large number of mathematicians
projected to receive bachelor's degrees.
competition for entry positions will be
keen.
24,000 1,400 Very good opportunities for new gradu-
ates and experienced statisticians in
industry and government.

Physicists

7,300 400 Favorable employment outlook at all
degree levels as a result of an expand-
ing population demanding a greater
variety of quality convenience foods-
both in and outside the home.
43,000 3,500 Favorable opportunities for those who
have advanced degrees to teach at col-
leges and universities. Physicists will
1e required in substantial numbers to
do complex research and development
work,
3,100 200 Rapid increase, especially in the col-
lege teaching field. Some positions will
be found in museums, archeological
research programs, mental and public
health programs, and in community
survey work.

SERVICE OCCUPATIONS

SALES OCCUPATIONS
Manufacturers 510,000 25,000 Favorable opportunities for well-train-
Salesmen ed workers, but competition will be
keen. Best prospects for those trained
to handle technical products.
Securities Salesmen 200,000 11,800 Good- opportunities.

F.B.I. Special Agents

7,900

Employment expected to rise as FBI
responsibilities grow. Turnover rate is
traditionally low.

SOCIAL SCIENTISTS

Anthropologiits

Economiists

33,000 2300

Excellent opportunities for those who
have graduate degrees in teaching, gov-
ernment and business. Young people
with bachelor's degrees will find em-
ployment in Government and as man-
agement trainees in industry and busi-
ness.

Geographers
Historians

7,100 500 Favorable outlook. Demand will be
strong in teaching and research for
those who have PhD.'s. Those who
have master's degrees or less face com-
petition. Colleges and universities will
offer the greatest number of opportun-
ities, although employment is expected
to rise in government and in private
industry.
15,500 1,000 Favorable opportunities in teaching
and archival work for experienced Ph.-
D. New PhD. recipients and those with
lesser degrees will encounter competi-
tion, teaching positions available for
those meeting certification require-
ments.
1,100 700 Very good prospects for those who have
Ph.D. degrees and are interested in col-
lege teaching. More limited prospects
for those with master's degrees or less.
12,000 800 Good prospects for those who have Ph.-
D. degrees but those with only master's
degrees will face considerable competi-
tion. Very good opportunities in col-
lege teaching and in nonteaching fields
dealing with social and welfare prob-
lems and the implementation of legis-
Iation to develop human resources.

Political Scientists

Sociologists

yf r.',
.l

l'EACIIElt9

IN

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