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December 01, 1972 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday; December 1, 1972

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, December 1, 1972.

t.

ROTC CHIEF SPEAKS

Is automated

(Continued from Page 1)
a problem. However he claimed
that the system was a necessary
development because of constraints
against unrestricted ground war-'
fare put on the military by poli-
ticians.
Irish also said that the develop-
ment of sensors was desirable be-
cause it cut down on American
casualties in Vietnam.
Irish sat in his small steel-fur-
nitured office in North Hall. He
spoke quietly, yet insistently. He
said that he wished to clear upf
misunderstandings of the role of
the military in Vietnam and,. in

particular, the role of automated
warfare.
"The military doesn't make war,
it fights wars given to us by the
politicians," he said. "When dip-
lomatic efforts break down, the
diplomats hand the problem to us.
But at the same time they put a
set of restrictions on us."
Irish cited the restriction on
calling up the reserves as an ex-
ample of how the decisions of
civilian policy-makers necessitated
the development of automated
warfare.
"We were told that we couldn't
call up the reserves on a large

warfare
scale," he said. "But to do the job
right, we needed large numbers
of ground troops. We had a job to
do without the resources necessary
to carry it out.
"In that situation, the only thing
we could do was to look for an
alternative to committing a large
body of ground troops in Vietnam.
The answer that presented itself
was 'push-button war'."
Irish said that the practice of
restricted warfare evolved dur-
ing World War II.
"At the beginning of the war the
military had its hands free," he
said. "We were given a job and
all we had to do was win. Then
as the war progressed and Amer-
ican victory seemed more prob-
able, diplomatic restraints were
put on the army. We couldn't take
Berlin for example."
Faced with the demise of tra-
ditional no-holds barred warfare,
the military looked to modern tech-
nology for an alternative.

CHAVURAT AIYA-Israeli Students Union
b e s ?"I" (''q-''"" '"'' "'"
beth-BET C AF
The development of sensors, has-B
tened by the development of min-m
iaturized circuits, provided just meet people for an informal Israeli atmOs-
such an alternative, according to phere for song, food and discussion. This
Irish. Sensors offered a way
around t h e political sanctions week features a movie about Israel;
against an all-out ground war.
They also enabled the military to"
cut American combat deaths dras-
tically.
However, he said that the nature SAT., DEC. 2- 7 P.
of guerilla warfare made discrimi-9n
nation between Viet Cong and ci- 936 DEWEY (near Packard)
vilians difficult. for more info: 761 -3161
"They don't wear nice uni-
forms," he said. "In World War
II the enemy wore German uni-
forms. That was nice, civilized
warfare. In Vietnam you think a
man is your friend and when you
turn your back he shoots you."
Despite its drawbacks automated
warfare will prove to be the way
of the future, according to Irish.
Irish said that ROTC officers
would play an important part in
keeping automated warfare from
getting out of hand. _

DO YOU PLAY CHESS?
GO? CRIBBAGE?
You'll find boards and pieces
here, at the
INDIA ART SHOP
330 MAYNA RD-near Arcade

Time capsule buried
at new A&D school

Join The Daily
CIRCULATION DEPT.
Come in any afternoon
420 Maynard

(Continued from Page 1)
Dana Atchley, a leading prac-
ticitioner and collector of "cor-
respondence art," submitted a
map showing the itinerary of his
Ace Space Company (spACEco)
art group, which has exhibited cor-
respondence art work across the
country.'
Among other avant garde con-
tributors is New York artist Chris-
to. He submitted color slides of two
of his recent artistic exploits: the
suspension of a quarter-mile cloth
"curtain'' across a wilderness area
in Colorado and the "wrapping" of
a half-mile coastline area in Aus-
tralia with another of his curtains.
Other contributions to the time
capsule include: a package of dust,
a bicycle license, a cloth Egyptian
fold-out butterfly which can be
compressed into a cacoon, a plastic
container filled with sugar and a
marble.
More traditional contributions in-
clude drawings, photographs and
reproductions of paintings.
Wedell and O'Brien view some of
the off-beat contributions as at-
tempts to explore space and time
through the use of symbols and
they add that many of the con-
tributors made an effort to clarify
their works with written explana-
tions.

A complete
tributions is
department.

list of the art con-
on file in the art

The outside of the capsule, a
metal cylinder about nine inches in
diameter and three and a half feet
in length, was painted ; with red
swirls to distinguish it from an
ordinary piece of construction.
The actual ceremony of burying
the time capsule consisted of a few
remarks from O'Brien and Wedell.
With the time capsule in place,
Nina Tanay, one of the cheerlead-
ers, stood near the site clutching
her Raggedy Ann doll, partially
deflated yellow balloon and a pair
of champagne pink ballet slippers.
Gingerly she tossed a bouquet of
assorted fall plastic flowers upon
the lowered capsule.
The crowd of approximately 40
art students next threw handfuls
of dirt onto the capsule and the
ceremony was complete.
George Bayliss, chairman of the
University art department, said he
supported the project as a way of
documenting current movements in
the art world. Often, he noted, art
work which is not considered im-
portant during one era later turns
out to be historically significant.
According to O'Brien, art's
"whole appreciation, the way it
grows, is through time."

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Sandwiches & Side Orders Also Available

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*All trips include air transportation, hotel accommodations,
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FOR INFORMATION CALL: ADMINISTRATIVE &
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sign up for interviews 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
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For info. Call 763-3241
Applications must be submitted by 5 p.m. Dec. 4, 1972

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LOCATIONS
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"

11

BILL & SAM FIGHT TO KEEP PRICES DOWN
FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS
STADIUM RESTAURANT
AND PIZZERIA

I

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only 99 CENTS for
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