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November 30, 1972 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1972-11-30

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 30, 1'972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 30, 1972

NIXON DECISION:
Sumnmit turned down

Pontiac police suspect DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
shots foiled riot lani---.....

By the UPI and Reuters
WASHINGTON-President Nixon
yesterday sought to persuade South
Vietnam to ease its objections to a
ceasefire, but indicated he was not
prepared to hold a summit meeting
with South Vietnamese President
Nguyen Van Thieu.

Nixon planned to outline

the

City ward
plan passes
(Continued from Page 1)
ity."
The "Black Plan" was defeated
8-3, as De Grieck and Nancy
Wechsler (HRP-Second W a r d)
were joined by Thomas in their
dissenting votes.
Thomas explained that he liked
the Black Plan, because it did not
split the city's black precincts in-
to two wards as the Prior Com-
mission Plan proposed to do.
If Harris vetoes the "Green
Plan" and the move is appealed,
the suit could finally wind up in
the State Supreme Court. The time
needed for such action could de-
lay the city elections until next
summer, when students are out of
town.
Later, the council passed a reso-
lution supporting the boycott of
Farah Manufacturing Company, by
a 6-5 vote. The Farah Company,
producers of Farah slacks, has
been accused of exploiting Chicano
laborers.
The resolution condemns "the
company's interference with the
workers' efforts to establish a
union and a better way of life -
with dignity and security."
The vote on the resolution fol-
lowed party lines, with all Demo-
cratic and HRP council members
voting in favor and all Republi-
cans opposed.

ceasefire terms he wants Saigon
to accept in a WhiteHouse meet-
ing with Thieu's foreign affairs
advisor Nguyen Phu Duc.
Duc, who arrived in Washingran
Tuesday night, was reported to
have come with an urgent request
for summit talks between Nixon
and. Thieu.
He was also expected to make a
last-ditch attempt to persuade Nix-
on to insist on the withdrawal of
all North Vietnam troops from the
South as part of a ceasefire agree-
ment.
But White House spokesman Ron-
ald Ziegler said there were no
plans for a summit meeting at this
time.
In Paris, Communist sources said
Hanoi negotiator Le Duc Tho might
pack up and go home if White
House adviser Henry Kissinger re-
turns to the Paris peace talks sup-
porting Thieu's demands.
The Kissinger-Tho talks are to
resume Monday after a nine-day
break,
Communist China, for the second
time in two days, urged the United
States to sign the Vietnam cease-
fire agreement as drafted.
Hanoi Radio broadcast a state-
ment Tuesday from Chinese Pre-
mier Chou En-lai criticizing the
delay and Peking Radio broadcast
a similar official statement yester-
day from Foreign Minister Chi
Peng-fei.

By AP and UPI
PONTIAC - The black pupil ac-
cused of shooting and wounding
five sophomores in a courtyard at
Pontiac Central High School may
have stopped another group of
black pupils from starting a riot,
the school's police counselor says.
Two students, ages 15 and 16,
were arrested Tuesday on charges
of conspiracy to incite riot. They
have been released pending a hear-
ing in Oakland County Juvenile
Court at a date not yet set.
Police said yesterday they are
not sure what motives were behind,
the alleged conspiracy.I
Earlier Tuesday, a 16-year-old
black pupil surrendered. The un-
identified youth,. in jail here in
place of a $10,000 bond, is charged
with assault to commit murder in
the shooting Monday. He awaits
a hearing Dec. 13 in Juvenile Court.,
"We started investigating the
possibility of a conspiracy to riot'
because we could not think of any
other motive for the shooting,"
Capt. Ray Meggitt said.
"We have evidence to believe
they wanted a riot," he added.
"Some of our information is verbal
and some written."
Detective James Lafnear, the
school's police counselor who has
been patrolling the corridors and
working with students for seven
years, said:
"The shooting probably stopped
those who wanted a riot because

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30 Ctr. for Coord. of Ancient & Modern
DAY CALENDAR Studies and The Medical School: E. D.
they didn't want to get in that Sch. of Education 1st Annual Conf. Pellegrino, State U. of N. Y. at Stony
on Collective Negotiations ingEduca- Brook. Medicine, the Humanities &
deep. They were looking to bust a tion: A. Shanker, N. Y. Congress of the University" Rackham Amph., 4:10
few heads and get their licks in, Teachers, "Prospects, Problems, and pm.
not shoot anyone. It probably 1mpact on a Merged Teacher Organ- International Night: German food,
shocked them into quitting." ization," 9 am; A. Bum, MSU, "A Re- League cafeteria, 5 pm.
view of Significant Research in Collec- Political Science: Southern Africa
Witnesses said the shooting, which tive Negotiations in Education," 1:30 Film Show: "Afrikaner," ABC's "South
took place during a class-ch,!nge pm., 2nd floor, League. Africa;" "South African Essay," UGLI
period in the courtyard separating Architecture & Design: "Time Cap- Multipurpose Rm., 7:30 pm.
the school's two buildings, followed u deposit, new A&D bldg. site, N. University Players: Pinter's "Old
Campus. 11 am. Times," People's Ballroom, E. Washing-
a scuffle between white and black Computing Center: J. DiGiuseppe, ton, 8 pm.
pupils. "Introduction to the Use of the Data School of Music: Opera workshop,
That scuffle apparently was to Concentrator," Seminar Rm., Comp. scenes from six operas, SM Recital Hall,
serve as the start of the rio, .olc tr.,3pm. 8 pm.
seraside riot, poe Pchiatry Lecture: H. Simon, Car- School of Music: Ronald Copes, vio-
said. negie-Mellon Univ., "Human Problem lin, Aud. 4, MLB, 8 pm.
-----Solving," S. Lect. Hall, Med. Sci. II, Michigan Women in Science: 296
3:15 pm. Physics-Astron. Bldg., 8 pm.
Program in Engineering for Public Rive Gauche: International Coffee
Systems: A. Blumstein, Carnegie-Mel- hour, 1024 Hill St., 9 pm.
Ion Univ., "A Project Course as a ORGANIZATIONAL NOTES
Clinical Experience in Policy Analysis," SUMMER PLACEMENT
" 229 W. Engin., 4 pm. 212 SAB, 763-4117
jZ~l ~ j1 Llll7 LA Open Forum: On appeals pro- ' A T T E N T I 0 N: Washington
eoinprornise cedure, 2553 LSA, 4 pm. Post, Wash. D.C.: Juniors, Seniors and
Architecture & Design: Multi-media grad students - deadline for applying
(Continued from Page 1) presentation of the works of Dana for summer positions is Dec. 1. Workj
with anything relating solely to Atchley & other artists, Arch. Aud., 4 for national, state or local in sports,
pm. business desks, etc.

ARK
ENCOUNTER SERIES
"GAY LIBERATION
AND
THE CHURCH"
Jim Toy

1421 Hill St.

Thursday 7:30

SGC dope deal a dream?

(Continued from Page 1)
in the Arb."
Hornstein said that further de-
tails could be worked out by the
proposed SGC Dope Board and the
proposed vice president in charge
of dope.
Despite his optimism, Hornstein
will have a tough time of making
the co-op a reality if the proposal
passes. Such formidable opponents
as the Board of Regents and the
Ann Arbor police threaten to make
co-operative dope just another pipe
dream.
Vice President of Student Ser-
vices Henry Johnson, asked for his

reaction, chuckled and said, "It
sounds like a joke to me."
In a more serious vein, Johnson!
said that since "SGC is a creaturel
of the Regents," a freeze on the
required funding for the proposition
would quickly and effectively put
out the lights.
"It would get general attention
very fast if it passed," Johnson
added.
Deputy Police Chief Harold Ol-
son was also contacted yesterday1
to determine how the police would
react if Council tried to enact
Hornstein's proposal. His only com-
ment was a whimsical, "I guess
selling and possessing marijuana
is still illegal, isn't it?"
Ii---......

dorm residents on a short-term
basis.
Examples cited for this in-
cluded dorm government coun-
cils, food matters such as lettuce
strikes, and minor dorm reno-
vations.
Meanwhile the HPB would
concern itself with longer term
matters such as the use of Uni-
versity land, new constructions,
and the dormitory expenditures
of general fund monies.
Although nothing formal was
voted on last night at the joint
meeting, no one raised immedi-
ate doubts or objections to the
compromise.
A suggestion that members
from each committee sit in on
the other's meetings in a non-
voting capacity was supported in
an effort to insure communica-
tion between the two.
The compromise plans must
pass through several more stages
before they are finally ratified.
OSSPB members must first ap-
pear before SGC tonight to dis-
cuss the plan.
UHC must then submit it to
OSSPB for approval.
CA R LEBCH
The Soul-Singing Rabbi
WILL BE IN THE
FISHBOWL FROM
2:30 TODAY.
JOIN HIM FOR A
HANU KA H EXPER IENCE

TOYOTA

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(Continued from Page 1)
to get things rolling. We thought
these were projects that had to
get started right away."-
Steinhauer said that he did not
know how many members were on
the committee, did not interview
any of the candidates, but still
considered Bentley suitable for the
job. Steinhauer originally suggested
Bentley to the committee.
Despite these procedural ques-
tions, most observers agree that
Bentley is competent. Zumeta said
that "he tends towards student
issues, and his heart is in the
right place."
Bentley graduated last year from
the law school. He has been active
in local student movements, but
has had little legal background.
He worked in a local law firm for
only two months over the summer.
PIRGIM hired Bob Hicks as
their legal director. Hicks was a
poverty lawyer in Massachusetts,
a court clerk for the Alaska Su-
preme Court, and a leader of the
Ralph Nader study of land use in
California. He is receiving a salary
of $10,000 for his family of three.
Bentley himself has doubts about
the selection process and the job
itself. He said that when he was
contacted last spring about the job
he recommended that the position
be advertised "as a regular Uni-

versity position, and through their,
publications."
He also had doubts whether a
full-time legal advocate is the
proper way to handle the problems'
of the students.
"There is a need for a full-time
person to handle student prob-
lems," he said. "But whether or
not it is necessary to have a legal
background I don't know.
"A lot of it is based on law. But
some of the other work could be
handled by another person," he
added.
"I suggested a lawyer be taken
on a retainer basis," he continued.
"With some law firms a deal might
have been worked out."
"I suppose I might have had an
edge in the fact that people knew
me," said Bentley.
Jacobs confirmed this point. "We
wanted people involved in student
government. Someone with a feel
for it."
But Zumeta found this highly ob-
jectionable. "This is exactly the,
type of hiring practices that we've
been trying to get away from, the
hiring of friends."
According to Jacobs, Bentley's
secretary, Gutman, was hired with-'
out any advertising. "We needed
someone who could work with Tom
(Bentley). Gutman was available'
so we gave him the job."I

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Dimensions of Religious Experience

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