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November 30, 1972 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-30

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page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 30, 1972

Page Six - THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 30, 1972

I

£li r y 4 1.L .7 y
LT~f1

Armstrong grinds

for glory

1
I

BILL

SAM

iM

BILL & SAM FIGHT TO KEEP PRICES DOWN
FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS
STADIUM RESTAURANT
AND PIZZERIA,

By ROBIN WAGNER
Twenty - two years ago, Otis
Armstrong was born into the ug-
liness and hopelessness of the
Chicago ghetto. Today, thanks to
an abundance of desire and a
sport called football, Otis Arm-
strong resides atop the career
Big Ten rushing record, replac-
ing an ancient mark held by Alan
Ameche.
"The odds against my getting
anywhere in this world were
s t a g g e r i n g," Armstrong
describes. "There was poverty,
unemployment, dope and gang
wars in my neighborhood, but I
made it out through football."
And did he ever make it out.

In a 31-game, injury-free stop-
over at Purdue, Armstrong
twisted, turned, sidestepped and
dived for 3,315 yards and a 4.9
average. Along with becoming
the all-time conference rushing
leader, the Chicagoan owns sixth
place in the NCAA ground - gain-
ing records, passing such col-
legiate superstars as Mike Gar-
rett and 0. J. Simpson of South-
ern Cal and San Francisco's 01-
lie Matson.
Armstrong's affinity for break-
ing records (and picking up the
.ieces) is unending. Every rush-
ing mark at Purdue, including
single season and career carries
and rushing yards belong to the

senior. Hold on, the best is yet to
come. Not since 1945 had the
Big Ten total offense leader not
thrown a pass. But then, that's
right, along came 1972, good ol'
Otis, 1176 total offensive yards
(no passing, of course) and an-
other spanking new record.
Armstrong's greatest "moment
of glory" occurred last weekend
against Indiana, when he gal-
loped for a new school mark of
276 yards, and touchdowns of two,
71 and 53 yards.

Super Breakfast Menu
only 99 CENTS for
eggs; ham, bacon or sausage or
any omelette on our menu with
toast & coffee or tea
99 c Mon.-Fr. 9
7-11 a.m. 99

GREEK MENU
every Tues. & Thurs.
50 CENTS OFF
on
Medium and Large Pizzas
5 p.m.-2 a.m. Mon.-Thurs.

Big Ten Standings

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tos
s, room

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Purdue
Michigan State
Minnesota
Indiana
Wisconsin
Illinois
Iowa
Northwestern

FINAL STANDINGS
Big Ten
W L T PF PA
7 1 0 162 34
7 1 0 199 97
6 2 0 196 61
5 2 1 136 80
4 4 0 151 183
3 5 0 131 205
3 5 0 103 168
2 6 0 129 176
2 7 0 80 183
1 8 0 129 231

All Game

W
10
9
6
5
4
5
5
2
2
2

L
1
1
5
S
7
6
6
9
8
9

T
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0

PF
264
261
255
158
185
204
169
177
109
146

Is
PA
57
129.
135
156
297
266
209
297
208,
390

.
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4

Send any B&W, color, polaroid, or magazine photo (original returned
unharmed). Add 50c for postage & handling for each poster ordered
N. Y. residents add sales tax. Blowups from slides or negatives add $1.00.
Send check, cash or money order (no C.O.D.)s(quantity prices on request)
Superspeed Service: Shipped in one day by 1st class mail add $2.00 per poster.

PHOTO . lV- V Van Wyck Expressway,
11418

s
,l

r. 8
e Featuring
OBIOTIC
SPECIA L
:00 A.M.

Various accolades have been
bombarded upon Armstrong dur-
ing his reign in Lafayette. Indi-
ana mentor Johnny Pont briefly,
but vividly articulated, "He's the
best, period." Cal Stoll of Min-
nesota stated, "He's tremendous-
ly strong, with speed and fine
moves. Armstrong can do it all."
Boilermaker coach Bob De-
Moss, the man fortunate enough
to possess the fleet running back,
counted every one of his lucky
stars while saying, "Otis has the
ability to turn every play into a
touchdown. He is undoubtedly the
most coachable player I've ever
seen in 22 years at Purdue and
in four All-Star games."
A r m s t r o n g, oversha-
dowed in the past by such backs
as Johnny Rodgers, Greg Pruitt
and others, is finally getting his
just rewards. Earlier in the
week, the senior was named to
the All-Big Ten squad and yes-
terday was picked by the Foot-
b41 Writers of America Associa-
tion to the UPI All-America
team.
Performing on gridirons be-
Halfway Inn
Beats
the Munchies

fore thousands of people is in-
deed, a "far cry" from scaveng-
ing for food in the deserted al-
leyways of Chicago. Armstrong,
while cherishing his personal
jackpot, possesses a refreshing
notion of his position in the
world. He explains, "A lot of
black kids everywhere don't have
much, if anything, going for
them. The least I can do as a
college athlete is to give them
incentive for school. It's my duty
to do the best I can for kids."
Not many people who gain
media publicity desire it for the
constructive purpose Armstrong
does. Repeating the theme of his
past, he continued, "I hope the
publicity will help other black
kids go the right way. I'd like to
set an example so they will stay
in school and have a future."
To build up his already steel-
like legs, Armstrong enjoys rid-
ing a bicycle. When one reporter
heard of this exercise, he quip-
ped, "That's like hearing Sophia
Loren lifts weights to develop
her chest."
From Chicago to Purdue and
hopefully on to the pros, Otis
Armstrong remains a reassuring
symbol of thoughtfulness in a
sport ruled by prima-donnas, cut-
throat competition and greed.

BRADLEY TO THE BAY
Cards grab relief, infield help

Today We'
A YlA CR
DINNER
From 11

HONOLULU (IP)-The St. Louis
Cardinals picked up relief pitcher
Wayne Granger and a pair of
young infielders yesterday in
trades with Houston and Minnesota.
The trade mart continued to hum
at the baseball winter meetings
with three deals, the other involv-
ing the Chicago White Sox and,
San Francisco Giants.
The Cardinals acquired Granger,
an experienced relief pitcher, from
the Twins in exchange for out-
fielder Larry Hisle and left-handed
pitcher John Cumberland.

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
OTIS ARMSTRONG (24) eludes the grasp of tackle Dave Gallagher
in the Boilermakers 9-6 loss to Michigan. Armstrong won the Big
Ten rushing title, total offense title and was named as an All-
American.

COME TO A
JAMAICAN DINNER
AND TALK ON POLITICS IN JAMAICA TODAY

M7W{IL )FoonS JSIRWVWT
315 S SATE SZ AGA1RDOPT61-79186

In another deal, St. Louis added the end of the season. Ramirez
infielders Ray Busse and Bobby hit .231 at Little Rock of the Texas
Fenwick while giving up catcher League.
Skip Jutzke and infielder Milt Busse batted .207 with Oklahoma
Ramirez to the Astros. City of the American Association
The White Sox, seeking outfield and Fenwick hit .180 with the
help, came up with outfielder Ken Astros last year.
Henderson and pitcher Steve Stone None among the deals matched
from the Giants in exchange for the magnitude of Tuesday's big
righthand pitcher Tom Bradley. seven-player swap between Cali-
A workhorse for the White Sox, fornia and Los Angeles that re-
Bradley compiled a 15-14 record turned slugger Frank Robinson to
and 2.98 earned run average in 40 the American League and moved
starts last season. He came to highly-coveted Andy Messersmith
Chicago in a winter meeting swap to the National League.
with California two years ago and
was one of the Sox' three regular GRANGER, 28, RETURNS to the
starters along with Wilbur Wood National League where he starred
and Stan Bahnsen. for the Cincinnati Reds from 1969
through 1971. He went to Minnesota
HENDERSON, A five-year veter- last winter in a deal in which the
an and outstanding defensive out- Reds got pitcher Tom Hall.
fielder, batted .257 for the Giants, Granger had a 3.00 earned run
two points over his lifetime aver- average with a 4-6 record last
age, with 18 homers and 51 runs season.
batted in. He had a disasterous Hisle, who previously played
start but came on strong in the with Philadelphia, batted .325 for
final two months to hike his aver- Albuquerque in the Los Angeles
age to a respectable figure last Dodger organization last year. The
season. Cards picked him up at the end
Stone had a 6-8 log and 2.98 ERA, of the season.
working as both starter and re- Cumberland, 25, was 1-5 with San
liever for the Giants. Francisco and St. Louis in 1972.
The Astros hope Jutzke, No. 2 He had been. on the Cards' Little
hitter in the American Association Rock roster. The Twins, who pass-
with a .324 average at Tulsa last ed him up in the recent minor
year, can help solve their catching league draft, sent him to their
problem. The rookie batted .239 in leageaft noh
a brief trial with the Cardinals at Tacoma farm.
IN NATIONAL HOCKEY League

THURSDAY, NOV. 30-6:30

$1.00 donation

4

for reservations call:NIGHTS-665-746
Ecumencial Campus Center-921 Church

r1
4

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11

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