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November 30, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-30

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Thursday, November 30, 1972

TFtE MI N SAN DAIILY

Pace Three

Thursday, November 30, 1972 THE MLCHIGAN DA~L'~

I Avu 1 ti U

i4

THE REAL PUBLIC
ENEMY NO. A
WEED, 'RO J-. E

cl"
TH U. FRI.
TIME CHANGE:
7 & 9:30 p.m.
TOKYO STORY
Directed by Yasujiro Ozu
in 1957, this film was
released in New York lost
year & gained enthusias-
tic reviews. The topic is
the relationship between
generations in r e c e n t
Japan, the conflict be-
tween traditional & mod-
ern life patterns.
". . One of the manifest
miracles of cinema."
Penelope Gilliat

Anything Goes ...
pure delight

By ALVIN CHARLES KATZ
What do you get when you load
up a transatlantic cruise ship
with a nightclub singer and her
five showgirls, a couple of Run-
yonesque gangsters, a proper
English gentleman and his fi-
ancee, a young business execu-
tive, two chinese gamblers and
a host of others, and send it off
to sea with a preposterous plot,
gobs of old one-liners, some great
Cole Porter songs and 25 pairs
of tapshoes? In the case of Ann
Arbor Civic Theatre's production
of AnythinghGoes, three hours of
sheer delight.
Anything Goes, written by Guy
Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Howard
Lindsay, and Russel Crouse, with
music and lyrics by the inimit-
able Cole Porter, was first pro-
duced on Broadway in 1934 and
then revived off-Broadway in
1962. Civic Theatre has chosen
to present the resurrected ver-
sion, which is slightly rewritten
from the original in order to
acommodate the integration of
some popular Porter songs writ-
ten for other shows.

-Pgs---
from DWAIN ESPER,
producer of "FREAKS!"
SINISTCR
a short on dope-smoking
in Egypt in the 1930's
-- ptO-
'CPTAIN
MARVEL'
LATE SHOW 11:00 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
all seats $2.00
Ux
"f6 19"f 0

. ..A shame
have all had to
long for it."

that we
wait so

Stanley Kaufman

SAT. SUN.
DUVIVIER:
Tales of Manhattan
Architecture
Auditorium

The ridiculous plot finds a wide
array of characters including
Public Enemy No. 13, a brassy
nightclub singer, a typical Wode-
house type Englishman and a
young stockbroker with a gang-
ster's passport sailing from New
York to England. Nearly every-
one manages to fall in love with
someone, and pandemonium
reigns clear through to the happy
ending. Fortunately, the play
moves so fast that there is
never any time to consider how
silly the whole thing really is.
Civic Theatre's production is
certainly their best effort in
some time. At the heart of it are
director-choreographer Makram
Joubran's dances, the. sort of
strenuous, look - straight - ahead
hoofing that dominated musicals
in the 1930's. They are at once
funny and exciting, and always
well executed, the precision tap
dancing being some of the best
I've seen. Joubran's choreogra-
phic skills also manifest them-
selves in his refreshing, funny
staging of the show's songs.
The cast is an exceptionally
good one, with no weak links.
Bobby Chapel stole the show
with a truly first-rate comic per-
formance as Moonface, Public
Enemy No. 13. Bruce Kent and
Beth Titmuss, a pair of Uni-
versity students, both sang and
danced well in their respective
roles as the young executive and
his ingenue girlfriend, and Pro-
fesor Beverly Pooley (of the Uni-
versity Law School) was delight-
ful as the British aristocrat. I
also enjoyed Constance Avsharian
and Patti Gold in their supporting
roles as a gangster's moll and
a dumb blonde chorine.
Judy Reicker, in the female
lead as Reno Sweeney, the night-
club singer, was weak in the
acting department in Tuesday's
opening night performance, but
demonstrated beyond a doubt
that she can really sing. When
she belted out "Take me back to
Manhattan" (borrowed from Por-
ter's The New Yorkers), I could
just about close my eyes and
see Ethel Merman.
There isn't any doubt, though,
that the real star of the show is
Cole Porter. His music is catchy,
casual, and sent me out of the
theatre singing. His lyrics-some
of the best ever written-are
worldly, clever, and transformed
the art of songwriting from the
trite old "moon-June" rhyme
schemes into what it is today.

By HARRY HAMMITT
If this cross-section of records
is at all typical, music is really
getting back on its feet. None
of these albums borders on the
sensational, but almost all of
them are definitely above aver-
age.
A somewhat obscure folk-rock
band is McKendree Spring led
by Fran McKendree on acoustic
guitar and vocals. They h a v e
a new album out called Tracks
(Decca DL7-5385). The s o n g s
are all fairly typical, but pretty
good, and are about evenly bal-
anced between lighter acoustic
pieces and more intense electric
pieces. The band's main deriva-
tion from the beaten path of
folk-rock is the inclusion in the
group of an electric violinist-
violaist, Michael Dreyfuss. The
strings werk fairly well; some-

times they are extraneous, but
they fit in particularly well in
"Light Up The Skies," where
themes borrowed from Vivaldi
are integrated quite well into a
folk-rock idiom.
From England comes an acous-
tic duo named Tir na nog. Their
album, A Tear and a Smile
(Chrysalis 1006) is a collection of
songs by guitarists Sonny Con-
dell and Leo O'Kelly which a r e
fairly typical, personal folk songs
delivered in rather intense fash-
ion. I suspect that this band has
something akin to the very old

records by Tyrannosaurus Rex
before electricity and stardom
went to their heads.
Again from England comes
Steeleye Span which was orig-
inally an off-shoot of Fairport
Convention. All direct connection
with Fairport Convention is now
gone, but the band retains a good
deal of the Fairport spirit. The
band has been around several
years, but their albums have al-
ways been quite hard to get in
the U.S. This is the first of their
albums to come out in quantity
in the U.S. It's called Below the
Salt (Chrysalis 1008). The band
is more purely English folk mu-
sic than the Fairports, but with
the strong vocals of Maddy Prior
and the use of electric guitar
and bass, they often sound like
the Jefferson Airplane. As an
example of their purity they do
a version of "John Barleycorn"
which is a good deal folkier than
the one by Traffic; they also do
a pseudo-Gregorian chant with
excellent harmonies.
One of the best of contempor-
ary American folksingers is
George Gerdes, long time friend
and teacher, of Loudan Wain-
wright. Gerdes has released the
second album he has done called
Son of Obituary (United Artists
UAS-5593). It is every bit as good
as his first, but somewhat dif-
ferent. Gerdes sings, and plays
guitar and harmonica. His folk
songs are melodic, simple, a n d
have quite good lyrics. On the
second side, he also performs
some light rock 'n' roll, includ-
ing what should become a con-
temporary classic, "Intellectual
Baby," which has fine lyrics like:
Well I was watchin' Muhammad
Ali on the T.V./ And she start-
ed to put me down/ But she
thinks it's great when I medi-
tate/ on a poem by Ezra Pound.
Brinsley Schwarz is a nice
middle of the road band from
England. They are somewhat
comparable to the Byrds, but
tighter. On this new album, Ner-
vous On The Road (United Ar-
tists UAS-5647), they play some
mellow light rock. They do nice
versions of Dave Clark's "I Like
It Like That," which is much
lighter, easier and jazzier than
Dave Clark's version, and a tight
hard-driving version of "My
Home In My Hand," a song also
done.by Commander Cody.
* * *
Surprisingly enough, one of the
best new albums is by the Ven-
tures, the instrumental b a n d
that had a string of hits in the
early sixties. The new album is
called Rock And Roll Forever
(United Artists UAS-5649), and \
pays tribute to the big instru-
mental hits of the fifties. The
original members are augment-
ed here by Larry Taylor on
bass guitar, and Harvey Mandel
on guitar. Mandel is the strength
of the band as he plays in his

John Simon
distinctive devastatisg, but very
low-key style; his playing here
is the best he's done in a long
time. Mandel and the sax-play-
er do almost all the soloing, with
an ocasional keyboard solo. The
solos are good, and Mandel's
playing is brilliant. The band does
such oldies as "Honky Tonk,"
"Rumble," "Sleepwalk," and
"You Can't Sit Down" to perfec-
tion. "You Can't Sit Down' in
particular really moves w i t h
Mandel's guitar prodding it a-
long. The only weakness is the
' inherent one that old icistru-
mentals may get boring after
awhile, but if you like them at
all, this album offers them at
their very best.
The only weak album of the
lot is John Simon's Journey
(Warner Brothers BS 2663). Si-
mon has been a successful pro-
ducer for Simon and Garfunkel,
Leonard Cohen, and the Band;
he has even played as a session
pianist on several albums, bit
he is not a performer in his own
right. On this album he is back-
ed by hornmen Dave Bargeron,
Randy Brecker, Dave Sanborn,
and Howard Johnson, along with
other capable studio musicians;
the musicianship is good througn-
out, including Simon's piano. But
the songs are a collection of
weak melodies with mundane ly-
rics. To make things worse, Si-
mon's singing borders on t h e
atrocious. Simon would probably
be much better off sticking with
producing.

Music 's getting
back on its feet

7 & 9:30 p.m.

75c

Join The Daily Staff

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE PLAYERS
PRESENTS
PINTER'S
THE DUMBWAITER
and STRINDBERG'S
MISS JULIE

A satanicaly
funny movie.
-Jay Cocks, Time Magazine
g.R.-
MYSTERIES OF
THE ORGANISM
FRIDAY-SATURDAY
December 1 & 2
MODERN LANGUAGES AUD.
6:45-8:30-10:15
Friends of Newsreel
$1.25 Cont.

Daily Photo by DENNY GAINER
A glimpse at AN EVENING OF BLACK THEATRE, an oral read-
ing which captured portraits of and messages to black people,
presented last night by the Ann Arbor Black Theatre.

Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2t
East Quad Auditorium-8:00 P.M.
DONATION $1.00I

TON IGHT
NEW WORLD FILMS presents
MARLON BRANDO
in
THE WILD ONES
Outlaw club of thirty
motorcycle thugs take
over a s m a I I town'
defying the law and
terrorizing t h e citi-
zens for a day and a
night. Will Ann Arbor
be next?

1

OPNIG TONIGHT, 8 P.M.!
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS SHOWCASE
PRESENTS
"OLD TIMES"
by HAROLD PINTER
(An Experiment in New Theatre Forms)

Nov. 30, Dec. 3, 4
8:00 p.m.
PERFORMED AT THE
Community Center
Project
502 E. Washington

all seats $1.00"
Trueblood Box Office
Open 12:30-5:00 p.m.
Box Office 764-5387

6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Sewing skills
6:30 2 4 7 Newvs
9 Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 secretarial Techniques
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Bill Moyers' Journal
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Circus!'
7 Half the George Kirby
Comedy Hour
9 Movie
"Tarzan the Magnificient."
(English; 1960)
50 Hogan's Heroes
BACH CLUB
Thurs.., Nov. 30--8 p.m.
East Quad, Gre ueLounge
-PRESENTS-
VINCENT BRYSON, Flute
SCOTT KNIPE, Oboe
RUTH VANDER MOLEN, Clarinet
ROBERT EVENDON, French Horn
VICKI KING, Bassoon
--PERFORMING-
WORKS OF:
BACH
REIKA
ROTA
DEMASE
No Musical Knowledge Necessary
EVERYONE WELCOME
More Info: 763-6256
Refreshments & People

56 Behind the Lines
8:00 2 The Waltons
4 Flip Wilson
7 Mod Squad
56 Advocates
50 Dragnet
8:30 50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Movie
"Bandolero!" (1968)
7 Jigsaw
9 News
56 International Performance
9:30 9 Happy Though Married
10:00 4 Dean Martin
7 Owen Marshall
9 This Land
50 Perry Mason
10:30 9 Countrytime
56 Masterpiece Theatre
11:0024 7 9News
50 Golddiggers
11:20 9 Nightbeat
11:30 2 Movie
"The Sky Above-the Mud Be-
low." (French; 1962)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Comedy News
50 Movie
"The Vengeance of Fu Man-
chu." (English; 1967)
12:00 9 Movie
"Zita." (French; 1967)
1:00 4 News
7 Blue Angels
1:30 2 Movie
"Up in Smoke." (1957)
7 News
3:00 2 News
wcbn today
fm 89.5
9:00 Morning After Show
12:00 Progressive Rock
4:00 Folk
7:00 Talkback
8:00 Rhythm & Blues
11:00 Progressive Rock (runs 'til 3)
RAMBLE-2\M
SCROWE D
217 &ASH d2FPM--2AM

Maddy Prior

MODERN LANGUAGE BLDG. (Aud. 3)
SHOWS AT 7:30, 9:00, AND 10:00 P.M.
ONE NIGHT ONLY-ADMISSION $1.00

I

I

:*ALL SEATING UNRESERVED. (Because of the special nature of
this theatrical event, most of the audience will be seated on the
floor.)
DEPT. OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE

I

__

I

"'LADY SINGS 2nd SMASHj
THE BLUESH
A RED HOT rNG
-Gene Sholit, NBc-TV BLUES P
8.4 5 pm. 1-5 P.M.
Box Office Opens Bargain
12:45 Day
WHO IS THE MECHANIC?
.: ...... ...
:::tr:

Ch ULUR ALUEtAR
ART SPECIALS-Architecture and Design shows a multi-
media presentation of the works of Dana Atchley and
other artists this afternoon at 4 in the Arch. Aud. Archi-
tecture and Design deposits an art "time capsule", con-
taining some 150 art pieces, at the new A&D building
site at N. Campus this morning at 11.
DRAMA-U Players present Pinter's Old Times tonight at
8 in the People's Ballroom. RC Players present Strind-
berg's Miss Julia and Pinter's Dumbwaiter in the RC au-
ditorium at 8 tonight.
MUSIC-School of Music presents an Opera Workshop with
scenes from six operas in the SM Recital Hall at 8 to-
night. The School of Music also presents Ronald Copes
on violin at 8 tonight in Aud. 4, MLB.
FILM-Cinema Guild shows Ozu's Tokyo Story at 9:05 to-
night in Arch. Aud. 7. Daily Reviewer David Gruber says
this about the film:
"There is treasure for everyone in Tokyo Story,"
said Stanley Kauffman," and shame that we have all
had to wait so long for it." Kauffman and several other
critics have hailed Yasujiro Ozu's 1953 film, released only
recently in the U.S. and never shown before in Ann Ar-
bor, as a masterpiece of austerity, simplicity, and beauty.
It is a story of Japanese family life involving an elderly
couple traveling to Tokyo to visit their children, who
have grown apart from them. The children later return
the visit when they learn their mother is dying.
S. Quad Films presenst Butch Cassidy and the Sun-
dance Kid in S. Quad Dining Rm. Two at 7, 9:30 tonight.
The AA Film Co-op shows the Marx Brothers' Horse-
feathers tonight at 7, 8:45 in Aud. A. Daily reviewer Larry
Lempert comments:
Both Robben Fleming and Bo Schembechler could
learn a lot from this Marx Brothers free-for-all. As-
suming the presidency of an ailing college, Groucho
knows that the road to success leads straight through
the goal posts, and if that means hiring some spare
huskies (Chico and Harpo?) and attempting to kid-
nap the other team's leading jocks, so what? T
W}- Aa w aw

l 7

m

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