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November 29, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-29

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Wednesday, November 29, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, November 29, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

"LADY SINGS SMASH
THE BLUES' HIT WEEK!
A RED HOT sNS
SMASH!" THE
-Gene Shalit, NBC-TV
Fdmed in PANAVISION@. In COLOR A PAPAMOUNT PI T pF
231______________ Shows Times at Every
1:15-3:45-6:15- Wed.
8:45 p.m. 1-5 P.M.
Box Office Opens Bargain
12:45 Day
Theatre Phone 6W2-H24M A
WHO IS THE MECHANIC?

Renee's remarkable
rainy-day ramblings

By HERMAN BABCOCK
It's the mood of reflective
rainy-day ramblings, captured by
poetic lyrics and mellow music,
that at once attracted me to
Renee Armand's relatively un-
known first release The Rain
Book (A&M SP 4369).
Armand's clear resonant voice,
complemented by some excellent
work by back-up musicians that.
include Jim Gordon (formerly of
Delaney and Bonnie, Derek and
the Dominoes, and Traffic), Louis
Shelton, Danny Kotchemar (of
James Taylor's Section), and
Victor Feldmon, however, make
this album more than merely an
appealing mood piece.
There is quality here that,
once recognized, will surely bring
Armand into focus as a truly
talented vocalist and song-writer.
Her lyrics carry themes of un-
requited love and realtionships

inevitably faded. The words, as
Armand explained in an inter-
view, depict her past. "It seems
that the older I get, the less
able I am to get rid of all the
old things-the old loves, the
terrible disappointments, and the
dreams . . . they begin to come
back now .. ."
This return of memories is
well-recorded in her melancholy
lyrics. The old loves in "Does
Anybody Love You":
What's it like when you're
going
Are you getting there any
easier
On your side of town
And don't it feel strange
That I'm not around
To see you changing
The terrible disappointments in
"Raining in L.A." (which was
also cut as a 45):

Wrote a lot of words on an
empty page
To try and ask you what
I've done
I sent you letters, but you
never let on
You read a word of what I
said.
And the dreams in "England":
Someday when we get straight
we won't have time for
dying
We'll see the things we used
to see
Separately
Someday when we get straight
We'll go back to trying
To need the things we used
to be
Separately
Written with an imposing rain
motif, her lyrics create interest-
ing images. In "Falling Ladies,"
she uses the image of unbroken
circles to describe first musi-
cians, then children, then lovers
. . . she brings to this song a
comment on her album:
Summer to summer
In unbroken circles
Several players
Have chosen to stay
The music they've written
Is near to beginning
To say what they've chosen
The melodies that absorb her
lyrics flow gently .,. enhancing
the album's mood. While most of
the music relies on guitar, drums
and piano, occasional use of the
harp, flugle horns, violins, viola
and cello add a deep, rich sound.
While in college, Renee Armand
was a vocalist with the San Fran-
cisco State Jazz Band. During
the years that followed, she tour-
ed the California, Vegas, New
Mexico circuit, the Playboy cir-
cuit, joined Woody Herman's
straight big jazz band, and fin-
ally settled in Los Angeles to do
commercials. (You may recog-
nize her as a Toyota girl).
A&M Records recently an-
nounced that she has launched
an 11-city U.S. tour, which will
include a visit to Detroit, to pro-
mote The Rain Book. Hopefully
this will bring her the recognition
she deserves.
Do yourself a favor - if this
type of music appeals to you-
and stop by your local record
store and at least give Renne
Armand a listen.

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
'Old Times' opens Thursday
Pinter's "Old Times," presented by the University Players in conjunction with Project Community,
opens Thursday at the People's Ballroom. The dramatic group is taking a novel, experimental ap-
proach to its Showcase Production this year, and the results (see above) should be interesting.

OPENING TOMORROW, NOV. 30!
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS SHOWCASE
PRESENTS
by HAROLD PINTER
(An Experiment in New Theatre Forms)
Nov. 30, Dec. 3, 4\ all seats $1.00
8:00 p.m.
PERFORMED AT THE Trueblood Box Office
Community Center Open 12:30-5:00 p.m.
Project
502 E. Washington Box Office 764-5387
*ALL SEATING UNRESERVED. (Because of the special nature of
this theatrical event, most of the audience will be seated on the
floor.)
DEPT. OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE

Interesting art
show at Rack ham

By VERONICA S. GERAN
The second year graduate re-
view along withbthe Master of
Fine Arts exhibition of Jo Ann
Alber and MaxwellnDavis open-
ed Monday night at 8 o'clock in
the Rackham Galleries. Arather
large show, I think it exhibited
an interesting, highly imaginative
collection of art work on the
part of the two co-exhibitors, and
on the part of the graduate stu-
dents.
Jo Ann Alber contributed
prints, drawings, collages, and a
series of sculptures. The prints'
subject matter consisted of such
themes as teeth ("Your Teeth
are Like Stars"), polar bears,
a group of black and white
prints ("Bear on Rye to Go), and
sinks-illustrated and composed
as parts of the human anatomy in
an expressive manner, using a
bathroom mirror for the head,

The show YOU
ASKED FOR

-T2mnrbum
to-mmulmLlipj

DIAL
8-6416

Renee Armand

to

May well be
the most
beautiful film
ever made.
-Newsweek

And
).GGLawrlce's
frgiqr &,the J sy

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Eddie's Father
50 Flinstones
56 Maggie and the Beautiful
Machine
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Making Things Grow
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Zoom
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Family Classics
7 wild Kingdom
9 All Outdoors
50 Hogan'sHeroes
56 Consumer Game

8:00 2 Billy Graham Crusade
4 Winnie the Pooh and the
Blustery Day
7 Paul Lynde
9 Englebert Humperdinck
56 Population Growth
8:30 4 Hall of Fame
7 Movie
"The Heist"
50 Pro Hockey
9:00 2 Medical Center
9 News
9:30 9 Leaving Home
10:00 2 Cannon
4 All-Star Swing Festival
7 Julie Andrews
56 soul
11:00 2 4 7 9 News
50 Mancini Generation
11:20 9 Nightbeat
11:30 2 Movie
"Alexander's Ragtime Band."
(1938)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Comedy News
50 Movie
"Toward the Unknown."
(1956)
12:00 9 Movie
"The Plainsman." (1966)
1:00 4 News
7 Blue Angels
1:30 2 Movie
"Bandit Queen." (1950)
7 News
3:00 2 News
wcbn today

cutrI~JrE CALEINLAR
DRAMA-The AA Black Theatre presents An Evening of
Black Theatre at the Ann Arbor Community Center at
7:30. Admission is free. AA Civic Theatre performs Any-
thing Goes! at 8 in Mendelssohn. The RC Players present
Miss Julia by Strindberg and Pinter's Dumbwaiter at 8 in
the RC Auditorium.
MUSIC-A Chamber Music Student Recital presented by the
School of Music can be heard at 5 in the SM Recital Hall.
The School of Music also presents Jerome Jelinek on
cello and Joseph Gurt playing piano in Rackham at 8.
FILM-The AA Film Co-op screens Midnight Cowboy in Aud.
A at 7 and 9:30. Cinema Guild presents Bergman's
Winter Light at 7 and 9:05 in Arch. Aud. Night and Fog;
Interviews with My Lai Veterans can be seen at 4 in the
UGLI Multi-purpose Room, presented by the Psych. 171
Film Series.
ART-Second Year Grad Students along with Maxwell Davis
and Jo Ann Alber present their work today in the Rack-
ham Gallery. Art can also be seen in the Union Art
Gallery between 12 and 5.
UPCOMING DRAMA TIP-The University Players, in con-
junction with Project Community, will present its Show-
case Production of Pinter's Old Times at the People's
Ballroom on Thursday, Sunday and Monday.

and attaching legs underneath the
porcelain structure. There is also
a bathtub series in black and
white that carries you a step
further from the previous group.
Here, the artist makes beauti-
ful use of her imagination and
depicts an everyday object in an
allegorical sense ("Bathtub
Blues," "Bathtub Burial"). On
the other hand, the fascinating
"Midnight Run" bathtubs whiz
by us in a nightmarish dream,
next to which "Blood Bath" could
almost depict the result of their
colision.
Finally, one last group deserves
mention. In the pillow collages,
using one side as a "frame"
Alber creates a series of desert
scenes contrasted with the hour's
light: "High Noon," "Tucson at
12:00," "Cactus in the Sunset,"
etc.
Along with Jo Ann Alber's work
is the work of Maxwell Davis.
His work consists of ceramic,
bronze, raku, and sculpture, in
which he makes good use of me-
tallic glazes juxtaposed with fab-
ric, and a good amount of engi-
neering know-how.
However, this heavy earthen-
ware is oppressive. The eye
searches for a release invisual
tension as it would in a composi-
tion who's horizon line divides
directly across the center.
Maxwell Davis' plaques center
around human forms, which are
mostly "body-scapes" hinting at
the erotic.
In the same line is a group en-
- titled "Mothers' Brother" depict-
ing mummy-like figures with
electronically timed flashing
eyes: "Male Specimen," "Bags"
(figures squeezed shut in carpet
bag clay forms), and "Family"
mounds of clay with protuding
heads) sum up the artists con-
tributions through which one
walks as through a morbid cata-
comb.
The second year graduate re-
view across the hall from these
_artists is not as consistent or as
carefully set-up, but nevertheless
-a good amount of talent is cer-
tainly represented.
The low points of the show were
in the painting and industrial de-
sign, contrasted with a great
deal more good points in the

photography, printmaking, and
sculpture.
The strong work of Thomas
Shephard deserves mentioning.
His concern with solid structures
in relation to the space between
masses shows some well devel-
oped ideas. The same notion of
balance he carries through to
his photographs.
Stephen McMath's prints show
interesting concepts in land-
scapes, particularly in "Bakers-
field by 3 P.M."
David Bigelow's contributions
of drawings and prints were in-
teresting. His mountain-themes-
"Side Mountain Side," "A Real
Illusionary Mountain," and
"Death of the Queen"-were well
executed.
Sharron Pollack's drawings
were very good in rendering,
composition and theme. Of a sen-
sitive nature, "Here's How, Now
Where?" "Cover Up Bird," and
"Open Up" spoke almost poetic-
ally to the viewer.
In contrast to some of the
show's moods were the more
emotional and very alive prints
of Rufus Lavandas King. His
tone, one of protest, comes across
in his individual manner.
The show has many more in-
teresting contributions, all of
which should be seen. Take time
out and go to the Rackham Gal-
leries Show anytime through
December 20th.
Art Fair
Coming
SGC is sponsoring the Decem-
ber Art Fair to be held on Sun-'
day, Dec. 17, from 12 to 6 in the
Union Ballroom. The purpose of
the event is twofold: to give local
artists a chance to sell their
wares during Christmas shopping
days, and to provide the Ann
Arbor community with a'con-
venient, interesting, and inex-
pensive alternative to department
stores for their Christmas shop-
ping.
All amateur artists who wish to
sell their work are encouraged to
register for the fair. Payment of
the $5 fee secures the artist a
six foot table at the fair. Regis-
tration will start Nov. 27 and
continue through December 15.
Due to space limitations only
the first eighty applications can
be accepted, so register early.

9:00
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fm 89.5
Morning After Show
Progressive Rock
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Progressive Rock (runs 'til 3)

* STARTS FRIDAY AT THE _
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THE ULTIMATE EXPERIENCE FOR
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VOTED ONE OF THE TOP TEN FILMS
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