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November 28, 1972 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1972-11-28

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'rTuesday; November 2$, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

(' Tuesday, November 28, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

DOCTORS, NURSES, PSYCHOLOGISTS,
PEOPLE IN ALL MEDICAL AND
PROFESSIONAL FIELDS...
HELP SUPPORT A CONSUMER
ADVOCATE GROUP CONCERNED
WITH MEDICAL INFORMATION.
We Would Like To Add Your Name To Our
"Support" List. This Involves No Time Or Money
On Your Part Unless You Wish To Donate It.
ADVOCATES FOR MEDICAL INFORMATION
CALL 662-6598

0

Catch Bull
at Four*(meow)

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
as taught by
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI
s NATURAL TECHNIQUE DEVELOPS FULL
CREATIVE ABILITIES-
s PROVIDES DEEP REST AND RELAXATION
" LIFE EXPANDS IN FULFILLMENT
INTRODUCTORY
LECTURE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 29
1:00 and 8:00 p.m.
UGLI Multi-purpse Room
for further info, call 761-8255
0 3
p ~The SIGNET RINGv
a bright gift for Men and Women
G The Signet Ring is available in many styles in 10 and 14
Karat yellow gold. Hand engraved at no extra charge.
from $15.00 to $115.00
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tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 How Do Your Children Grow?
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 Jeannie
50 Glligan's Island
56 Your Right To Say It
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 French Chef
7:30 2 Billy Graham Crusade
4 You Asked fo It
7 Parent Game ,
9 Protectors
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Who Is?
8:00 4 Bonanza
7 Temperatures Rising
9 Bobby Sherman Show
56 Family Game
50 Dragnet-
8:30 2 Hawaii Five-O
7 Movie
"Home for the Holidays."
9 Pig 'n' Whistle
56 Bill Moyers' Journal
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 4 Bold Ones
9 News
56 Common Ground
9:30 2 Movie
"Pretty Poison"
9 Front Page Challenge
56 Black Journal
10:00 4 America
7 Marcus Welby, M.D.
9 Tuesday Night
50 Perry Mason
56 Detroit Black Journal
10:30 56 Artists in America
11:00 2 4 7 9 News
50 That Good Ole Nashville Music
11:20 9 Nightbeat
11:30 2 Movie
"Mambo."
4 Johnny Carson
7 Comedy News
50 Movie
"Love Me or Leave Me" (1955)
12:00 9 Movie
"The Champagne Murders."
(French; 1967)
1:00 4 News
7 Blue Angels
1:30 2 Movie
"Blondie's Hero." (1950)
7 News
3:00 2 News
wcbn today
fm 89.5
9:00 Morning After Show
12:00 Progressive Rock
4:00 Folk
7:00 This Week in Sports
8:00 Rhythm & Blues
11:00 Progressive Rock (runs 'til 3)
If yo ae iterst
e In review ing
poetry, and music.
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
arts: Contact Art;
Editor c/o The
drama, dance, film,
,hi an n Daiy.
TUES./WED.
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
Winter Light
1962. Second film in
Berg man 's trilogy on
faith. V i I I a g e pastor's
failure to communicate
with God & his fellow
man. People whose emo-
tional balance has been
jolted by the threat of the
Atom b o m b. A trying,
nerve-tangling film.
With Max von Sydow &
Ingrid Thulin.

THU./FRI.
Finally in Ann Arbor-
Tokyo Story
Architecture
Auditorium

Maigolds opens
"The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds," by
Pulitzer Prize dramatist Paul Ziindel, will be presented in the
Power Center this Saturday and Sunday by the Professional
Theatre Program. Performances at 3 and 8 p.m.
MUSIC-School of Music trumpet student recital this after-
noon at 12:30, SM Recital Hall.
DRAMA-Ann Arbor Civic Theatre opens Anything Goes! to-
night at 8, Mendelssohn.
POETRY-local poets Terry Alexander, Glenn Davis, Carolyn
Gregory, Jeff Justin, Ellen Zwig and Sandy read their
work tonight at 8:30, Mark's coffeehouse.
ART-second year University grad students present their
work today in the Rackham gallery,
FILMS:-Women's Studies Film Series presents Psychology
Constructs the Female tonight at 7, UGLI Multipurpose
room; Ann Arbor Film Co-op shows Truffaut's The Wild
Child tonight at 7, 8:45, Aud. A. About this film, Daily
reviewer Richard Glatzer comments:
In 1798, Jean Itard, a French doctor, was given cus-
tody of a completely uncivilized, 10-12 yr. old boy found
living wild in a forest near Aveyron. The Wild Child is
Francois Truffaut's faithful depiction of the doctor's at-
tempts at educating and molding the boy. Truffaut utilizes
archaic film techniques--iris-ins and beautiful black and
white photography (courtesy Eric Rohmer's cinematog-
rapher, Nestor Almendros)-to enhance the period fla-
vor of the film (something he repeats in his recent "Two
English Girls"). Yet he otherwise intelligently presents
his story in a simple, non-didactic method that allows
the film's engrossing subject matter to speak for itself.
The movie is dedicated to Jean-Pierre Leaud, so it is
somehow appropriate that it features thoroughly as-
tounding work by a new Truffaut child actor, Jean-
Pierre Cargol, in the title role. Not to mention Truffaut's
own acting debut as Itard. All in all, a truly fine film
that is nothing less than a paean to Man's capability for
order, morality, and humanity.
Cinema Guild shows Bergman's Winter Light tonight
at 7, 9:05, Arch. Aud. About this film, Daily reviewer
David Gruber comments:
Winter Light is an intense depiction of Bergman's
hard, gray reality. A pastor, having lost his faith in God,
falls into despair. His mistress, whom he at best only
tolerates, offers him love and companionship, which he
is reluctant to accept. Bergman has said that this is the
only film of his which, from start to finish, is exactly
the way he wanted it. In part, that means: bleak.
Information concerning happenings to be included in
Culture Calendar should be sent to Arts Editor c/o The Daily.
Att Arb Civ10
F+++
a seydi .* Men"
S:2v

By JAMES HAMM
The Cat may have nine lives,
but he lives them all in the same
style and his latest album Catch
Bull At Four (A&M SP 4365) will
verify that.
At first auditorial glance, Cat
Stevens' efforts may seem to be
merely a poor imitation of his
past successful albums. The mu-
sical arrangements are admitted-
ly typically his and may not even
be as good as on previous al-
bums.
And granted, his lyrical voice
and broad range are still ever
so present.
But the distinction of this new
release is its lyrics. We see a
man a bit older than before,
much more reflective and less
idealistic. His words now relate
to us experiences involving love,
depression and frustration.
His first important album, Tea
For the Tillerman, was by a
young, sensitive, concerned, and
in some ways innocent man. He
talks about ecology, the kind of
woman he's searching f o r,
dreams of things he must accom-
plish while he's young, question-
ing traditional values and pater-
nal values, and generally a
breaking out from youth into a
new awareness and maturity.
Teaser and the Firecat be-
came equally as popular as the
first album. The focus of this
work is almost exclusively Love,
where he is involved in rocky,
new, and old relationships. Two
songs deal with changing the
world and they too have the goal
of a kind of global love - or
specifically, peace.
Catch Bull at Four offers us a
different view of life through Cat
Stevens' eyes. Being older, he
takes the liberty to reminisce and
give advice on life. A sad and
beautiful song worth mention is
"The Boy with the Moon and
Star on his Head." In thenstory,
he meets a gardener's daughter
while walking to his wedding.
They hit it off rather well and
make love that afternoon. But he
soon leaves for the wedding cere-
mony. A year later, he finds a
basket on his doorstep with a
baby boy in it. As this boy grows,
he becomes very wise and people
from all around come to hear him
speak: "and Love is all . . . he
said."
Of course, my paraphrasing
hardly conveys the beauty and
tenderness of Cat Stevens' lyrics.
For example, his description of
the gardener's daughter: "Her

silver hair flowed in the air lay-
ing waves across the sun/Her
hands were like the white sands,
and her eyes had diamondson."
In another song Stevens deals
with finding a purpose in life. To
show the futility in trying to get
ahead, he ends witha statement
saying essentially, no matter how
hard you push, you'll end up
where you started from. Two ad-
ditional songs paint a gloomy
view of life on the plant if we
allow the unchecked destruction
of our natural resources to con-
tinue.
The final song, "Silent Sun-
light," gives advice to the young
from the old and experienced:
"There is work I must now be-
gin/All my dreams have blown
away . . ./Don't ever look be-
hind at the work you've done/
For your work has just begun."
Quite a change from his first al-
bum where he sang: "I don't
want to work anyway . . ./I
might die tonight!"
Most of the music on this al-
bum is unexciting, mainly be-
cause it sound much like his pre-

vious albums: very lyrical,
slightly sonorous at times, and
melodically simple. He needs a
fresh sound; not a different
sound completely, though, since
that would not be like himself,
but a sound possible inspired by
someone else and modified by
the Cat. His lyrics are still ex-
cellent.
Looking back, his evolutionary
change can be seen in the pho-
tographs of him in each album.
The first shows a young, rebel-
lious, idealistic man sitting in the
woods. The second, a more mel-
low, lovable and loving man with
a sense of peace of mind. The
third shows a somewhat haughty
man with a very carefree air
and a confident stance acting
quite in spite of what anyone
might tell him.
Oddly enough, this last image
is not indicative of the mood or
attitude conveyed by the music
and/or lyrics. Maybe he's glad
the album is finished; or possi-
bly, he is laughing at us for
buying his work which he may
not consider very good.
This idea can be extended to
the title and with a little extra-
polation read: Why don't you
Catch some of this bullshit at
four bucks and try to make some-
thing out of it. Anyway, what-
ever he may be thinking, I like
his latest work and the others
too, for that matter.

i

ARTS

.1
Watch out Stones!
... Hoo pie's here

By HARRY HAMMITT
The English are often much
more musically energetic than
the Americans. The Stones have
now firmly established them-
selves as the kings of contempar-
ary tough, loud rock 'n' rolleand
its immediate derivatives. Other
English bands have consciously
imitated the Stones to some ex-
tent, particularly the Faces, but
none have quite captured the
same tough raunchiness that has
epitomized much of the Stones'
music in the past few years.
Now comes a strong challenge

People 's Ballroom:
Coming together

r

"'PLAY IT AS IT LAYS'
IS A SMASH HIT!
It ranks high among the best movies
I've ever seen. One of the most
rewarding experiences you'll ever have
in a motion picture theatre."
-Rex Reed, Syndicated Columnist
"An acid-paved freeway trip which has
the sting of a rattlesnake! -N.Y. Daily News
"AN ORIGINAL WORK OF MOVIE ART."
-N.Y. Post
"Beautifully performed by
Tuesday Weld and Anthony Perkins."
-N.Y. Times
"FRANK PERRY'S BEST WORK BY FAR."
-Harper's Bazaar
"My Oscar bet for just about the
best of everything."-cosmopolitan Magazine
"AN IMPRESSIVE FILM."
-Gene Shalit, WNBC-TV
:. ~OMNICKDOUNfEANOFP FIMS INC PRESENT
A NEW
FRANK PERRY FILM

By SHAWN BENBOW
A magical transformation has
indeed taken place at the Peo-
ple's Community Center. Before
a wooden floor was laid and the
building of a stage was complet-
ed, the People's Ballroom was
nothing more than a barren au-
tomobile garage. Now a func-
tioning part of the center (502 E.
Washington) the People's Ball-
room hosts live rock entertain-
ment which includes a light show
produced by community people
and refreshments. Some of the
groups which have appeared at
the ballroom include The Mojo
Boogie Band, Radio King and the
Court of Rhythm, Leaves of
Grass, Detroit, and Stephen Gas-
kin and the Farm Band..
On Sunday mornings, Canter-
bury House holds services in the
ballroom which are open to ev-
eryone in the community.
The ballroom is also the tem-
porary home of the Collective
Eye Film Series, a group which
organized in September to pre-
sent films of current political in-
terest to the community.
A yoga class, a modern dance
class, a theatre group composed
of people from University Play-

ers and the community, are just
a few of the other community or-
ganizations that use the space
for rehearsals and meetings.:
On Sunday afternoons, jazz mu-
sicians come together to jam in
the ballroom.
Plansare in the making for a
creative arts program which will
include workshops in photogra-
phy, writing, macrame, painting
and candle making.
Few other places in Ann Arbor
attempt to serve such a diversity
of interests. The Ballroom Com-
mittee, which is part of the en-
tire Community Center Project
that includes Ozone House, Drug
Help, Matrix, and the Ann Arbor
Network, is interested, however,
in serving even a greater seg-
ment of the community.
"It (the ballroom) could be a
tremendous energy force able to
help the alternative community in
Ann Arbor come together-a fo-
cus point where people could get
into jams and express them-
selves through media," explains
People's Ballroom Committee
member Robin Giber. "It's new
and its growing and we need peo-
ple to help the ballroom take
form."

to the Stones' domination from a
band that was never that close to
Stones on any previous albums,
Mott the Hoople. The band has
now been taken under the wing
of recent underground superstar
David Bowie and he has infused
an incredible degree of nasty
punk intonmusic that was al-
ready extremely powerful. The
new album is called All the
Young Dudes (Columbia KC 31-
750); it's produced by Bowie who
also plays sax.
The music isn't like the Stones
verbatim, only one song has an
absolutely direct tie to anything
by the Stones, but the spirit of
simple, tough punky rock per-
vades the entire album. The only
song that owes allegiance to the
Stones is one called "Jerkin'
Crocus" which musically is as
close to "Brown Sugar" assa
song can be without being
"Brown Sugar."
The song is just as powerful.
and pulsating as the Stones;gui-
tarist Mick Ralphs is no match
for the likes of Mick Taylor, but
he can certainly hold his own as
a rock guitarist.
In reality, the album surpasses
the Stones. There is nothing ov-
erly new on the album in terms
of music, but the music is al-
ways quite tuneful and much
more imaginative than the worn-
out patterns of the Stones.
There are a few other things
besides punk rock on the al-
bum. "Sea Diver" is an exquisite
little number straight out of the
Procul Harum vein. Bowie's own
song, "All the Young Dudes,"
epitomizes tough punkiness in its
lyrics, but the music is quite
melodic and graceful, featuring
some of the finest Beatlesque
harmonies since the Beatles
themselves.
The-band also does Lou Reed's
"Sweet Jane" which moves at a
decent clip, but never sinks into
a morass of energy.
The band is musically sound,
Ralphs is powerful and clear on
guitar; the rhythm section of
Overend Watts on bass and Ruf-
fin on drums is always simple
and strong.
The vocals are clear, but not
overly powerful; lead singerIan
Hunter sings a little bit like Dy
lan, but with more clarity and
power.' Ralphs and organist
Verden Allen sing background
and each take lead on one song.
Bowie's saxes add some interest-
ing counterpoint, but are not
really very necessary. The al-
bum's punkiness is further en-
hanced by some purposefully
shoddy editing with phones ring-
ing and false starts. _
The album is exceptionally fine
for- a straightforward rock al-
bum. The band first became es-
tablished with their contempor-
ary classic, "Rock 'N' Roll
Queen," but then faded into the
background. Now they're back
in strength, and All the Young
Dudes shows that they are in-
deed a force to be reckoned with.
y/Ja g

-____-____-___

7&9p.m.

75c

"'LA
'LA
TH E
A RI
SMA
m i
-Gene shalit

Y SINGS 2nd SMASH
UHIT WEEK! I
B LUES
HOT DY
ED SINGS
kS~vm"THE
,NBC-TV BLUES ~
Filmed in PANAVISION® " In COLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTUPF

I I

I

TUESOAY WE
BEST PERFORM!
1972 VENICE FILM

TUESDAY WELO ANTHONY PERKINS
'PLAY IT AS IT LAYS"
K~oJAMMY GRIMES-ADAM RARJKE
LANCE I'm 1n ,ict
FESTIVAL oNmwI OAN GREGORY OUNNE" JOAN DIDIOJN
FRANK PERRY D UMlNCK 0011ff 'RANK PERRY A 0ISML IM " 11CHNCK"01

l

RD

JEAN-PIERRE CARGOL and FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT in TRUFFAUT'S
THE WILD C
(French language-English subtitles)
The true story of a boy found running wild in a French forest in 1798. Are the attempts of Dr. Itard
(played by Truffaut) to "civilize" him humane, or, ultimately, cruel?
"THE WILD CHILD is moving and inspiring and is an important film because of what its says about
the depths of kindness and goodness of which man is occasionally capable. It renews the faith and
hope all of us can use these days."-FILMS IN REVIEW.
-TONIGHT!-Nov. 28th-ONLY!- 35mm. 7 & 8:45 p.m.
.. S .l . t . _ -. --- - -. .-

STARTS WEDNESDAY

'231_____________ WED. IS BARGAIN DAY!
Adults 75c-1-5 P.M. Wed.!!
BOX OFFICE OPEN 12:45 P.M.
SHOW TIMES AT
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45 P.M.
WHO IS THE MECHANIC?

N
I ~ All Ite

I1

,I

)W OPEN !
ns Handmade Including

ms 7-9700l-.

L

1

" HANDWOVEN RUGS
" SHEEPSKIN COATS

11

III

;ii

111

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