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November 19, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-19

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 19, 1972

PageTwo THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 19, 1972

1

Rhodesia: Growing discrimination
SALISBURY, Rhodesia (Reuters) - white and black leaders. the settlement is pushed through, t h e change the African vote on the grounds
The Rhodesian government's proposed The African National Council (ANC) passing of future discriminatory legisla- that a little improvement is better than
new legislation to control the move- has condemned the bill, describing it as tion would be outlawed. However, dis- none at all.
ment of Africans is expected to be fol- an "abominable piece of legislation." criminatory legislation already on the On the surface, the government has
lowed by further apartheid-style b il s "The repercussions of such legislation statute books would only be subject to done its best recently to become unpop-
during the current session of Parliament, are bound to be graver than the Rhodes- review by a commission. ular with large numbers of Africans,

l

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political sources said yesterday.
They said the government next week
will bring in an amended version of
the Property Owners Protection Bill, de-
signed to preclude non-whites from liv-
ing in white suburbs.
The government is also likely to try
to amend existing legislation.to make it
illegal for unions to have both white
and black members, they added.
Coming so soon after a new identity
card bill which passed its first reading
on Friday, the proposed legislation is
likely to lead to a major debate in Par-
lia~ment next week.
Already the new card regulations,
which require Africans to carry identifi-
cation cards at .all times and to obtain
a permit before leaving the country,
have met with strong criticism from both

ian front regime is prepared to antici-
pate," said the ANC's deputy leader, the
Rev. Canaan Banana.
The ANC said it found it strange that
the government should be introducing
such discriminatory legislation at a time
when it is trying to make contact with
Africans through the ANC.
"Our patience with such double-deal-
ing is wearing thin," Banana said.
Observers said Prime Minister Ian
Smith and his party are introducing the
discriminatory legislation, similar to
South Africa's apartheid laws, in the be-
lief that they will get Africans to change
their "no" vote on last year's Anglo-Rho-
desian settlement terms into a "yes."
The rejected terms would have let
white minority rule continue indefinitely.
If Africans do change their decision and

Consequently, observers suggested
Smith's party wants to get as much dis-
criminatory legislation as possible on the
books before going to Britain and saying
that Africans have changed their minds
about last November's settlement terms.
The only flaw in this argument is that
Africans are unlikely to change their
minds and that in any case, the ANC has
said that a settlement must be negotiated
with African participation before it will
be acceptable.
Another theory is that the government
is simply trying to show Africans how
tough things wil be now that the settle-
ment has been rejected.
Political observers argue that by in-
troducing large numbers of unpopular
bills the government could hope to

particularly the better-educated and
more politically motivated.
Since the settlement terms were re-
jected, it has introduced a number of
measures which have been unpopular
among Africans.
Earlier this year, it angered the ANC
by announcing plans for provincialization,
which will mean the establishment of
separate parliaments or assemblies for
Africans in rural areas.
Then on Nov. 1, it introduced legisla-
tion making it illegal for Africans to
drink at bars in white areas after cer-
tain hours.
The legislation was declared illegal by
the high court this week but the gov-
ernment has announced its intention of
appealing against the court's decision.

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W .Ger
By the AP, UPI and Reuters
BONN - West German Chan-
cellor Willy Brandt and his Chris-
tian Democratic rival, Rainer
Barzel, were reported running
neck-and-neck by public opinion
polls yesterday on the eve of par-
liamentary elections they hoped
would break the parliamentary
deadlock that has paralyzed pub-
lic business since May.
The opinion polls predicted a
close finish in today's voting.
But they favored Brandt's gov-
ernment coalition of Social Dem-

,mans face close election

ocrats and Free Democrats to-
gether to have a slight edge over
the Christian Democrats.
The major issues are Brandt's
policies of reconciliation with the
Communist governments in East-
ern Europe and his govern-
ment's failure to prevent price
rises averaging between six and
seven per cent this year.
In his final campaign speech,
Brandt declared yesterday that
his re-election will insure the
signing of his treaty with East
Germany and hasten an end to

CHINESE OPPOSED:
Ben galis in UN?
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters)- sia, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal,
Twenty-two countries representing New Zealand, Poland, Senegal and
a broad political spectrum pro- Yugoslavia sponsored yesterday's
posed yesterday the admission of resolution, which is expected to
Bangladesh to the United Nations be debated within the next two
"at an early date" despite contin- weeks.
uing opposition from China. Their draft would have the as-
They submitted a resolution to sembly reaffirm "the principle of
the General Assembly under an universality of membership of the
item on "admission of new mem- United Nations in accordance with
bers to the United Nations" sub- the charter" and consider that
mitted to the agenda by Yugo- Bangladesh was "eligible for mem-
slavia with the aim of revering bership in the United Nations."
the security councils refusal, be-
cause of a Chinese veto, to clear.
Bangladesh for entry.
China will continue to veto the Have a flair for
admission of Bangladesh to the artistic writing?
United Nations until India returns If you are interest-
91,000 Pakistani military and ci- Ied in r ev i e %% i n g
vilian war prisoners, President poetry, and music.
Zulfiqar All Bhutto of Pakistan or writing feature
suaiq eta y. stories ab o ut the
said yesterday. arts: Contact ArtE
Australia, Barbados, Bhutan, Edit r, c/a The
Bulgaria, Canada, Central African Mdchigan Daily.
Republic, Columbia, Costa Rica,
Cyprus, Denmark, El Salvador,
Hungary, Jamaica, Kenya, Malay-

the shootings along the border.
Barzel has said he would seek
to renegotiate terms of the East-
West Germany treaty.
The treaty clears the way for
the two Germanys to apply for
United Nations membership and
provides for greater human con-
tact across the death strip bor-
der.
East Berlin has promised hum-
anitarian steps, such as reunit-
ing of divided families, if the
treaty is signed and ratified.
Agreement on the treaty is ex-
pected to boost Brandt's chances
of being returned to power since
it marks another crucial state in
his "Ostpolitik," the policy of
rapprochement with the east
which helped to win him the No-
bel Peace Prize last year.
Brandt, Germany's first So-
cial D e m o c r a t i c gov-
ernment chief in 40 years, came
to power in 1969, but only with
the help of Walter Scheel's tiny
Free Democratic Party.
When they took office, Brandt
and Scheel had a majority of
only 12 seats in the 496-member
Bundestag lower house of par-
liament.
Defections quickly whittled
that downsuntil their majority
was wiped out during the debates
over treaties with the Soviet
Union and Poland.
Asa result of the deadlock, the
government was unable to put
through its budget and other con-
troversial legislation. The pacts
were approved only because the
opposition Christian Democrats
agreed to abstain.
A clear-cut victory for the
Christian Democrats (CDU),
would be a blow to the Brandt-
initiated policy of rapprochement
with the communist east, and
would revitalize the CDU, which
held power for 20 years until it

gave way to Brandt and his free
democrat partners three years
ago.
If Brandt wins and forms an-
other coalition, it will confirm
the leftward trend of recent
years in West German Politics
and extend his hold on power for
a second term.

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