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November 14, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-14

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 14, 1972

Pag EightkTHEMICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, November 14, 1972
HARVEY AWAY:
.~**. *~*~*Republicans refuse to announce O ig e
zu t . , TOi g e
1 n n n nnudi AMY r_ r i' l\ ti0

restates three

iuriuers oi puuvuu uonauion

(Continued from Page 1) holders in New Jersey.
the courts, could open a major The club's 15th day pre-election
loophole in the elections law which report-dated Nov. 7, the day of
took effect last April 7. the election-listed all the $3,000
The club contends its money contributions to Nixon committees,
came from dues and that dues are but it omitted the names of indi-
not contributions. GAO auditors viduals who contributed to the club.
say there could be a proliferation None of the reports listed a cash
of such clubs to evade the full dis- balance, mentioning the $100,000
closure provisions of the new law. taken in and given out only as
The auditors say they will press transfers.
the club for disclosure, possibly a .......
launching a field audit in the next
few weeks and then turning their DA ILY F I I
findings over to the Justice De-'
partment if the club remains ada- ~ ..............
mant. The Daily Official Bulletin is an
Under the new law, the GAO, an official publication of the Univer-
arm of Congress, must investigate sity of Michigan. Notices should be
campaign finance irregularities. sentin TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
I409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
But only the Justice Department the day preceding publication and
can prosecute. by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
The name of the Executive Club Sunday.Items appear once only.
first emerged in October irf re-
ports by national and state-level Ll
Finance Committees to Re-elect
ported contributing $3,000 to each ;
of 33 Nixon committees and $1,000 p
to a 34th.
Newsmen seeking identification (Continued from Page 1)
of the individual contributors could fountains, tables and lounges could
find no record of the club having be used by the Sckugs.
registered with the GO rtnor of is sFortwodays one group will be
having filed any reports of ex-j Sckugs and the other Hyeklops.
penditures or contributions.
__EThen thev will reverse their roles.

Colsey, who could not be reached
for comment, told the GAO th-t
the club's funds came from $1,000
dues charged each member. He
said dues do not fall within the
law's definition of contributions.
But GAO auditors say that !he
minute the club began contribut-
ing to the presidential election, it
became a national political com-
mittee under the act.

(Continued from Page 1)
agreed yesterday that there was
no documentation to the contrary,
he hastened to add, "There is no
documentation at all in this case."
Owings himself claimed that this
political activity rumor was just
that, a rumor. "In fact, one of the
three didn't do a thing for me,"
he said. He agreed with Childs
that the whole Brouhaha was a
matter of correct union procedures,
which "someone had attempted to

tie political overtones to."
Another party in this whole
drama is the successful candidate
in the sheriff race, Democrat Fred
Postill. Postill claims that those
fired happened to be the first to
catch Harvey's eye on the day
after Harvey lost the election.
For the moment, the three have
their jobs back-pending Harvey's
return. Owings says he doesn't
know what will happen then.
"Either he'll uphold it or he'll re-
verse it. This time, though, he'll
have to provide a reason why."
We Want To Be
Your Barber
DASCOLA BARBERS
Arborland
E. Univ. at So. Univ.
E. Liberty off State
Maple Village

4I

AL BULLETIN ~ ~
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
1972 CHRISTMASGEETINGS1972
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 EE GS17

)

AP Photo
Not a pie in the sky...
University President Archibald Woodruff and student government president Eric Litsky meet the press
after squaring off in a custard pie duel at the University of Hartford yesterday. The duel highlighted
a student-inspired "Day of Insanity" on the campus.
FACILITIES LACKING:
I Space for everyone?

(Continued from Page 1) tramural sports. brought Wisconsin a new intramur- The new law requires that any
"they're at the point where they At Michigan State, basketball al and recreation building with an committee which anticipates col-
are in need of major repairs." and tennis buffs can take advan- ice rink, a new track, and bas- lecting or spending more than
On campus, there are no indoor ! tage of the Men's Intramural ketball and volleyball courts. $1,000 for a national candidate in
tennis courts to speak of, unless Building - with four floors of Ohio State faces a problem simi- any calendar year must register,
one considers those slick basketball gym s p a c e, seven basketball lar to Michigan's. The Bucks have with the GAO. It also must file
floors in the IM Building tennis courts, eight tennis courts, and 12 only seven basketball courts for periodic reports of all contribu-
courts. Even those, however, are volleyball courts. MSU's Women's student use and only one indoor tions and expenditures of more
rarely available to students. Intramural Building has five more tennis court. There is also a re- than $100 and must show how much
While other Big Ten schools basketball courts, while Jenison quired physical education program cash was on hand at the time of
have year round recreational. hoc- Fieldhouse, the varsity basketball at Ohio State which greatly cuts each filing.
key at their ice rinks, Michigan's arena, provides two more full into the time available for recrea- After n e w s stories appeared
Coliseum is only open five months courts and two half courts. tion and intramurals. about the committee, its chairman,
a year, since the ice plant cannot Two of the Men's IM Building The Buckeyes' varsity basketball William Colsey, a Mount Holly,
maintain an ice surface during floors are generally free , play arena is available to students in N.J., attorney, filed a registration
the warmer months. areas, while one other floor is used the evenings - unlike Michigan's statement and reports for Sept. 10
Though lavish in design, Crisler for students who wish to reserve Crisler Arena. and for the 15th and 5th days be-
arena has often been called a courts - a practice now extinct Although the facility situation at fore the Nov. 7 election, the dead-
functional disaster. The arena is at Michigan. Michigan is bad, it has been im- lines set by the law.
so costly to keep open ($86,155 last Michigan has ten basketball proved over the last several years But Colsey, in a separate letter
year for utilities alone) that it is courts. Unfortunately, six of those due to the opening of several var- to the GAO and in comments af-
economically unfeasible to use it are located in Waterman and Bar- sity areas to students. Ferry Field fixed to each report, said the club
for anything but varsity sports bour gyms, and they can be con- is now available to students and ws formed "on a local basis" and
and paid rentals. sidered adequate at best. That club sports teams where varsity "to provide a means of informal
Yost ied e ir leaves only four IM Building athletics previously had complete communication between the gover-
Yost Fieldhouse is only used four leaves ornthemorthnBuildinm-control. nor" and other Republican office-
hours a day by the Athletic De- courts for the more than 300 com- ThTatn urpaciefo- -
partment. But the present condi- peting intramural teams. With that The Tartan Turf practice foot
Pt n t f hipites hton many hoopsters for so few courts, ball field is used for club sports
Lion of its facilities, such as tarn teei itetm o repa and for intramurals while Michi-
up basketball courts, make it rela- there is little time for free play an Stadium has been used byithe
tiv1ly unuseable for intramurals or during basketball season. .Hg'an ihd be y t he
recreation. Wisconsin, by its own admission, othe soccer teams on at least one
itheisoccer teams.onnataleast one
Outdoor facilities are in less is in good shape. Intramural Di- occasion.
critical condition. One problem, rector Jack Nowka said, "There is The Tartan practice field was
though, is the location of fields no squeeze at Wisconsin. We are completed and lighted in time for
and when those fields can be used. very well blessed with facilities." the Fall, 1969, allowing the area
For example, the pasture called The Badger's Neilson Tennis on Ferry Field to be used for
Palmer field is totally insufficient Stadium is a brand-new 12 court recreation. The varsity track has
to meet the needs of the five large building that is open year round. also been opened up to the general
dormitories on the hill, particu- A new remodeling job on the for- student body and was resurfaced
larly in the fall when softball and mer Intercollegiate Fieldhouse has for the beginning of this term.
football conflict. But if students-
are ambitious enough to do a little
hiking, they can find ample field
space elsewhere on campus.
Another problem is lighting. On- ~4 4rin ~ iiii
Wyines Field and the Tahtng.uf 4n-J
practice field are currently suit-
able for evening use. Lighting ad--i
ditional fields would solve most of
the problems concerning field
availability.
The University is fortunately
blessed with a pair of 18-hole
small par-3 course.
The University course, how-
ever, is often overcrowded while
picturesque Radrick Farms on
Geddes Rd. - considered one of
the best courses in the Midwest -
is unavailable to students.
A glance at other Big Ten uni-
versities gives a good assessment
of where Michigan stands on in-

1101L1y W1 GA .11 V . '
To keep the "discrimination"
going, you need enforcers. For the
experiment Giles chose members
of his class and the Lloyd staff for
this role-the "Klucks."
While a number of people have
been trying to subvert the experi-
ment, most of those involved have
participated along the guidelines
set up by Giles.
"It will most benefit those who
take it (the experiment) serious-
ly," Giles said.
But they aren't enjoying it. One
Sckug woman put it succinctly
when she said, "It's a pain in the
ass."
However the Klucks claim they
have it the worst, trying to enforce
discriminatory rules against their
friends. Nic Clement, one of the
Klucks, said he has found it's
hard to "play the pig."
Next Sunday, a mass meeting
will be held to discuss the effects
of the experiment.

DAY CALENDAR
School of Music: wind Instrument
Dept. Recital, SM Recital Hall, 12:30
pm.
LSA Coffee Hour: English dept., Hop-
wood Rm., Angell Hall, 3 pm.
School of Music: C. L. Seeger, Inst.
of Ethnomusicology, UCLA, "The En-
glish Language and Musicology,"
Chrysler Aud., 4 pm.
Prog. in Engineering for Public Sys-
tems: J. H. Holloman, MIT, "Technolo-
gy and Social Issues," 311 w. Engin.,
4 pm.
Extension Service-English Lang. &
Lit: Poetry reading, Coleman Barks,
UGLI Multipurpose Rm., 4:10 pm.
Residential College Renaissance Dra-
ma Film: "Le Misanthrope," no sub-
titles, R. C. Aud., 7 pm.
Computing Center: L. Flanigan, J.
Henriksen, "Simscriut-1I: CAMP," Sem-
inar Rm., Comp. Ctr., 7:30 pm.
School of Music: Contemporary Di-
rections, S. Hodkinson, conductor, SM
Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Musical Society: Guitar Series, Chris-
topher Parkening, Rackham Aud., 8:30
pmn.
Rive Gauche: Japanese Language
night, 1024 Hill St., 9 pm.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
SENIORS: The new School of Social
work at the Univ. of Minnesota, Du-
luth, currently recruiting students for
their 18-month MSW program begin-
nin g in Jnuari. Nov. 30 is deadline for
completed applications.
UNITED NATIONS TRAINING SER-
VICE-TRANSLATORS EXAMS SCHED-
ULE FOR 1973: Spanish (Jan 17-18)
deadline for application is Dec. 1;
Frenche(April 4-5) deadline is Feb. 9;
En-lish (May= 9-10) deadline Ma . 23;
Arabic (June6-7) deadline April 20. Test
will be given in New York. Inquire for
add. info: The Secretariat Recruitment
Service, Office of Personnel Services
(Room 3601 H), United Nations, N.Y.,
N.Y. 10017.

Join The Daily
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8-10 p-m.
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