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November 12, 1972 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1972-11-12

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Sundoy, November 12, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sever

Sund0y, November 12, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Sevei

Michigan:

alone

on

I - -

By ELLIOT LEGOW
Special to The Daily
IOWA CITY-It wasn't bor-
ing, but it wasn't really excit-
ing either yesterday as Michi-
gan romped to its ninth con-
secutive football victory, 31-0,
over Iowa. What it was, was
well-executed football as the
Wolverines bounced back from
an erratic performance at In-
diana last weekend to seize
undisputed control of first
place in the Big Ten.
With Ohio State's 19-12 upset loss
at the hands of Michigan State,
Coach Bo Schembechler's crew,
leading the nation in scoring de-
fense after recording its fourth
shutout, remains as the only un-
beaten team left in the Big Ten.
Schembechler w a s extremely
pleased with his team's near-
p e r f e ct performance, marred
only by one fourth-quarter fum-
ble, in a game which could
boast no individual stars.
"We played good early. It was
easy in the second half. That's
about it," Bo cheerfully summed

SUNDAY SPORTS
NIGHT EDITORS: FRANK LONGO and CHUCK BLOOM

Then Franklin took to the air for
the first time, spotting Paul Seal
deep in the secondary and con-
necting for 26 yards with his big
tight end. T h o r n b l a d h drove
through the right side for 16 more
on the next play, carrying Mich-
igan to the Iowa 11, and scored his
touchdown two plays later.
Freshman quarterback B u t c h
Caldwell, one of three frosh who
started for F r a n k Lauterbur's
Hawkeyes and one of 16 first-year

yrp) a gain
30 yards and give the Wolverines seat of his pants at the Iowa 29,
a 10-0 edge. slipping on the wet Astroturf
Iowa came back with a drive of after a 33 yard run.
its own, gaining 40 yards in 12 Chuck Heater quickly burst over
plays, relying on a long gain of 16 right tackle for 22 yards to the
by tailback Dave Harris and a 13- seven, but three tries by Thorn-
yard pass from Caldwell to fresh- bladh left Michigan one yard short
man Rod Wellington. But Harris of the endzone on fourth down,
was nailed for a three-yard loss Franklin took care of that problem
by Roy Burks on a first down at himself faking to Thornbladh up
Michigan's 35 and two passes the middle and rolling around right
couldn't pick up the needed yard- end for the touchdown.
age. The teams exchanedsotn-

naturally

things up after the game.
Michigan's early scoring included
a touchdown and a field goal in
the first quarter, a touchdown pass
in the second period, and two more
quick scores to start the second
half.
On offense the heroes, if there
must be some, were quarterback
Dennis Franklin and fullback Bob
Thornbladh. But more important
than these individual accomplish-
ments was the team's flawless
execution.
Franklin connected on two
touchdown passes, one of 15 yards
to Paul Seal, and the other on a
37-yard sideline bomb to Gil
Chapman. Thornbladh was the

leading performer on the ground
netting 98 yards in 21 carries in
what Schembechler described as
"the second straight game he's
given us some punch inside"
while subbing for the injured Ed
Shuttlesworth.

men who saw action
tried out the Michi
on Iowa's first se
success.
Michigan quickly
back on its 33, and
of two Iowa penaltie

Thornbladh s c o r e d Michigan's Thornbladh carries
first touchdown on a five-yard gal- one by Haslerig for
lop over right tackle as the Wol- Iowa's 28. Haslerig
verines marched 66 yards after the right end to Iowa'ss
opening kickoff against what was first down, but a cli
supposed to be a tough Hawkeye lified the gain and
defense. igan back.
Schembechler tried a little some-, Franklin got Mic
thing different in that initial series first down witha
as wingback Clint Haslerig was scramble and a se
called on three straight times, to Thornbladh, bu
carrying the ball to the Michigan stalled at the 13 an
147 came in to boot a

n in the game, Harry Kokolus attempted a 44-
igan secondary yard field goal, but his try was
ries for little short. As it turned out that was to
be Iowa's best chance at a score
had the ball all day. Containing Harris, who
with the help had rushed for 538 yards in the
s and a couple Hawkeyes' previous eight battles,
netting 14 and to only two net yards was the key
five, drove to to Michigan's defensive success.
swept around Only one more Michigan score
six on the next resulted in the first half, as the
pping call nul- Wolverines moved the ball well but
pushed Mich- never started in good field posi-
tion. The one scoring drive of the
higan another second period featured three suc-
an eight-yard cessful Franklin passes, to Thorn-
ven-yard pass bladh for 11, to Haslerig for 11
ut the drive more, and to Seal for 15 and the
d Mike Lantry touchdown.
field goal of Schembechler was pleased with
the 17-0 halftime lead over what
he termed "a much improved"
Hawkeye team, especially in con-
ING ytrast to the narrow 7-0 advant-
No. Yds. age his team took into the locker
2 41 room last week at Indiana.
2 18 That lead quickly became 24-0
1 11 at 3:52 of the second half when
1 3 Dave Brown pulled in a punt at
GNo. Yds. Av. the Michigan 38, sped down the
4 130 32.5 right side and wound up on the

sessions of the ball for the next
seven minutes until Michigan took
over on the Iowa 37 after a short
punt and a nine-yard Brown return.
Then Franklin and Chapman con-
nected on the year's prettiest
touchdown b o m b. As Chapman
streaked down the right sideline
Franklin lofted a pass just over his
left shoulder which Chapman took
in at the three and tightroped into
the endzone with the score.
Schembechler is now quite
ready for the season's big two
game finale with co-Rose Bowl
contenders, Purdue and Ohio
State. "The season has come
down just like we figured," Sch-
embechler said. "We have to win
those two. Our toughest two
games are coming up."
Atlhough Shuttlesworth saw no
action Bo said he could have been
used if needed and indicated that
Shuttlesworth as well as middle
guard Greg Ellis who remained in
Ann Arbor this weekend will be
ready for plenty of action when
the Boilermakers come to town for
the start of the second season next
Saturday.

c tokens
___________________Bob Andrews -

.t

The scent of roses .. .

I
1

Thumping the Hawkeyes...
.. phase II beginsj
THE MICHIGAN Wolverines completed phase I in their quest
to attain a perfect 1972 season yesterday as Bo and Company
solidly thrashed Iowa 31-0 for their ninth straight victory in as
many games.e'
At this juncture of the season last year, in an identical
situation, Michigan polished off an impressive initial phase maul-
ing the lowly Hawkeyes for victory number nine, only to find
the narrow conquests in phase II over Purdue and Ohio State
heart-stopping affairs. The fatal blow could not penetrate the
tide of the Blue Wave until the California jinx and pesty Stanford
joined forces to doom the Wolverines in still another cardiac-
arrester.
So now phase II starts again with the same pair of tough
conference foes anxiously awaiting their chance to disrupt Mich-
igan's regular season victory string, which currently stands at 20.
In preparation for this most arduous task that lies in the
immediate future, the Wolverines convincingly rebounded from
their sloppy victory last week at Indiana as both the offense and
defense performed a solid sixty minutes of "boring" football.
In the post-game press conference, Hawkeye mentor
Frank Lauterbur bestowed numerous praises upon "one of
the finer teams in the country today." However, before the
reporters surrounding him were ready to digest his accolades,
they listened intently to hear any terse summation he had to
offer with regards to the contest. (We all recall his famous
no-no that caused much commotion a year ago.)
Perhaps he was satisfied with "closeness" of the final score
or possibly the boys on top cautioned him about his choice of
words, but ,Lauterbur shattered the building suspense with a
smile stating, "No bad comments this year." What a letdown!
Then his compliments for the Wolverines and criticisms of
the Hawkeyes started flying. In praising Michigan, he put
special emphasis on the sophomore quarterback, Dennis Frank-
lin, who enjoyed his best day of the season, connecting on 6 of
11 aerials for. 107 yards and two touchdowns. He also ran for a
TD from one yard out.
Lauterbur commented, "Franklin gives you that moment
of indecision (on defense) and with him Michigan is a better
offensive team than a year ago. He does everything well
just like the entire team."
Then he turned to the Hawkeye efforts for the afternoon
and cited the numerous mistakes Iowa made as the major rea-
son for defeat. However, the 31-0 whitewash might not seem as
bad as it does on paper when you consider that a total of 16
freshmen played for the Hawkeyes, while Michigan played none.
Lauterbur, realizing he must go with youth to rebuild a
football power at Iowa, philosophically stated, "A lot of our
mistakes were caused by youth, but there's nothing else to
say on that matter except that they'll get better."
One of those first-year players was starting quarterback Butch
Caldwell, who got the call over senior Kyle Skogman and sopho-
more Bobby Ousley. His performance for the day was not overly
impressive, but he did complete nine passes for 93 yards and in
periods of the first half he rattled the Michigan secondary with
passes up the middle.
In the Michigan locker room, Schembechler appeared to
be in a more jovial mood than normal, adding some wise-
cracks to his more serious comments about the game.
In discussing the freshman situation at Iowa, he said, "It's
tough to keep that enthusiasm year after year. I don't know
how they'll be in four years. Our seniors have played great
football this year but I wonder how they'd be playing if this
were their junior year."
Then he let loose with one of Bo's boners, "The Hawkeyes
are much improved. I'd say they are twice as good as a year
ago; you could tell that by the score."
d1.^" . ...... { i "':' :.:r.::e. rr .^r ..r... ......:? ;}.{;;r
SCORESj
GRIDDE PICKINGS North Carolina 23, Virginia 3
CnTU1IIJAW1r4 I

TOTAL FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
NET YARDS GAINED
RUSHING
Number of Rushes
NET YARDS GAINED
PASSING
Number attempted
Number completed
Number intercepted
TOTAL PLAYS
TOTAL NET YARDS
GAINED
KICK RETURN YARDAGE
Punt returns, Number
Kickoff returns, Number
PUNTS
Number of Punts
Average Yards
Had Blocked
FUMBLES (No./Lost)
INTERCEPTIONS
(Number/Yards)
PENALTIES
(Number/Yards)
MICHIGAN
RUSHING

MICH
21.
13
5
3

IOWA
13
8
4
1

Seal
Thorndladh
Haslerig
Chapman

251 117
54 44

AP Photo
IOWA BALLCARRIER Dave Harris (12) wasn't going anywhere
on this play in yesterday's 31-0 Michigan victory at Iowa City.
Barry Dotzauer (25) makes the tackle in helping seal the Wol-
verines' fourth shutout of the season.

PUNTIN

107
12
6
1
66
358
65
9
1
4
4
32.5
1-1

93
23
9
1
67
210
18
4
6
9
9
32
0
1-0

Dotzauer

RECEIVI

IOWA
RUSHING

MOORE INJURED

Caldwell
Sims
Barris
Holmes
Rollins
Jensen
Nelson
Mix

Att.
12
5
9
4
1
9
No.
:1
a
2

Yds.
32
25
2
11
11
15
14

Irih

sweep

1-14 1-0 Caldwell
5-65 9-85

PASSING
Att
23
RECEIVING

Franklin
Heater
Haslerig
Thornbladh
Banks

Att.
6
12
21
8
PASSING
Att. Cmp.
11 6
1 0

Yds.
37
63
28
98
24
Yds.
107
0

Wellington
Paulson
Mix
liar: is

PUNTING
No. Yds.
Sunderman 9 283
SCORE BY QUARTERS
1 2 3 4
IOWA 0 0 HI0
MICHIGAN 10 7 14 0

Franklin
Cipa

By JOEL GREER span of 2:51 to take a command-
Yds, Special To The Daily ing 6-3 lead.
93 SOUTH BEND-Roy Bolles sure
did not pick a very good time to But Bolles' stagefright eventual-'
Yds. make his first appearance ever in ly disappeared and the proud Wol-
28 a WCHA game. The sophomore verines came back within one be-
20
34 Michigan netminder replaced the fore a senseless penalty helped the
11 injured R o b b i e Moore midway Irish put the game out of reach.
through the second period of last Gary Connelly was called for the
Ave. night's 8-5 Notre Dame victory. "too-many-men-on-the-ice" infrac-
With the score tied 3-3, the tion when he eagerly jumped over
F Fighting Irish immediately greet- the boards when his teammates
0 ed Bolles with three goals in a were scuffling in front of the Mich-
igan net. The officials said that
Connelly came on the ice before the
whistle, but Connelly was the first
to disagree in the Michigan dress-
ing room after the game.
"It came after the whistle blew,"
Connelly argued. But if it did, Con-
nelly would have gotten a five
minute penalty for joining a fight;I
so he willingly -agreed with the
referee.
"That's what blew the game,"
said a dejected Connelly as barelyf
ten seconds after the penalty,
Eddie Bumbacco's power play goal
gave him three for the night and
gave the Irish a sweep of the two
game series.
Tr ich a nnrh "Taffy" ouith i aidu

weeken
But it was more of the fact that
Michigan was much more aggres-
sive and Smith agreed, "that may
be why we weren't as sharp."
Michigan coach Al Renfrew, al-I
though disappointed with the de-
feat, commented, "We played good
enough to win." But Renfrew was'
even more disturbed at the many
injuries Michigan suffered in the
series.
In the second period, Bob Fal-
coner took a stick in the mouth.
With blood still pouring from his
lower lip, Falconer said, "I got 19
stitches and lost two teeth." De-
spite the injury, Falconer came
back onto the ice for the third
period.
Paul Paris, who s ffered a badly,
bruised shoulder in Friday night's
game, did not even dress for last
night's game.
Randy Neal, who watched the
first two periods from the press-
box, hurriedly dressed during in-
termission and played sparingly in
the third period.
It was the Irish line of Paul

In addition to Bumbacco's hat
trick, Regan also scored three
times and Williams got three
'assists.
In an attempt to bolster the de-
fense, Renfrew m o v e d Michel
Jarry back to the blueline and
sent Tom Lindskog into Jarry's
vacated forward position. The
move paid off offensively, as
Jarry's booming shot from the
blueline netted him the three goal
!hat trick.
For the second straight night,
Gary Kardos opened the scoring.
Lindskog adapted to his new posi-
tion well. Forechecking deep in the
Irish zone, Lindskog stole the puck
from Irish defenseman Bill Nyrop
and set up Jarry at the point.
Jarry's high hard drive was de-
flected by Kardos past Irish net-
minder Chris Cathcart at 2.56 o,
the opening period.
Bimbacco's first goal came de-
spite some tenacious backchecking
by Lindskog. Completely wrapped
up, B"mbacco managed to get a
shot past Moore from a bad angle.
Jarry put Michigan back in front
early in the second period with Pat
Conroy in the penalty box for Notre
Dame. Jarry, whose shot was
amazingly accurate last night, pick-
ed the upper lefthand corner with
a blazer from the blueline.
Regan got his first of three at
6:44 of the second period on a play
that embarrassed little Robbie.
With Moore clinging to the right
goalnost, Regan circled behind the
net to slide the puck just inside the
left goalpost.
After the two teams traded goals,
Gary Kardos collided with Moore
in the Michigan goal crease and
Moore had to be helped from the
ice. To the fans delight, Roy Bolles
was forced to take over and then
the onslaught began.

id

set

irisn coacnh'Lety" Smithsaa
the victories were, "Very nice, but Regan, Ian Williams, and Bum-
we're much too inconsistent." bacco that did the damage again.
(Bomb accoed

FIRST PERIOD
SCORING: 1. M-Kardos (Jarry, Sara-
zin) 2:56; 2. ND-Bumbacco (Green)
16:57.
PENALTIES: 1. M-Moore (slashing)
3:51; 2. M-Connelly (interference)
4:25; 3. ND-Delorenzi (charging) 8:13;
4. M-Fox (high sticking) 12:28; 5.j
ND-Conroy (tripping) 19:26.
SECOND PERIOD
SCORING: 3. M-Jarry (Fox Malette)
:42; 4. ND-Regan (Williams) 6:44; 5.,
ND--Schafer (Mason) 9:03; 6. M-Sar-{
azin (unassisted) 10:45; 7. ND-Bum-{
bacco (Williams, Nyrop) 12:55; 8. ND-
DeLorenzi (Conroy, Green) 14:29; 9.
ND-Regan (Bumbacco) 15:36; 10. M-
Jarry (Fox, Malette) 17:19.
PENALTIES: 6. M. Werner (hooking)
6:05; 7. ND-Curry (carrying a broken,
o)sU

stick) 6:25; 8. M-Fox (tripping) 11:21;
9. ND-Curry (interference) 16:30.
THIRD PERIOD
SCORING: 11. M-Jarry (Malette,
Connelly) 6:10; 12. ND-Regan (Bum-
bacco, Williams) 14:09; 13. ND-Bum-
bacco (unassisted) 17:45.
PENALTIES: 10. ND-Curry (rough-
ing) :15; 11. M-Werner (roughing) :15;
12. ND-Delorenzi (high sticking) 2:16;
13. M-Kardos (holding) 10:14; 14. ND-
Nyrop (hooking) 10:30; 15. M-Connelly
(too many men on the ice) 13:29; 16.
M-Connelly (elbowing) 15:31; 17. ND-
Curry (holding) 16:36.
SAVES
Moore (M) 10 6 0-16
Bolles (M) 0 5 11-16
Cathcart (ND) 6 8 13-27

AP Photo
WOLVERINE WINGBACK CLINT HASLERIG (43) appears to be in trouble, but so what? Clint only
ran for three yards on this play, but his Michigan teammates combined for 352 others as the Blue ex-
tended its winning streak to nine games.

Spar tans

bash

Michigan 31, Iowa 0
Michigan St. 19, Ohio State 12
Minnesota 35, Northwestern 29
Illinois 37, Indiana 20
Purdue 37, Indiana 6
Alabama 35, LSU 21
Georgia 10, Florida 7
Kentucky 14, Vanderbilt 13
Florida St. 23, Tulsa 21
Arizona 21, Brigham Young 7
Nebraska 23, Iowa St. 23, tie
Oklahoma 17, Missouri 6
WakeForest 10, Duke 7
Oregon St. 26, California 23
Washington 38, UCLA 21
Navy 28, Pitt 13
Notre fDame 21. Air Force 7

SOUTHWEST
Rice 23, Arkansas 20
Texas 17, Baylor 3
Texas A&M 27, SMU 17
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 60, New Mexico 7
Colorado 33, Kansas 8
washington St. 27, Stanford 13
NBA
Golden State 103, New York 102
Boston 121, Detroit 118
Chicago 111, Baltimore 106
Atlanta 111. Milwaukee 102
Philadelphia 114, Houston 112
ABA
Kentucky 116, New York 95
Carolina 130, Virginia 128

I
i
t(4
t
i
I

By MARC FELDMAN
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING - After his Michigan
State Spartans upset Purdue last Saturday
and knocked the Boilermakers out of the
Big Ten lead, Duffy Daugherty quipped
that "maybe I ought to quit every week".
Yesterday Duffy didn't quit again but his
Spartans had enough adrenalin to soundly
thrash Ohio State, 19-12.
DUFFY MIGHT be regretting his deci-
sion now as his Spartans have certainly put
the "fun" back into football the past two
Saturdays with big wins. Daugherty bub-
bled with praise for both his offense and
defense and said that "in all my years, I've
never seen a team play with greater de-
sire".
Besides the Irishman's four leaf clovers,
the Spartans had Duffy's "special Dutch
treat", Dirk Krijt, who booted four field
goals in the first half to the delight and
astonishment of the sellout crowd of 76,264.

THE DUTCHMAN'S toe was by no means
the most effective weapon in the Spartan
arsenal. Daugherty sent a fleet of quick
backs at the Buckeye line and they com-
bined for 334 rushing yards, with much of
yardage on quick openers up the middle
and straight power plays.
Michigan State had nine individual runs
over ten yards each with lightning-quick
Mike Holt running for 93 yards in 15 car-
ries, David E. Brown, 71 yards, and Ar-
nold Morgado, 57. The Spartans dominated
all the statistics with 81 offensive plays to
57 for the Buckeyes and a 366-176 advantage
in total offense.
Despite these impressive stats compiled
agaivist it, the Buckeye defense, led by line-
backer Randy Gradishar, was extremely
tough when its goal line was in danger of
violation. Eightgtimes Michigan State
marched inside the OSU thirty, but the
Spartans could manage just one touch-
down.

a touchdown that would have given it an
11 point lead.
Ironically the Spartans' lone touchdown
that decided the game was handed them
via the fumble route. Buckeye Elmer Lip-
pert fumbled on the OSU seven and two
plays later, quarterback Mark Neisen
scrambled over.
WOODY HAYES, . whose Buckeyes now
share second place with Purdue in the Big
Ten, issued a terse 14-second statement to
the press after the game. Sullenly, Hayes
admitted "We couldn't do anything in the
second half - we took a real beating out
there from a good team."
Indeed Ohio State was held to 46 yards
in the second half by the stout MSU de-
fense which was anchored all afternoon by
Gail Clark, Brian McConnell, and Chris
King.
Late in the third quarter, the Bucks
showed about their only offense of the half
when Greg Hare completed three straight

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