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November 11, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November 11, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Humble Pie Lp 's
hit USA shores

Humble Pie

6:00 2 4rNews
9 Wrestling
50 Star Trek
56 Thirty Minutes With
6:30 2 4 News
56 Just Generation
7:00 2 Truth or Sonsequences
4 Explorers
7 Michigan Outdoors
9 This is Your Life
50 Hee Haw
56 Family Game
7:30_2 Young Dr. Kildare
4 Adventurer
7 Town Meeting
9 Beachcombers
56 Playhouse New York
8:00 All in the Family
4 Emergency!
7 Kung Fu
9 Pro Hockey
8:30 2 Bridget Lovs Ber!
9:00 2 Mary Tyler Moore
4 Movie
"Giant"
7 Streets of San Franclsc
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by'
carrier (campus 'area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign),
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

56 On Location
9:302 Bob Newhart
10:00 2 Mission: Impossible
56 Hollywood Television Theatre
7 Sixth Sense
10:30 8 Document
11:00 2 79 News
11:15 4 News
9 A Look Back-News
11:30 2 Movie
"None But the Brave." (1965)
7 Movie
"Joe" (1970)
9 Movie
"Boom!" (1968)
50 Movie-Science Fiction
, "Queen of Outer Space." (1958)
11:45 4 Johnny Carson
1:00 50 The Baron
1:15 4 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Private Eyes." (1953)
7 Movie
"The Fearmakers." (1958)
3:00 2 7 News
.wcbn today
fm 89.5

By HARRY HAMMITT
Towards the end of 1968 and
the beginning of 1969 there were
strong and- sudden changes on
the British music scene. Success-
ful groups were breaking up and
new combinations of successful
performers were beginning to
take shape. The era of the super-
group was born.
Most famous of these super-
groups was Blind Faith who were
immeidately successful because
all the members were already
well-known. But supergroups lead
to personality clashes and Blind
Faith broke up after a short life.
Oddly enough, when the sup-
ergroup era is referred to, writ-
ers often mention anotheraEn-
glish band besides Blind Faith.
The band, Humble Pie, certainly
didn't make an immediate im-
pression in America and it has
only been lately, after they've
been around three to four years,
that they have firmly establish-
ed themselves in the United
States.
It is questionable whether
Humble Pie could ever be refer-
red to as a supergroup; they.
pale in terms of already estab-
lished success in comparison
with Blind Faith. They gained
most of their notoriety from the
British music press.
The bands that Humble Pie
came from were well-established
in England, but not greatly pop-
ular in the United States. Prob-
ably the best known of the
groups was Spooky Tooth which
yielded up bassist Greg Ridley.
The two main members of the
band, Peter Frampton, guitar,
vocals, and Steve Marriott, gui-
tar, vocals, keyboards, and har-
monica,both came from promi-
nent but small British bands.
Frampton came from the Herd,
and Marriott, who may well be
the most familiar member of the
band to American audiences,
came from the Small Faces,
who have now found vast popu-
larity with some new members.
Drummer Jerry Shirley hadn't
played in any bands of note.
The band wanted to work their
way up slowly, and since they
didn't live up to their type, they
floundered from the beginning.
As Marriott says, they have
spent most of their time until
now living down their original
supergroup image. The band
was so unknown in the United
States that their first records
weren't released here except in
limited quantities.
Now that they have a decent
U.S. distribution, their first two
albums have been released in
the United States.
The albums are together in
one package called "Lost and
Found" (A&M SP 3513).tThe in-
dividual ntmes of the two re-
cords are As Safe As Yesterday
Is and Town and Country.
Upon hearing these two re-
cords it is amazing that Humble
Pie didn't make a big splash im-
mediately because the two re-

cords are uniformily excellent.
It must be remembered that
these records were released in
1969 so nothing new can right-
fully be expected, but it is as-
tounding how fresh the material
is on this album.
The band does perhaps half of
their numbers with acoustic
guitars and the other half with
electric guitars. The material ,is
generally blues - folk related,
mostly original with a very fine
choice of unoriginal material,
and one straight cop of Chuck
Berry's "Little Queenie." There's
nothing that's really new by to-
day's stndards, but the music is
ahead of its time.
The musicians have been ser-
iously underrated because their
playing exhibits a great sense
of feeling and timing, and is ab-
solutely flawless. The strongest
interplay is between Frampton
and Marriott who are continuous-

ly inspired to new heig'
tuosity by their interac
show themselves as ur
ing guitarists, both ac
electric, and Marriot
that he is a powerful fi
reckoned with on keybi
harmonica.
Frampton and Mario
two main vocalists, wi
taking the lead on ones
have good voices wv
very close to Steve
yet neither have quite1
or depth of Winwood. N
probably the stronger,
exciting of the two. Th
section is good; Shirl
across well with a cris
tive style.
Humble Pie is still
away in their attempt
the top. In some way
bad that these two
weren't available unti
cently because they w(
firmly established Hu
from the beginning as
rate band it is. These
show outstanding talen
composition and mus
music played with fe
without pretense, and
the auspicious beginni
fine British band.

[t Ridey11 By BILL HEENAN
ith Ridley Barbour Gym is in chaos-
song. Both bodies falling gracefully left and
'hich areggrcflyetan
Winwood, right! Is this modern dance "or-
the power ganized insanity?" Prof. Edith
arriott is Embree, director of Just Moving
and more Company, rubs her hands togeth-
e rhythm er, expecting to have the entire
ey comes 'U' dancing any day now.
p authori- Just Moving Company mem-
bers include dance majors, peo-
plugging ple from other schools, and even
to reach some talented non-physical edu-
s it's too cation students from the Septem-
albums ber auditions. The Company was
l just re- created last Spring.
ould have Embree feels that Just Moving
mble Pie and other associated organiza-
the first- tions serve the 'U' by "filling
releases the student's cultural gap. Young
it in both people should realize the ob-
sicianship, vious advantages of m o d e r n
eling but dance-physical fitness and in-
document volvement with people . . . really
ings of a getting into life." Modern dance
uses the body in as many pos-
sible ways to express emotions,
mood, or the theme of a musi-
cal; movement is brought to
"the least common denominator
to bring out the essence of the
idea in mind."
During the Company's Mon-
day and Wednesday evening ses-
sions in Barbour Gym, 16
to grasp choreographers break the 60-odd
American dancers down into smaller groups
- even to practice various aspects of
s. Look at modern dance including choreog-
ergate af- raphy of various works.
nd order" One of these is the Company's
s hands in yearly performance American in
e America Paris scheduled to be performed
. Nixon's at the Power Center on Feb. 17.
ever been This performance in conjunction
with the Detroit Philharmonic

An evening witl
Richard Nixon

hts of vir-
tion. Both
nderstand-
oustic and
tt proves
t rce to be
Foards and

By HERB BOWIE
Gore Vidal's An Evening with
Richard Nixon is such an unam-
bitious play that I can't help
wondering why he wrote it. Un-
like most records dealing with
politics, the recently released
soundtrack of Vidal's play is not
very funny. Except for a few pa-
thetic attempts at humor ("In
his quest for reelection Richard
Nixon is quite capable of mail-
ing the White House brick-by-
brick to Albania"), it doesn't
even trydto be funny.
Nor does the play have any
other redeeming aesthetic val-
ues. Vidal's role of author con-
sisted mainly of research, n o t
creation. The backbone of the
play is a series of selected state-
ments that Nixon has actualy
made. The character Nixon
speaks the lines, with the ghosts
of former Presidents Washing-
ton, Eisenhower, and Kennedy
making comments that are rare-
ly witty and almost never en-
lightening. The result barely de-
serves to be called a play, much
les drama.
Although Vidal's work is an
aesthetic disaster, it does make
a point: Nixon's sole firm poli-
tical conviction down through
the years has been his abiding
belief that he deserves reelec-
tion.
The question is: so what? What

Vidal apparently fails
is that nearly every
already realizes this
many Nixon supporters
the reaction to the Wat
fair: Nixon's "law an
camp is caught with its
the code jar and Middle
hardly blinks its eyes
political vacuity has n
in doubt.

Just Moving.. .
towards dance

Orchestra has been shown in
September for D e t r o i t area
schools, and at that time was
"greatly acclaimed."
A typical evening at Barbour
begins with the dancers warming
up like athletes. Next the group
practices American in Paris. The
broken up groups, covering the
floor with their intricate move-
ments, practice African and ab-
stract dance as well as the Emo-
tion, Words, and Sound-Motion
components of modern dance.
Often o u t s i d e lecturers are
present.
"Young people should realize the
obvious advantages of modern
dance - physical fitness and
involvement with people."
-Edith Embree
Just Moving is concerned with
human beings, and the Company
has toured correctional institu-
tions in the past. In addition, lec-
ture demonstrations have been
performed for area musical so-
cieties and public schools.
Prof. Embree's Company meets
in Barbour Gym Monday and
Wednesday nights 7:00-10:00. For
anyone just starting in the field,
there are introductory teaching
sessions on Saturday 12:00-5:00
at Barbour Gym. Yoga, Modern
Dance, African, Jazz, Flamingo
are presented.

CHRISTMAS in
HAWAII
DEC. 17-DEC. 24
" Jet round trip Det
" First-class hotels at Waikiki
Beach, Maui, and Hawaii
We Sightseeing and transfers
Nat'l Bank of Ypsilanti
TRAVEL BUREAU
611 W. Cross, Ypsi 483-8556
CinemaGuild
FESTIVAL OF FILMS
ON WOMEN
SATURDAY
THE SILENCE
Dir. Ingmar Bergman, 1964.
Two sisters and a small boy
struggle with an alien environ-
ment and internal frustration.
Sexuality in various forms as an
attempt to escape: promiscuity,
masturbation, incest, lesbian-
ism and reproduction.
SUNDAY
A
ADAM'S RIB
Cukor
with Spencer Tracy
and Katherine Hepburn
MONDAY
THE PUMPKIN
EATER
with Anne Bancroft
Architecture Auditorium
7 & 9 pm 75c
$2.00 a

If you'd like to enjoy an eve-
ning with President Nixon, you'd
better wait till he appearsmon
TV again - the show'll be more
enlightening and much more en-
tertaining than Vidal's play.
(WABX Airwaves) - At a Bea-
ver Falls, Pennsylvania, rock
concert recently, 6,000 fans were
stunned when a hearse with a
police escort pulled into the con-
cert area and unloaded a casket
on the stage. An unidentified man
stood up and began to eulogize
a lately-deceased person named
"Bob", who died of an overdose
of drugs. In the middle of the
eulogy, the casket slowly creak-
ed open and "Bob" climbed out,
gave a speech about how he found
a new life after he kicked drugs,
and then walked off the stage.
The concert, casket, speeches
and miracle, it turned out, were
sponsored by the Beaver Falls
Police Department.

-TONIGHT-

9:00
11:00
12 :00
2:00
5:00
7:00
11:00

2th Centurysmusic
Religious music
Broadway
Jazz
Black edition
Rrythm & Blues
Progressive rock (runs until 3)

Hav a flair for
artistic writinbg?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music.
or writing feature
stories ab a the
arts: Contact ArtF
Editor, c/o The
drama, dance, film,
Michigan Daily.

I _ __ __.____

DANCING E
8 P.M.-2 A.M. EVERY NIGHT

I

Arthur Penn's Faye Dunaway, Warren Beatty
BONNIE & CLYDE
"They're young, and in love
and they kill people

7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
SI'
PETER FONDA'S

$1 cont.

DE-BY-SIDE

C/wiuck Zk4r,4Aift £enice4-

THE HIRED HAND
"not only a film, it's a poem!"-NBC TV
MODERN LANGUAGES

DRAFT BEER and

PIZZA

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
OF CHRIST CHURCH, 306 N. Division
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 8:00 a.m.: Holy Eucharist.

FROM 5:00 P.M.
341 South Main * Ann Arbor 769-5960

Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr.; R. E. 10:00 a.m.: Holy Eucharist and
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m.: Worship Simonson. Sermon.
Services, Sunday School (2-20 yrs.). 9 a.m.: Morning Prayer.
Infants' room available Sunday and 10 a.m.: Worship Service and FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Wednesday. Church School. 1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Li- * * * Services of Worship at 9:00 and
berty St.: Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10:30 a.m. - Theme: "Day by
10=5; Closed Sundays and Holi- FIRST UNITED METHODIST D1:ay.mLe - Teme:r "DayFllby
days. CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA- Da."Ledbyy SeniordHi Fellow
For transportation, call 668-6427. TION - State at Huron and Wash.shp
* * * 9:30 a.m.-Epworth Choir. COLLEGE PROGRAM
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Mr. Fred Bible Study - Sundays at 10:30
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST B. Maitland: "A Temporary Loss a.m.; Tuesdays-12:00 to 1:00;
2380 Packard Road, 971-0773 of Faith." Holy Communion - Wednesdays
Tom Bloxam, Pastor, 971-3152 WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS: 5:15 to 5:45.
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 12: HOUSE
Worship: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. No prgram because of Retreat. "Black Odyssey" Exhibit - 9
Training Hour: 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16.Clack O dyssey"
+ * * 6:00 p.m.-Grad Community, call a.m. to 9 pm-
668-6881 for information.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST Friday, Nov. 17: UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH: 3150 Glacier Way 7:30 p.m. - Young Marrieds _ CHAPEL (LCMS)
Pastor: Charles Johnson Hayride with Couples Club. Reser- 1 1511 Washtenaw Avenue
For information, transportationIvations needed by Monday! Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
For foratio, tansprtaion,. *Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m-
personalized help, etc., phone 769- Saturday, Nov. 18: Worship Services
6299 or 761-6749. uGOBLUE!ndWrsiaSr is
" 1 Sndav t 9:1 a~m-Bible Studv

Auditoriums 3 & 4

-Newsreel

UAC-DAYSTAR presents

JAMES
TAYLOR
with SECTION
Danny Kortchmar-Russ Kunkle
Craig Doerge--Lelard Sklar

NOVEMBER 17
FRIDAY 8 P.M.
$3.50 $4.50 $5.50
crisler arena
MANY GOOD SEATS
BUT GOING FAST
Reserve your seats
today at Michigan
Union. (You'll re-
ceive a receipt-cou-
pon which you ex-

ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
"BEST FOREIGN FILM"
"Reaches the r
artistic and human
heights of
'Bicycle Thief'!."
--N.Y. Post
"The hand of
genius is once
again evident."
-Judith Crist,
New York Magazine
VITTORIO DE SICA'S
the Garden of the Finzi-Continis
Starring Dominique Sanda, Lino Capolicchio, Helmut Berger,
Produced by Arthur Cohn and Gianni Hecht Lucari, in color, rj
PLUS
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST"
'%4-N.Y. Times, -N.Y. Mag.
-Cue, -N.Y. Post,
--Sat. Review, -Nat. Observer
-WNEW-TV
"IT WILL MAKE YOU
REALIZE HOW SMALL
AND SAFE AND
ORDINARY MOST
MOVIES ARE."
-Canby, N.Y. Times

* * 4

* * *

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
On the Campus at the corner of
State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Sr. Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron St., Phone 663-9376

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC, LCA) (formerly
Lutheran Student Chapel)
801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St.)
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday Worship-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper-6:15 p.m.
Program-7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Eucharist-5:15 p.m.

Wednesday at 10 p.m.-Midweek
Worship.
* * *4
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Don Postema, Minister
Morning Worship Service-10:00
a.m.
Coffee Hour-11:00 a.m.
Evening Service-6:00 p.m.

The School of Music presents two one-act operas
Puccini's SISTER ANGELICA
Ibert's ANGELIQUEF

change for a ticket
x ' k°' y< when t h e y arrive
Tues., Nov. 14.)
The Allman Bros.

i

to Ki7E

''"" i

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