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November 09, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-09

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 9, 1972

7

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 9, 1972

i,:"t" .} ;} q . t:5...:: F;} .*T{.:M.4v.*.Wfl }. .'..'"S":1':y+'1. ,. :4'p ;:};5::, y. °$

Returns by states
Results as of noon, yesterday

Congress remains in
hands of Democrats

STATE
Ala
Alaska
Ariz
Ark
Calif
Colo
Conn
Del
DC
Fla
Geo
Haw
Ida
Ill
Ind
Iowa
Kann
Ky
La
Maine
Mar
Mass
Mich
Minn
Miss
Mo
Mont
Nebr
Nev
N. Hamp
N Jer
N Mex
N York
N Car
N Dak
Ohio
Okla
Ore
Penn
R I
So Car
So Dak
Tenn
Tex
Utah
Vt
Vir
Wash
W Va
Wis
Wyo

% Report. NIXON-%

87
72
94
88
981
95
95
100
100.
100
81
100
92
94
99
99
94
100
89
98
100
99
86
95
95
98
94
99
87
98
95
97
98
98
82
96
98
99
100
100
95
95
100
86
98
97
99
90
92
100
99
TOTAL

661,525
41,809
370,220
395,640
4,427,324
559,709
762,769
139,796
29,697
1,751,010
687,516
167,414
179,069
2,613,162
1,387,877
703,496
562,358
670,239
679,944
248,463
797,295
1,090,143
1,676,968
819,678
477,661
1,082,757
165,967
382,327
103,874
210,218
1,715,259
229,606
4,247,487
1,043,162
145,072
2,353,516
731,451
479,282
2,693,451
208,725
468,036
146,605
811,749
1,893,818
312,586
112,428
979,928
654,867
440,826
985,871
100,126
44,599,976

76
59
65
69
55
63
60.
60
21
72
75
63
64
60
67
58
69
64
66
61
62
45
56
52
79
63
58
70
64
65
63
62
60
70
62
60
74
53.
60
53
71
54
68
67.
68
64
69
57
64
54
70
61

McGOVERN-%
205,343 23
24,362 34
182,777 32
178,822 31
3,438,718 43
315,507 35
506,565 39
91,907 39
109,974 79
690,565 28
234,938 25
100,617 37
74,020 27
1,794,765 4
702,987 33
491,905 40
243,526 29
367,561 35
305,836 30
159,080 39
486,570 37
1,303,783 55
1,276,118 43
741,116 47
122,050 20
660,884 37
109,549 33
164,860 31
59,951 36
114,465 34
1,1,1 37
137,495 35
2,878,013 40
427,981 29
85,215 37
1,519,628 3
237,512 24
387,210 42
1,784,555 39
185,125 47
184,958 23
128,549 46
355,906 30
968,348 33
121,426 2:
64,933 30
436,468 30
459,413 39
255,998 36
808,216 44
44,203 30
27,752,389 8

(Continued from Page 1)
party rode to victory at the Miam
convention.
The first battle of the war w:
come a month from today whe
the Democratic National Commi
tee meets in Washington. Par
regulars headed by Sen. Henr
Jackson (D-Wash) are expectedt
launch a drive to remove McGo
ern appointee Jean Westwooda
chairperson of the party.
Despite theirtpresent disarra
the Democrats are stronger tha
ever mon Capitol Hill, thanksth
three upsets over senior Repub
can senators.
Margaret Chase Smith-Maine'
senator since 1948-lost to Williai
Hathaway, and Gordon Allott(
Colorado-the Senate's third ran
ing Republican-lost to Floyd Ha
kell, a former Republican wI
broke with the GOP over Nixon
war policy.
Republican Sen. Jack Miller
Local votes
'differ fromin
state trends
(Continued from Page 1)
Even one local Republican h
to admit the Democrats had ben
fitted greatly from the stude
vote.
"They got the youth on the
side," he conceded." It was afta
tastic power-play on their part
Student turnouts were extren
ly high Tuesday, in sharp contra
to the claims made by mostp
litical analysts who said studen
would not turn-out in large nu

Iowa was defeated by Democrat
ni Dick Clark.
The Senate's youth movement
ill was given a strong boost when
en Republican Senator Caleb Boggs of
t- Delaware lost to Democrat Joseph
t:yBdn Biden is 29 and will reach
y 30-the Senate's minimum age-by
y the end of the month.
to The Congressional Black Caucus
a- also gained clout as at least 12
of 13 incumbents and three new-
y, comers swept to victory.
an Most significant was the victory
to of Andrew Young in Georgia's 5th
li.. District.
Young-a former aide to the late
Dr. Martin Luther King-is the first
m black elected to the House from the
of Deep South since 1901.
k- In gubernatorial r a c e s GOP
Is- gains in Missouri and North Caro-
ho lina were offset by Democratic vic-
's tories in Delaware and Vermont
and the Democrats' 30-20 lead in
of governorships remained intact.

.I
**
NOW ON AT
ary cDibble
ANN ARBOR
1121 South University
COMMUNISTS, CONCENTRATION CAMPS,
AND THE MEMORY OF A PEOPLE:
THE JEWS IN EASTERN EUROPE TODAY
LECTURE BY
Dr. Cynthia Haft
Asst. Prof. of French, NYU
Interviewer for Oral History Project, Center for
Holocaust Studies, Hebrew Unive.rsity
Extensive travel to.
concentration camp sites in Eastern Europe
FRIDAY, Nov. 10,8 p.m. at HILLEL,1429 Hill

0

Y

VI

iii mm5i5U

Ready A nerica?
Sen. Edward Brooke (R-Mass.) who won re-election Tuesday said
he is contemplating running for President in 1976. He conceded,
however, that Vice-President Spiro Agnew currently held the inside
track.
FIGHTS EXTRADITION:
Fugitive gls es
to find happiness

po-
mts
xm-

SUBSCRIBE NOW
&~ tiFtyn ailg
Call 764-0558

bers.
While Democrats did not fare
well nationally, they are optimis-
tic about the future. In the win-
dow of their local campaign head-
quarters yesterday they had a
sign reading:
"Be vigilant and brave
after night's darkness comes the
dawn
and, after the battle is lost
the war still goes on."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
:r.C.:.;ni".; r.%" s:}4:,<Yis?;'.":i i ?'. ti :::i:.+::" s $ '.S%:"' :'.'"n':"S+''t 'lflt ..S is

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of M egaa. Nts ces iouM be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before,2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9 !
DAY CALENDAR
Combined Resources for Nducative
Electronics: "CREE II, New Develop-
ments in Television," U-M TV Ctr.,
1:30 pm.
Library Film Series: James Baldwin's
Harlem, commentary by C. Gibson,
UGLI Multipurpose Rm., 3:30 pm.
MHRI Psychiatry Lecture: L. Uhr,I
Univ. of Wisconsin, "Understanding
Robots," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
Religious Affairs Lecture: A. Faith,
astrologer, palmist & tarot reader, "The
Awakened Archetype in Psychic Phe-
nomena," Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4 pm.
Urban Planning Lecture: Mel Ravitz,
pres. of Detroit Common Council, "The
Politics of the City," Rackham Assem-
bly Hall, 4 pm.

Near East. Lang. & Lit.-Ctr. for N.
East. & N. African Studies Lecture:
R. Dirnemann, curator of hist., Mil-
waukee Public Museum, "Syria: TheI
Land Between - Mostly Unknown,".
200 Lane Hall, 4 pm.
Nuclear Colloquium: R. Lewis, "Ex-
periments in Parity Nonconservation,"
P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Student Lab Theatre: Stein's "Three!
Sisters Who Are Not Sisters," Rich-
ardson's "Gallows Humor II," Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 pm.
International Night: Chinese food,
League cafeteria, 5n pm.
School of Music: String Dept. Recital,
SM Recital Hall, 8 pm.
International Social Hour: Rive
Gauche, 1024 Hill St., 9 -pm.
GENERAL NOTICES
Attention Women: Notice of Alum-
nae Council Scholarships for 1973-74;
applications for following scholarshipsi
& fellowships for women available in
office ofsAlumnae Activities, Mich. Un-
ion; must be returned by Jan. 22, 1973;,
Alumnae Club Scholarships, MaryE
Louise Hinsdale, Laurel H. Seeley, Ber-
tha Welker, and Vieta v. Woodlock
Scholarships; Lucy E. Elliott, Alice
Crocker Lloyd and Lucile B. Conger
Fellowships.

(Continued from Page 1)
her for hours, Sandy says. "He
told me. all about his jail rec-
ord even before he came to my
house. He was really afraid of
not being accepted-like some
sort of freak."
Jim never got to Colorado.
Instead, the couple stayed to-
;ether, eventually moving to
Ann Arbor in June.
Jim's past finally caught up
with him one night in October
when he and a neighbor, Dan
Blackmun, were out buying
some Coke for Sandy.
Their car was stopped for a
missing headlight- a relatively
minor offense, but one which
requires a check for any pos-
sible criminal record.
"It was anti-climatic," Black-
mun recalls. "You expect the
capture of an escapee to be a
running gun battle. It seemed
very trivial at the time."
The following morning Sandy
found an attorney, Jonathan
Rose, and together with their
friends and employers, posted
Jim's bond.
The present truce, however,
is only temporary. December
8, a court hearing will deter-
mine whether Jim will be sent
back to Massachusetts.
Meanwhile, Jim and Sandy

Jim works as a painter with
the A-1 Painting Company, while
Sandy takes in sewing.
Although they are now living
with their lawyer after sharing
a room with a friend of Sandy's,
they hope to find a room or
apartment of their own soon.
"A person like Jim couldn't
;i on the way he was living,"
Sandy says. "He wants it all
settled to the end so we can
live a normal life."
And so the couple waits for
the court to decide their fate.
"There's one thing Jim al-
ways said which I hope isn't
true," Sandy says. "He always
said, 'I guess I'm not supposed
to lead a normal life because I
goofed up as a child'."

ti
I

- - - -- -

E I

A

BOWLING
TABLE TENNIS
BILLIARDS
FOOSBA LL
NION

r

havce calmly resumed
lives whilh awaiting the
sion.

their
deci-

The First People's History of the U.S. ...

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