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September 07, 1972 - Image 73

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 7, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.F'Gge Sd6ven

~Thursday, September 7, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

"In addition to fresh fruits
and vegetables and
plants, home-baked goods
and non mass-produced
handicrafts are offered
for sale. On any given day,
there will be fudge, cookies,
assorted cakes, home-made
bread, jewelry, needlework,
pottery and sometimes
pet animals, too."
By ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
Stroll down Fourth St. past
the corner of Detroit St. any
Wednesday or Saturday morn-
ing, and you'll come upon' an
impressive array of seasonal
agriculture goodies at the city's
open air Farmer's Market.
According to city law, only
items produced locally may be
sold at the Farmer's Market.
The available offerings, thus
may vary considerably from
visit to visit, with apples and
squash predominating in t h e
fall and strawberries and flow-
ers in the summer.

farmers, artisans
sell their wares

In addition to fresh fruit and
vegetables and plants, h o m e
baked goods and non mass-pro-
duced handicrafts are offered
for sale. On any given day, there
will be fudge, cookies, assort-
ed cakes; home-made break, jew-
elry, needlework, pottery and
sometimes pet animals too.
Because many of the stalls are
rented by- small farmers, and
business is brisk, it is import-
ant to arrive early to purchase
the best merchandise. But even
if you happen by in the middle
of the afternoon, chances a r e
the'e will still be something -
if just impromptu music or plea-
sant persons - to strike your
fancy.
All sorts of people gather at
the Farmer's Market to reap
the harvest which nearby farm-
ers have gathered, to glean from

the culinary artwork of aging
local bakers, to cull the crops
of our artisans.
Young women parade w i t h
their even younger offspring,
bearded students wander f r o m
stall to stall, elderly persons
amble through the walkways, an
occasional dog may b a r k
though, but never, never, is the
market place quiet or lacking
life.
From blocks in the distance
the trail of scents; pursues the
nostrils: the smell of baked
goods, the perfume - pretty
scents of the myriad flowers,
the hearty aroma of the baked
goods, and closer up, the sticky-
sweet smell of ripe fruits.
Each stall has its specialties
and its distinctive marks. An
earth-hardened farmer, hands
gnarled from sunbaked labor,

offers potatoes, cucumbers,
squash. A delicate woman of-
fers chocolate chip, molasses
or sugar cookies, chocolate fudge
and popcorn balls. An awkward
teenager peddles tomatoes, flow-
ers, apples from the f a m i ly
acres. The egg lady sells eggs.
How else to describe her?
When you finish sifting bar-
gains and brightening your day
at the Farmer's Market, you
might wander next door to Ker-
rytown, an arcade of special-
ty grocery shops.
The prices at Kerrytown are
somewhat higher than at t h e
municipal Farmer's Market, but
the interesting amalgam of per-
sons and products there serves
as partial compensation.
The outlets include a strudel
shop, a fudge shop, a natural
foods shop, a fish market, pro-
duce stand, oriental foods store,
a wine and cheese shop, a but-
cher shop and a delicatessen.
Each of the shops opens on the
central concourse, and the em-
ployes - often the shop owners
themselves - encourage casual
browsing.
Kerrytown is oPen during con-
ventional business hours. The
Farmer's Market opens every
Wednesday and Saturday from
8 to 3, and sometimes on Mon-
day afternoons as well.

<"

moving toward
a cleaner city

By GENE ROBINSON
Supplement Co-Editor
The site of the first environ-
mental teach-in, Ann Arbor has
traditionally been active in the
ecology movement. With the
inception of several new envi-
ronmental programs and re-
forms, last year witnessed the
continuation of this concern for .
the '%environment
The local chapter of Environ-
mental Action for Survival (EN-
ACT) began a campaign last
February to recycle glass con-
tainers from campus. The group
received $200 in University
funding.
Utilizing two trucks. loaned by
the natural resources school
and a number of barrels donat-
ed by an industrial company,
E N A C T volunteers collected
thousands of brown and clear
glass containers from nearly
every major student housing
unit. Some glass was also donat-

ed by such units as the medical
science and chemistry buildings.
The glass was shipped weekly
to the University's North Cam-
pus dump site. From there it
was carried by a private con-
tractor to Charlotte, Mich.
where it was recycled.
Organizers of the recycling
drive emphasized that the glass,
project was a pilot program as
a part of an effort to bring
about a full-scale campus waste"
recycling system.
Much local environmental ac-
tion originates from the Ecolo-
gy Center, which has, sponsored
several environmental projects.
Last spring the center, along
with several groups, sponsored
a community garden project
called. GROW.
The project provides land to
people with seeds and a desire
to. do some organic gardening.
The idea for the project stem-
med from other local organic
garden projects, such as the

Stone School gardens and a
community garden on North
Campus.
Interested persons have thus
far donated 288 acres of land to
the GROW project. The groups
attracts a diverse membership
ranging from students to entire
families.
Most of the land the project
has received is available only
for this year. Its organizers hope
land will be permanently avail-
able once the groups becomes
firmly established.
Local ecology groups also
sponsored a third annual Earth
Weeknlast spring,sto raise money
and consciousness for the en-
vironment campaign. The week
featured activities for bicycle
enthusiasts and hikers, as well
as other ecology-minded citi-
zens.
During that week, the Ecolo-
gy Center sponsored "Alley
Days," a cleanup campaign dur-
ing which trash containers were
placed around the city.
The center, located at 417 De-
troit St., also maintains an en-
vironmental library consisting
of about 450 hardbound books
on ecology, as well as around
35 periodicals.
According to spokespersons,
the center will continue activi-
ties throughout the fall. Though
cooler weather will halt many
projects, such as the organic
gardens, the center will con-
tinue to press for environmental
reform.

co-op eating
at minimal prices

CONSUMER NEWS
And food prices go up and doWn

By JILL LAWRENCE
Hidden between a Turkish
import store and a barbershop
on S. State St. is a small door-
way. D e s p i t e its obscurity,
streams of people w a n d e r
through and down the stairs
carrying bags, bottles, and jars.
A small. piece of paper above
the door reads: Peoples' Food
Co-op.
One of four local food coopera-
tives, the Peoples' Food Co-op is
unlike your o r d i n a r y super-
market. The co-op's 3000 mem-
bers-anyone can join the co-op
by paying an initial fee of fifty
cents-all act as owner, employe
and customer. Members bring
their own food containers and,
using scales and tables, calculate
food prices, taking into account
the actual cost of food plus a
14 per cent mark-up to cover
operational costs.
The Peoples' Food Co-op be-
longs to the State Federation of
Food Co-ops, which is composed
of 20 food cooperatives around
the state. Much of the food sold
at this campus co-op comes from
a Federation warehouse.
Equipped with its own mill, the
warehouse is stocked with pro-
ducts from Boston, Minneapolis
and Arkansas.
Co-op member Jane Johnston
explained why it is necessary to
travel so far for food. "We're
working on local sources but
organic and processed products
are difficult to find near here."
Food sold at the Peoples' Food
Co-op includes peanut butter,
g r a i n s, nuts, beans, honey,
cheese, yogurt, dried fruit, and
bread.
There is no fresh produce for
sale at this co-op, but a sign on
the wall suggests that members
try the Itemized Food Co-op for
produce. Under this secondco-
op system, the city has been
Be o Winner
fBUY
U onf M

split into neighborhoods. Leaders
of each neighborhood take indi-
vidual orders, which are then
pooled, along with money and
working time.
A third popular local produce
co-op is the Rainbow People's
Party (RPP) vegetable co-op.
Begun nearly two years ago
when eight houses decided to
pool their money in an effort to
get better prices on vegetables,
the co-op last year had as many
as 350 participants. Each week,
participating people contribute
four dollars, which is then spent
on the best-priced items at De-
troit's Eastern Market.
Volunteers rise at 4:00 on Sat-
urday mornings to drive to De-
troit to purchase food and load
it onto trucks. On Saturday af-
ternoons, help is needed at the
two food distribution points (Hill
at S. Forest, S. Main and Mos-
ley) to unload trucks and sepa-
rate the produce into bags.
Weekly meetings of the RPP
vegetable co-op provide an op-
portunity for members to sug-
gest improvements.
"We see the need to expand
the, co-op to include dairy and
meat products," explained Peggy
Paute, a member of one of the
original eight houses. As yet,
however, this has not been pos-
sible.
During the fall and winter
terms, the community is served
by the S t u d e n t Government
Council meat co-op.

I

-

Rent your

This is the first in the summer series of
consumer surveys listing grocery prices around
town.
This survey indicates prices only. Shopping
at the "winning store" does not guarantee a
certain quality or that you will find exactly
what you want.

A group of University students with the aid
of the Public Interest Research Group in Michi-
gan (PIRGIM) surveyed 14 stores, comparing
prices on 98 items appearing on a typical shop-
ping list. The stores were ranked according to
cost for all products priced.

Roommate with
a Classified Ad

0ha4i4ij

CONEY
ISLAND
NO.36

I

I

. -

1211 S. University
OUR MNU

Rank, Name, Location
of Store
1 Great Scott
(Carpenter & Packard)
2 Meijer's
(Carpenter & Packard)
3 A&P
Maple Village
4 A&P:
E. Huron
5 Wrigley
Maple Village
6 A-& P
Stadium & State
Plymouth Road
8 Vesclo
W. Liberty, W. Stadium
9 kroger
Broadway
10 Wrigley
Stadium at Liberty
11 Wrigley
Wash. & Stadium
12 Kroger
West Gate
13 Kroger
Packard
14 Kroger
Arborland

PRICES SURVEY WEEK OF MAY 22, 1972

All Products Meats

Staples

Dairy Produce Other Non-Foods

OVER 600
PO5TERS
-To celebrate life

44.87

9.76

44.95 10.65

45.09
45.58
45.68
45.93
46.04
46.07
46.29
46.31
46.66
46.86

10.18
10.60
10.61
10.74
10.58
9.93
10.40
10.79
11.02
10.67

6.48
6.27
6.33
6.33
6.32
6.42
6.33
6.32
6.34
6.33
6.33
6.38
6.39
6.38

3.74
3.64
3,65
3.64
3.63
3.65
3.66
3.83
3.35
3.63
3.67
3.52
3.58
3 48

3.16
3.18
3.27

13.90
13.29
13.62

3.58 - 13.53

3.43
3.53
3.67
3.68
4.11
3.94
3.89
4.25
4.13
4.41

13.67
13.67
13.65
14.03
13.90
13.61
13.61
13.94
14.12
14.02

7.83
7.92
8.04
7.90
8.02
7.92
8.15
2.28
8.19
8.01
8.14
8.10
7.92
8.10

SWEATSHIRTS

I

T-SHIRTS
JACKETS
at
FOLLETTS
ft

Coney Island

Chili w/Beans

0p

-To stimulate action
-To cover your walls
with beauty and joy
1 ookslore
1205 S. University

loose Hamburger Chili, plain
French Fries
ALSO: Try Our
* ONASIS SPECIAL
" JACKIE SPECIAL
Sales Tax Is Included
in All of Our Prices
Put the Bite on Us,

I

PLUS: cards, books, bibles, gifts
like you have never seen!!!

e
---,

i

47.06 10.92

47.75

11.36

U I!

rEI
'
U'

4

A/

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