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November 09, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-09

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Thursday, November 9, 1972

1HE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Three

Thursday, November 9, 1972 iHE MICHIGAN DAILY i'age Three

BRIGHTON CINEMA 3
1-96 and Grand River-227-6144
CINEMA 1-SWINGING
STEWARDESSES & THE NIGHT
THEY RAIDED MINSKY'S
CINEMA IlI-KANSAS CITY
BOMBERS & SKYJACKED
CINEMA IIl-ASYLUM &
LET'S SCARE JESSICA
TO DEATH
MATINEES WED., SAT., SUN.
Admission $1.00
Theatre Club ID cards-75c
(for sr. citizens and students)
for student regularevening
admission at $1.25
Eve. shows start at 7:30

k

SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7-9:05
"JOHN KNOWLES'
CLASSIC
BEST-SELLER
BECOMES A CLASSIC
MOTION PICTURE"
"cA SEPARATE PEACE'
y 1 2*!1 New York
7C 7C /Doily News
A
SEPARATE
PEACE
M 1 IN COLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTLURE

Let's bury today

By DIANE LEVIC
The University's ne
tecture and Design bui
North Campus will acqu
tle bit of immortality a
tical appeal when art
bury a time capsule of
in its foundation in late
ber.
A variety of art works
ing lithographs, etchin
silk-screen prints, will b
in a metal capsule ab(
inches in diameter and t
a half feet long.
The capsule will then
ied beneath the new $81
art school, which is exp

for the fut
K be completed in a
w Archi- two years.
lding on The coordinators
ire a lit- capsule project,a
nd mys- Bernard O'Brien a
students dell, expect the ca
art work main buried for th
Novem- of the building-at l
Wedell explains tl
s, includ- pose of the project
igs, and porate our value sys
e placed capsule" to enablef
out eight ations to get a first
hree and our present society.
According to Ge
be bur- chairman of the Un
%2 million chitecture and De
pected to ment, burying relics

I

d

a .. .

Harvey Wasserman
former editor of the Michigan Daily and author of
"Harvey Wasserman's History of the United States"
will be
RAPPING ON RADICAL HISTORY
TONITE at 7:30 in the
UGLI Multi-Purpose Room
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
Four films of the historic comedian
Presented by the Collective Eye Film Series
Also, a short of the MC 5
3 SHOWS, 8-9:30-11:00 p.m.
on THURSDAY, NOV. 9; at
THE PEOPLE'S BALLROOM, 502 E. Washington
REFRESHMENTS 75c
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER AUDITIONS
Lion In Winter
ROLES: TWO WOMEN, FIVE MEN
SEPTEMBER 8, 9 & 10-7:30 p.m.
AACT Bldg., 201 Mulholland
(off West Washington)
PRODUCTION DATES: JANUARY 17-20
341 S. Main-769-5960
TONIGHT: GOLDEN OLDIES
DANCING: 8 P.M. to 2 A.M.
DRAFT BEER and PIZZA
04= =;>(O P==> 0 0=>Q)i ?)t()vU O
LQM
Unique Mexican Food
I ANN ARBOR and Cocktails
990 Broadway HOURS
PHONE Tues.-Fri 11 am-I pm
663-0563 Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m.-1 I p.m.
Ann Arbor's Mexican Restaurant
990 Broadway is on the north side of the Huron River
Bridge, 100 yds. south of the intersection of Plymouth Road
where it ends at Broadway.

buildings, especially religious
ones, has"plenty of'historical pre-
* * * cedence.
He views the art time capsule
as a "document of our time."
re J When it is finally unearthed,
1 Y Bayliss thinks "people can look
back and see what's taking place
pproximately today."
of the time In order to get a representa-
ot tuetse tive sampling of current art,
art students Wedell and O'Brien have organ-
nd Tom We- ized a group called MEMBRANE
ipsule to re- to solicit contributions for the
e entire life capsule.
east 70 years.
hat the pur- Why did they pick that partic-
is to "incor- ular name? It reflects the in-
stem into the terweaving of artist ideas they
future gener- hope to accumulate in the time
-hand look at capsule. Wedell feels that "mem-
brane symbolizes the web of
orge Bayliss, project participants.
iversity's Ar- MEMBRANE has contacted all
sign depart- kinds of artists across the coun-
of an era in try, asking them to submit what-
-- - -- ever they feel is appropriate.
Because of the capsule's size
limitations, small, two - dimen-
S ItS sional art works are favored.
Larry Stark, an Oregon artist,
however, sent MEMBRANE a
huge offset lithograph of an am-
bulence sitting in front of a Mc-
Donald's hamburger stand.
Underwear and a popsicle
a jazz tech- stick instrument for picking up
in barbour dog -feces have also been con-
lecture-dem- tributed as serious art.
orling Aud. MEMBRANE has also re-
at the door. ceived work through the prac-
tice of "mail order art," similar
to chain letters; they exchange
- art works with other artists
around the nation and Canada.
"Hopefully," says Wedell,
"we'll be able to cram every-
' thing we get into the capsule.
But if we wind up getting too
much material, we'll be forced
to edit."

Eleo Pomare Vt.
with dance comp

Visiting here this weekend to
offer lectures, demonstrations,
and classes, will be dancer-
choreographer Eleo Pomare and
his dance company.
Eleo Pomare was born in Car-
tagena, Colombia, and raised in
Panama. He came to New York
City at the age of 10 and gradu-
ated from the High School of
Performing Arts as a dance ma-
jor in 1956. Within two years he
had formed his first American
dance company and, in 1961, won
a John Hay Whitney Fellowship
to Europe.
LiRe imany Black artists before
him, he was to receive recogni-
tion abroad before achieving
success in the United States.
From 1962-64, his newly formed
European Company performed in
in Germany, Holland, Denmark,
Sweden, and Norway.
Pomare's teaching positions
included the National Ballet and
Scapino Ballet Companies in
Holland, Stockholm University,
and the First International Dance
Seminar of the Royal Dutch Bal-
let.
On his return to the U.S., he
revived and expanded his Amer-
ican Dance Company which has
toured since throughout the coun-
try. Among the company's not-
able successes has been "Blues
for the Jungle," which was cre-
ated as a tribute tohHarlem and
shown in rehearsal and perform-
ance on a unique ninety-minute
TV special by National Educa-
tional Television.
The Eleo Pomare Dance Com-
pany, an integrated but pre-
dominately Black dance com-
pany, was organized in New
York City in 1958. From the out-
set, the company took as its
purpose "the creative utilization
of Negro talent and ability in
Contemporary Modern Dance in
an effort to break away from
confining stereotypes of Negro or
Primitive dance."
This Friday, the Company will
offer an intermediate - advance
Modern technique master class
in Barbour gym, 2-3:30; lecture/
demonstration in Schorling Aud.,
7-8.30 and also 9-10:30 that night.
This Saturday, the Company
will offer a beginning modern
technique master class in Bar-

bour gym, 11-12:30;
nique master class
gym, 1-2:30; and
onstration in Sch
3:30-5.
Tickets available

Radio King and the Court of Rhythm in this year's Homecoz
Rhythm and.blues
with Radio King

Eleo Pomare

0

S

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 sewing Skills
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Secretarial Techniques

Although there is no dearth
of contributions, according to
Bayliss, they are still being so-
licited and gladly accepted. If
editing is needed in the future,
Wedell thinks it may be done by
some type of jury.
Wedell notes that all art work
which is not placed in the time
capsule will be returned to the
sender.
Artists wishing to contribute to
MEMBRANE should submit their
work to 401 E. Madison No. 6.
8:00 2 The Waltons
4 Flip Wilson
7 Mod Squad
56 Advocates
9:00 2 Movie
"Wait Until Dark." (1967)
4 Ironside
7 News
56 International Performance
.:30 9 Word of Power
10:00 4 Dean Martin
7 Owen Marshall
9 Telescope
50 Perry Mason
56 Masterpiece Theatre
10:30 9 Countrytime
11:00 2 4 7 9 News, Weather, Sports
50 Goldiggers
11:20 9 Nightbeat
11:30 2 Movie
"Home of the Brave." (1949)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett
50 Movie
"Sol Madrid," (1968)
.2:00 9 Movie
"Berlin Affair." (1970)
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Hitt and Run." (French; 1958)
3:00 2 News

By DAVE UNNEWEHR
To "Radio King" Richard
Dishman and singer Patricia
Bova, their band Radio King and
the Court of Rhythm is a dream
band come true.
Radio King formed last sum-
mer when Pat and Richard re-
cruited talented musicians lo-
cally and as far away as Bos-
ton to create a ten piece rhythm
and blues revue. For weeks after
that, they belted out a unique
R & B sound four nights a week
to usually overflowing, often
volatile crowds at Mackinac
Jack's.
TheJstrength of any band lies
with its individual members.
Up front Radio King features
the Royal Crowns, the band's
section which includes one trum-
pet and two saxes. Typically
their sets open with the Royal
Crowns leading t h e group
through several flashy instru-
mental numbers, followed by a
drum roll and the cry: "let's
bring on the girls."
The "girls" are Pat, Jodi, and
Jill: together they sing, wail,
and feel rhythm and blues. Some-
times their harmonies are so
clean and sweet one could easily
mistake them for the Lennon
sisters, other times there's no
misunderstanding the soulful,
gutsv sound of Aretha Franklin
or Gladys Knight.
Radio King is held tightly to-
gether by their rhythm section
composed of drums, bass, guitar,
and piano. On stage the entire
band is a finely woven piece of
pageantry and sound.
Putting a ten piece band on
stage isn't easy and not least
among problems is finding a
place to practice and perform.
"Mackinac Jack's is about the
only local bar big enough to
hold us." laments Richard. "And
splitting the cut ten ways
doesn't make anyone wealthy
. . . You have to really want to
do it."
The band considers the mes-
sage in rhythm and blues as im-
portant as the music itself. "Un-
consciously we lean towards po-
sitive songs like "Respect
"Y o u r s e If" or "Friendship
Train," reflects Pat. "Rhythm
and blues is music about every-
day people, their problems,
hangups, and love. The music
and words illustrate a feeling
that although I'm down now
things are going to get better."
"Unfortunately, she added, lvr-
ics are often crippling and for
that reason we've started writing
our own songs. Too many songs
are either down on women or of
the self-pitying variety - You-
left - me-baby-and-I'm-going-to-
go - jump-in-the-lake-type-stuff.
On stage our message is to get
people up and dancing."
Radio King members have
backgrounds as varied as the

ten people in the band. Musical
training ranges from the trum-
pet player who is a grad stu-
dent in the music school, to
Richard who in his words,
"picked up sticks and started
drumming." Pat and Jodi start-
ted harmonizing together four
years ago in Stockwell Hall.
Richard describes the band
with words like "committment
and cooperation."
"This is the kind of band most
of us always wanted to play in
and we want to follow our music
to its logical resolution." This

7:00 2
4
7
9
50
56

mng Ozone Parade.
might include taking the band on
the road where they can play,
feel, and even breathe together.
It's hard to ignore the sense
of cooperation between members
of the group. No one competes
for the center of attention; ev-
eryone is a star and has time to
solo. Unlike many bands who try
to impress their audiences with
a wall of sound, Radio King
rehearses soft with a unity of
vocal harmony, lead, and rhy-
thm. Gradually the volume is
cranked up, but never to the
point of blasting eardrums.
For Radio King and the Court
of Rhythm, the future is rela-
tively uncertain. But if they
keep thinking positively and
churning out their mellow R&B
sound, this is one Ann Arbor
band we're going to hear a lot
from.

Truth or Consequences
News, Weather, Sports
To Tell the Truth
Beverly Hillbillies
I Love Lucy
Dateline America

CULTURE CALEPMNDAR
MUSIC-School of Music String Dept. Recital, SM Recital
Hall, tonight at 8.
FILM-the AA Film Co-op shows Furie's The Ipcress File
tonight in Aud. A, at 7, 9:30. Daily reviewer Terry Martin
comments:
Grumbling all 'he while at having to leave his nice
London flat, Michael Caine methodically tracks down
the bad guys in this British spy thriller. Caine's role as
Harry Palmer is hardly your typical hard-loving, hard-
driving secret agent, but subtle vibes are better than
none. A classy movie with some beautiful Technicolor
scenes of London.
Cinema Guild presents a program of short films by
and about women tonight: Anything You Want To Be;
Dorothy Proving Ground; Growing Up Female; Schmeer-
guntz; in Arch. Aud. at 7, 9:30. The Library Film Series
shows James Baldwin's Harlem, with commentary by
Carolyn Gibson, this afternoon in UGLI Multi-purpose
Rm. at 3:30.
DRAMA-the Soph Show presents "Cabaret" at 8:30 tonight
in Power Center. The Student Lab Theatre presents
Stein's Three Sisters Who Are Not Sisters and Richard-
son's Gallows Humor II at 4:10 this afternoon at Frieze
Arena.
ART-Andy Warhol prints at the Museum of Arts today from
9 to 5. An exhibition by Ann Arbor Women Painters, to-
day at Rackham Gallery.
RADIO SPECIAL--WCBN F.M. 89.5 presents Miles Davis, a
six hour special, tonight 8 to 2.
Information concerning happenings to appear in Cul-
ture Calender should be sent to the Arts Editor c/o The
Daily.
Under grads read
disapointing poetry

7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Circus!
7 Half the George Kirby
Comedy Hour
9 Movie
''Tarzan and the Lost Safari."
(English, 1956)
50 Pro Hockey

__

The School of Music presents two one-act operas
Puccini s SISTER ANGELICA
Ibert's ANGELIQUE

I

I

Se ann arb or i *m cooperative
"THE IPCRESS FILE'IS A
THINKING MAN'4
'GOLDFINGER' !"
-NEWSWEEK
"A TINGLING,
NO-NONSENSEf
SUSPENSE YARN"
-TIME
"A BLOOD 'N GUTS
SPY THRILLER!"
-N.Y. DAILY NEWS /
ARY SUilMAN 'a
presents *l
from the realess
est"uetby
Starring - atle stSm
NIGEL GREEN-GUY DOLEMAN -SUE LLOYD
HARRY SALTZMAN-SIDNEY1. RFRIE
(.ti wu.c CHARLES KASHER - Screenplay by BLCANAWAY& JAMES DORAN
Music composed andconducted b BARRY
TECHNICOLOR' TECHNISCOPE' rnal noun track album
A iIlUrneAR FI rAe IOnlyi nOECCA RECORDSI

NOV. 17, 18, 20, and 21F
8:00 P.M.
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
TICKETS: $3.00
Some reserved seating available at $1.50 for
University students with I.D. cards. Sold at Box
Office only.

n English
Conductor: JOSEF BLATT
Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT
MAIL ORDERS:
School of Music Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre,
The University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

BOX OFFICE OPENS NOVEMBER 13 AT 12:30 P.M. INFORMATION: 764-6118

By GLENN DAVIS
Just returned from England,
Prof. Donald Hall opened Tues-
day's poetry reading in the
UGLI. - multipurpose room with
a eulogy to Ezra Pound. Calling
the recently deceased poet "the
most influencial poet in the 20th
century," Hall then renounced
Pound and his later poetry for
its involvement with politics.
Reading their poetry Tuesday
were four undergraduate stu-
dents selected by the English
department.
Ken Shulze, a senior who read
in memory of Pound, was the
best poet who read and the only
one who can even be thought of
as a poet. Consider these lines:
he taught sky-readers
the illusion 'of black print
and
never awaited a shadow to-
gether
on a rock
Marcy Perry carried on where
Don's voice and mind left off.
Her heavy voice didn't make up
S . NEW

for the lack of themes. She
didn't really say anything -just
hooked images together. She
did, however, come up with
some decent things at times, but
even these were half-baked:
told you in death kitchens
A nunnish woman by the name
of Kathleen read about saints
and bishops and then tried some-
thing more personal about the
Detroit Farmer's Market and
could only come off sounding
quaint.
Linda - with short hair,
a sweet face and sweet falter-
ing voice - lilted her wordy
imageless compositions from her
ears and not her soul. Aside from
poetic evaluation - she just
didn't know what she was talk-
ing about and couldn't begin to
express it.
The last to read was a Dracu-
lish preach. One line from his
work stuck in my mind:
stones eroded by the years and
devout
Maybe there is some good
symbolism here but I would
have to read more of his work
to understand.
I hope that the "real poets" in
the undergraduate division were
not represented in Tuesday's
reading. If so, I am really dis-
appointed.

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