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November 08, 1972 - Image 20

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Michigan Daily, 1972-11-08

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Poge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdoy, November 8, 197

Poge Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesdoy, November 8, 1972

Coleman, Levin leading
in Supreme Court race

Victory imminent for Lansing,
Roach in U' Reoents election

A

today..
if you see news happen call 76-DAILY
Those behind the scenes
The Daily would like to thank those who helped us put out,
this election night edition. For the loan of a copying machine,
we'd like to thank Nick DePaolo of Pitney-Bowes, the folks that
invented the mailing machine. Dunkin' Donuts provided our
staff with seven dozen donuts, and the people in the office of
Dave Folsom, business manager for University relations and
development, loaned us their coffee-maker. It helped us stay
awake u(fl 5 a.m. Thanks!
Wither goest my polling place?
Students weren't the only ones confused by changes made
in polling places over the summer. President Robben Fleming
reportedly arrived at the League at 9 a.m. to vote, but was told
he was at the wrong place. So Fleming had to truck on back to
the Union to vote - right across from his Administration Bldg.
office.
The koll ege vote?
TAMPA - The Kiddie Kollege Kindergarten cast their ballots
yesterday and among the presidential picks were President Nixon,
George Washington and Tim Cloversettle, a five-year-old who
voted for himself. The total vote was Nixon 64, George Mc-
Govern, 17, Washington, 6, Cloversettle, 1, and two ministers
at the school, 8.
the dropped vote
LITTLE DIOMEDE ISLAND, Alaska - It took a special
airplane drop to get the ballots to remote Little Diomede
Island but the results will not be officially reported until after
the President is inaugurated. The island's 37 residents received
their ballots Oct. 22 and radioed unofficial reports of the voting
to Nome last night. However, official reports will not be in until
the Bering Sea freezes later this winter when a trip to the remote
island can be made.
Colorado cans Olympics
Deciding the fate of the 1976 Winter Olympic Games sched-
uled for Denver, Colorado voters were on the verge of cutting
off all state funds. With 515 of 2,045 precincts reporting, 128,661
ballots had been cast to cut off funds and .108,062 had voted to
continue funding.
The weather picture
They'll be clouds for your post-election melancholia,
with highs in the low 50s. At night it "will drop to the mid-
30s, but there's only 20 per cent chance of rain.
Senatoral raees

Judge Mary Coleman and Judge
Charles Levin defeated seven oth-
er candidates this morning for two
vacant seats on the State Su-
preme Court.
With 30 per cent of the vote
counted, Levin led the race with
274,225 votes. Coleman ran second
with 271,051, according to NBC.
Earlier totals put Judge James
Thorburn and Human Rights party
candidate Zolton Ferency in third
and fourth places.
Thorburn polled 50,732, Ferency
received 40,398 votes.
The earlier. tallies of the other
candidates, with eight per cent
totaled, were: Judge Horace Gil-
more, 32,815 votes; Judge Robert4
Evans, 31,689 votes; Judge Vincent
Brennan, 31,618 votes; William Ort-
man, 16,921 votes; and Judge Wil-
liam Beer, 16,913 votes. No later
tallies were reported this morning.
Coleman is the first woman to;
seek election to the State Supreme
Court. She has served as Calhoun \~
County Probate and Juvenile Court 4
judge since 1961.
Coleman is considered a judicialr
conservative and ran with the back-
ing of the Republican Party.
Coleman holds a bachelor's de-
gree in English education from the .
University of Maryland and a law
degree from Georgetown Univer-
sity.
She says she believes firmly in , under
the supremacy of the rule of law. John Schmitz, lame-duck congres
Levin has beena judgeon the Party candidate for President, w
State Court of Appeals since 1966. nm taplig lc nTsi
He ran under the Non-Partisan name at a polling place inTust
Judicial Party banner, a party (CIR( CUIT COURT:
created for his candidacy.11Vl J 1 1
He favors the legalization of
marijuana and decriminalization of "
victimless crimes. ,
Levin was chairman of the Mich- IItgn en unCovi
igan Penal Reform Commission
and has consistently supported pol-
lution and consumer cases in his I-r T O
court decisions. LP t
He holds a bachelor's and law
degrees from the University. i
Thorburn, a circuit judge for Judge Patrick Conin was headed
nine years, believes that the Su- toward a landslide victory last4
preme Court should interpret the night in the race for two vacant
law and not legislate. He has also seats on the Washtenaw CountyI
called for more efficient judicial Circuit Court. Conlin outpolled the
administration. field of candidates with a vote
Ferency is a co-founder of the total of 14,824, with 26 per cent of
Human Rights Party. the precincts reporting.
An unsuccessful Democratic gu- District Court Judge Edward
bernatorial nominee in 1966, Fer- Deake and Shirley Burgoyne, a
ency was formerly active in Dem- local attorney, were engaged in a
ocratic politics, close contest for the other seat.
Having practiced law since 1953, IDeake capturedo11,121 votes com-
Ferency says he is concerned about pared to Burgoyne's 10,052. District
opening up the legal system to Court Judge Sanford Elden, the
everybody, and changing repres- fourth candidate, trailed the pack
sive and outmoded laws.gwith 6,681 votes.
Ferency supports the legalization
of .marijuana and the decriminali- The validity of the early returns!
zation of victimless crimes. were in doubt, however, as the re-

Although early returns showed
Republicans sweeping open seats
on state education boards, returns
from down-state put several Demo-
cratic contenders in the lead.
Both Democratic candidates for
two vacant seats on the University
Board of Regents pulled ahead
early this morning.
With 28 per cent of the vote
counted,Marjorie Lansing received
410,758 and Thomas Roach 393,866,
beating Republican incumbent
Lawrence Lindemer and Republi-
can Deane Baker.
In the race for two seats on the
State Board of Education, Repu-
blican William Sederburg and
Democrat Charles Morton held the
lead.
Two Democrats, Tom Downs and
Donna O'Donnohue appeared head-
ed for victory in the race for
Michigan State University trustee-
ships with 28 per cent of the vote
in.
In the Wayne State University
race, Brucker had 9,225 votes and
Keydel had 8,491.
Lansing, an associate professor
of political science at Eastern
Michigan University; is a city resi-
dent. She favors organizing a
grocery co-op, student input in
decision making and publication of
salary lists with professors names.
Roach is a practicing attorney in
a Detroit law firm.
In 1969, Lindemer was again ap-
pointed to serve out an unfulfilled.
term. He is a practicing attorney
and a resident of Stockbridge.
Baker is a city resident and
president of the Deane Baker Cor-
poration. He has previously served
on Grand Valley State College
Board of Control.
Voting straight party tickets
seemed to play a large role in the
Republican leads.

i

Lansing

Roach

Deihey holds strong
margin over Sallade

dog votes
sman and American Independent
watches his wife, Mary, sign her
n, Cal., prior to voting yesterday.

Early results from the county
prosecutor's race showed incum-
bent Republican William Delhey
leading Democrat George Sallade,
25,999 votes to 23,422 votes, with
most of the 67 reporting precincts
in heavily Republican areas of the
county.
Except for Delhey's strong lead,
there were few surprises in the
contest, with voting blocs breaking
down along predictable lines.
Sallade, confident of backing
from Democratic party regulars,
tried to attract the student vote
by making victimless crime, espe-
cially prosecution of marijuana
cases, a major campaign issue.
Delhey sought support from the
more conservative elements of the
county, stressing his 12 years of

ns; Deake,
still close
turns were mostly from city pre-
cincts. Deake has run extremely
strong in out-county districts in
past elections, while Burgoyne is
making her first bid for office.
The 21 per cent vote tabulated
represents totals from non-student
areas of Ann Arbor. No vote totals
were available from campus poll-
ing locations.
A large student vote could bene-
fit Burgoyne who has been cam-
paigning on women's liberation
issues. Elden, notorious among stu-
dents for a ruling that struck down
the city's five dollar marijuana
ordinance, is expected to fair poor-
ly in campus returns.
Deake is unlikely to pick up
mnn strident votes- His 14th Dis-

Four more years:
Nixon, Agnew win

with police and county officials.
With little of the student vote in,
Sallade said that "the race is still
nip and tuck" and he would make
no predictions "until I hear from
large city precincts."
His hope for a strong student
turnout may be too optimistic, as
delays ataovercrowded campus
polling places and early returns
showing Nixon's strong lead caused
many discouraged students to leave
without voting.
In the three-way race for county
clerk, incumbent Robert Harrison
held a large lead over Democrat
Duke Armstrong with reports from
67 precincts out of 166. The voting,
10,000 for Harrison, and 7,334 for
Armstrong gave the Democrat little
hope for victory. Stuart Norman,
running on the Independent party
ticket, polled only 235 votes.
Outcome of the County Drain
Commissioner contest is still in
doubt, with Republican Richard
Wanty leading Jerome Fulton by
8,666 to 8,442. Democrat Fulton is
also expecting strong support from
the student precincts.
The three county-wide referenda
on the ballot asked that the county
be given permission to borrow
funds for construction of a new
jail, county offices and court fa-
cilities, and improvements for the
present county medical care fa-
cilities.
The first proposal, for a new
county correctional facility, was
winning 7,922 votes to 7,688 votes,
with about one-third of the pre-
cincts reporting.
Proposal II, for construction of
new county court and office facili-
ties, was losing by a narrow mar-
gin, 7,672 votes to 7,507.
The proposal for improvements
of county health facilities was go-
ing down to defeat, 10,765 votes to
4,505.

STATE
(Party in office)
Alabama (D)
.Alaska (R)
Arkansas (D)
Colorado (R)
Delaware (R)
Georgia (D)
Idaho (R)
Illinois (R)
Iowa (R)
Kansas (R)
Kentucky (R)
Louisiana (D)
Maine (R)
Mass. (R)
Michigan (R)
Minnesota (D)
Mississippi (D)
Montana (D)
Nebraska (R)
New Hamp. (D)
N. Jersey (R)
N. Mexico (D)
N. Caro. (D)
Oklahoma
Oregon (R)
R. Island (D)
S. Caro. (R)
S. Dak. (R)
Tennessee (R)

Results
Pct. Units
Reporting

as of midnight
DEMO-
CRAT
Sparkman* (E)
Guess

REPUBLI-
CAN
Blount
Stevens*

McClellan* (E) Babbitt

59

Haskell (E)
293,344
Biden

Allott* 279,047
Boggs*

IdIy SUUI U . 11 IIIL
trict Court is located in the Pitts-
field Service Center and is out
of the mainstream of city activity.
Conlin, son of recently deceased
Circuit Judge John Conlin Sr., is
se s 'con trTJ ou se the;youngestcandidate.He. has
(~_, u soenro broad-based appeal among older
voters because of his family name
(Continued from Page 1) 12-1 margin. But they re-elected in- and among student voters because
E a s t l a n d (D-Miss.), Edward cumbent Democratic Sen. Jennings of his liberal image.
Brooke (R-Mass.), Strom Thur- Randolph by an even larger vote- Conlin has vowed to reform bail-
mond (R-S.C.) and John Tower (R- almost 70 per cent. bonding, restructure court admin-
Texas) rolled to re-election. M a n istration, and make the court easily
One of the tightest Senate races istratiokDemocraticcandidates,adke
was in Delaware, where Democrat particularly in the South, had dis- accessible.
Joseph Biden narrowly led Repub- associated themselves from Demo- CircuitCourt has jurisdiction for
lican incumbent Caleb Boggs last cratic candidate George McGovern small civil suit cases. Judges are
night. Biden, 29, would be the in an attempt to save themselves elected on a non-partisan basis for
youngest senator in history if victory. four-year terms of office.
elected.

44
15
14
98
61
65
18
26
26

Nunn (E) 228,410 Thompson 153,005

Davis 17,650
Pucinski
Clark (E) 60,902
Tetzlaff
Huddleston
(E) 515,474
Johnston (E)
316,049
Hathaway (E)
92,971
Droney
Kelley 1,033,000
Mondale* (E)

McClure 21,547
Percy* (E)
Miller* 50,254
Pearson* (E)
Nunn 475,180
Toledano 105,653.
McKiethen***
136,877
Smith* 86,561
Brooke*
Griffin* 1,087,000
Halpert*** 6467
Hansen

t

Eastland* 85,082 Carmichael 54,875

Metcalf*

Hibbard

61

Carpenter 161,304 Curtis* 172,570

46
31
19
50
55
25

McIntyre* (E)
Krebs 450,083
Daniels 86,151
Galifianakis
181,328
Edmondson
226,899
Morse
Pell* (E)
21,378
Zeigler 111,878
Abourezk (E)
30,417
Blanton
Sanders
Spong* 438,900

Powell
Case (E) 853,481
Domenici (E)
101,447
Helms 202,164
Bartlett 268,460
Hatfield
Chafee 15,709
Thurmond* (E)
190,236
Hirsch 23,863
Baker* (E)
Tower* (E)
Scott 504,108

Andrew Young was elected con-
gressman from Atlanta, to become
the first black man from the South
in Congress since Reconstruction.
Barbara Jordan was elected from
Houston as the first southern black
woman ever to sit in Congress.
Millions of voters split their bal-
lots, voting for both Nixon and
Democratic S e n a t e candidates.
Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi,
and West Virginia, for example, all
apparently e I e c t e d Democratic
senators while voting overwhelm-
ingly for the President.
West Virginia voters, indicative
of the split-ticket voting,preferred
Nixon to McGovern by an almost
HRP loses
county race
(Continued from Page 1)
HRP line."
The two districts which corres-
pond closely to the city's First and
Second Wards are predominantly
student areas. They were con-
sidered HRP strongholds and the
loss in both districts could be view-
ed as a slippage of support among
student voters.
TheWashtenaw County Board of
Commissioners is currently divided
between nine Republicans and four
Democrats. Both the 14th and 15th
districts are new ones, as they
were created only this past spring.
With the election of liberal Dem-
ocrats in the two districts, ob-
servers feel there is a chance the

Gubernatorial results
With 10 Democratic and eight Republican governorships up for
grabs, returns late last night indicated neither party would increase
their total number of seats. Currently, the incumbent party is threat-
ened in only two states, one Democratic- and one Republican-control-
led. Many races were still undecided.
In Missouri, Republican Christopher Bond defeated Edward Dowd.
But that potential GOP pick-up will be offset if Illinois Democrat
Daniel Walker maintains his thin lead over Illinois incumbent Gov.
Richard Ogilvie. With 61 per cent of the precincts tabulated, Walker
led by 110,000 votes.
Republicans Otis Bowen and Robert Ray were elected in Indiana
and Iowa, respectively. Democratic winners were Dale Bumpers in
Arkansas, Robert Docking in Kansas, and Utah's Calvin Rampton, all
incumbents.
Democrats were leading in Arkansas, North Carolina, South Da-
kota, Texas, and Utah, Republicans were leading in Indiana, Iowa,
Missouri, New Hampshire, and West Virginia.
Democrats won in Arkansas, South Dakota, Vermont, North
Dakota and Utah. Republicans were victorious in Indiana, Iowa, Mis-
souri, New Hampshire and West Virginie.
2:00 a.m. Results

(Continued from Page 1)
a telegram, McGovern called upon
his followers to "play the role of
the loyal opposition."
The senator said his campaign
was successful in that it "pushed
this country in the direction of
peace."
"We will press on with that ef-
fort," he said, "but we do not
rally to the support of policies that
we deplore."
The chief McGovern issue in the
final days of the campaign-cor-
ruption in the administration-did
not catch on.
McGovern's tenuous ,coalition of'
college youth, minorities, blue col-
lar workers, and disaffected groups
within the country turned out to be
insufficient in number to prevent
a Nixon avalanche.
The South Dakota senator had
lashed outhagainstaadministration
economic and Vietnam policies in
the closing hours of the campaign.
While the President relaxed in his
oceanside California home over the
weekend, McGovern hopped across
the country in a frantic search for
votes.
Vietnam-the issue which had
elevated McGovern to national
prominence-faded into the back-
ground of his own campaign as
peace hopes brightened. Only in
HRP should
retain state
ballot spot
Late returns in the state's sena-
torial race show Human Rights
Party candidate Barbara Halpert
gaining momentum in her quest
for some 14,300 votes - w h i c h
would keep the locally-based par-
ty on the state-wide ballot in the
future.
Running as expected far behind
her opponents Robert Griffin and
Frank Kelly, Halpert has received
10,496 votes, with 62 per cent of
the state's precincts reporting, ac-
cording to United Press Interna-
tional.
As the highest candidate on
HRP'stslate, Halpert must receive
at least 1 per cent of the secre-
tary of state's wining vote in the
last election.
Included in the untallied 40 per
cent is the Ann Arbor vote, which
r amld r avrl cnffirint rin-,rt

Popular Vote

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania

25 68,239-24 , 215,562-75

15
6
4
60
53
62
100
74
24
11
36
12
58
6
15
97
2
8
99
7
19
5
22
30
27
66
74
21
46
10
4
14
3
49
30
36
31

23,029-32
8,213-33
205,275-39
218,090--35
259,856-41
54,197-38
32,006-72
543,740-28
47,559-21
9,693-39
28,419-27
241,054-47
430,489-33
15,187-39
42,042-27
357,701-35'
6,004-28
506-30
480,834-37
63,360--63
276,509-37
45,217-49
26,275-20
198,661-36
40,042-41
110,186-30
51,286-38
7,455-28
411,246-34
13,874-38
153,829-36
49,042-28
2,712-29
736,305-39
82,925-22-
96,963-41
590,948-42

46,707-65
16,240-67
295,923-58
386,682-63
366,051-58
83,600-61
12,849-28
1,385,557-72
172,795-79
14,858-61
70,005-65
264,938-53
854,392-67
22,949-59
110,293-71
649,583-64
14,298-67
853-70
787,524-62
37,949-37
455,697-62
46,243-51
101,924-78
347,391-64
51,964-55
251,517-70
83,310-62
18,490-71
787,703-65
22,025-60
267,366-64
121,284-74
6,284-69
1,149,437-60
277,259-76
127,360-55
802,737-57

9
6
7
8
3

3

6
45

3

14

Electoral Vote

Returns by states
Results as of 2:00 a.m.

y
..

an
04
0d)

za4

k
I
I
e
7
a
I
1
I
I

C
s
a
O
v

b
as
+M
Neil M
z

the last two days had he once!
again brought the issue to the fore.
Already, some observers have
suggested a resurgence within the
Democratic Party of Southern
"Dixiecrats" and power brokers
such as Chicago's Mayor Richard
Daley.
Alabama Gov. George Wallace
predicted last nightthathis sup-
porters will gain control of the
Democratic Party after the Mc-
Govern defeat. He said in a tele-
vision interview, "The great Demo-
cratic Party of the past will come
back."
"But with those who expressed
the views I expressed in control."
experience, and his good relations,

4TATE

(Party in offic
Arkansas (D)
Delaware (R)
Illinois (R)
Indiana (R)
Iowa (R)
Kansas (D)
Missouri (D)
Montana (D)
N. Hampshire (R)
N. Carolina (D)
N. Dakota (D)

ce)

Pct. Units
Reporting

DEMO-
CRAT

Bumpers* (E)
Tribbitt
61 Walker1,412,695
59 Welsh 552,340
Franzenburg
Docking* (E)
30 Dowd 233,388
Judge
Crowley
McLane**
58 Bowles 378,364
48 Link (E) 64,265

REPUBLI-
CAN
Blaylock
Peterson*
Ogilvie* 1,302,900
Bowen (E) 747,794
Ray* (E)
Kay
Bond 322,646
Smith
Thomson
Hosshouser
392,814
Larsen 60,105

17
12
4
4
26
13
7
9
10
10
21
7
12
4
S
3
4
17
4
41
13
3
25
8
6
27

10

4 4

8

4

A

Texas (R)
Virginia (D)

72

... ty:._.. .., . -

4

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