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November 08, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-08

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Wednesday, November 8, 1977

i He MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, November ~, 1912 iHE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Duke Ellington:
Beyond category

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TUES. Alice at 7:20
Sex at 9:15
WED. Continuous
From 1 p.m.

Edward Kennedy "Duke" El-
lington is probably best described
by a pair of his own superla-
tives, which he has used to hon-
or qualities he admires in others
. . . "a man of heroic propor-
tions" and "beyond category."
The terms apply to Ellington as
a person, as a composer, as a
writer, as a philosopher, and as
the leader of today's most fam-
ous and exciting orchestra.
This man, a "legend in his
own time," will be presented by
the University Musical Society
in a special Benefit Concert this
Saturday at 8:30 in Hill Auditor-
ium.
Contributions will help insure
the long-standing tradition of ex-
cellent concerts in Ann Arbor.
Twice honored as "this year's
most honored musician," Elling-
ton is a man applauded by a va-
riety of organizations and indi-
viduals too numerous to mention.
He has received ten honor-
ary degrees including honorary
doctorates from Brown, Wash-
ington and Yale Universities.
In May of 1970, Ellington was
inducted into the National In-
stitue of Arts and Letters, and in
June of the same year, the Amer-

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER AUDITIONS
Lion In Winter
ROLES: TWO WOMEN, FIVE MEN
SEPTEMBER 8, 9 & 10-1:30 p.m.
AACI Bldg., 201 Mulholland
(off West Washington)
PRODUCTION DATES: JANUARY 17-20
"EXTRAORDINARILY JOYFUL . . . BOUND TO STIMULATE
AND MOVE." -Boyum, Wall Street Journal
From the
best-seller
that really knew
a generation.
ASEPARA
Screep*DyBased onhe ebPoduceda l
FRED SEGAL JOHN KNOWLES ROBERT A. GOLDSTON
Open 12:45 Weds. are
Shows at Bargain Day!
Daily Adults 75c
1. 3, 3. 7, 9 1-5 p.m. Wed.
NEXT: George C. Scott in "RAGE"

ican Ballet Theatre premiered
his ballet, THE RIVER, at Lin-
coln Center of the Performing
Arts in New York City.
A frequent guest at the White
House through several adminis-
trations, the Maestro's best
known invitation was a guest of
honor at a gala birthday party
given him in 1969 by President
and Mrs. Richard Nixon. At this
party the President presented El-
lington with the Presidential Me-
dal of Freedom, the highest civil-
ian award of the United States.
Appointed to the National
Council on the Arts by President
Johnson, he also has been wel-
comed as a fellow "piano play-
er" by Harry Truman.
The independent African na-
tion of Togo issued a series of
postage stamps in 1967, com-
memorating the world's greatest
composers . . . Johann Sebastian
Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven,
Claude Debussy and Edward
Kennedy Ellington. This is the
first time that a living composer
has been so honored.
On September 16, 1965, Duke
. Ellington presented his first
CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC
at Grace Cathedral, San Fran-
cisco.
Since that memorable night,
Duke Ellington and his Orches-
tra, have performed hundreds of
Concerts of Sacred Music in the
sanctuaries of nearly every de-
nomination around the world.
With a rigorous schedule any-
one else would find totally ex-
hausting, Ellington is so stimu-
lated by his constantstouring
and by his continuous exposure
to people of all the world's cul-
tures, that he is writing all the
time. He is always at work on
either an opera or several mu-
sical plays simultaneously, in
addition to the shorter composi-
tions which seem to flow steadily
from his pen and portable elec-
tric piano as he travels.
T h e incomparable Ellington
orchestra, which, in a typical
month, can span the spectrum of
sacred concerts in churches and
synagogues, performances with
major symphony orchestras, col-
lege dances and symposia, night-
clubs, dance halls, television
specials and Las Vegas hotels, is
the only musical aggregation in
the world playing 52 weeks a
year and rarely with so much as
one day off. It
Little wonder that President
Nixon has appointed the person-
able Dr. Duke Ellington official
goodwill envoy for American mu-
sic abroad. Undoubtedly, the bril-
liant Duke Ellington will continue
to hold, unchallenged, the title of
the most honored musician for
many years to come.

Duke Ellington

CULTURE CALENDAR
FILM-Cinema Guild is showing Godard's Une Femme Est
Une Femme in Arch. Aud. at 7 and 9:05. Daily reviewer
David Gruber comments:
Godard's Une Femme Est Une Femme has the ap-
pearance of a New Wave home movie. Basically, it con-
cerns a stripper who wants a child but whose boyfriend
won't oblige her. So, a proposition is made to their best
friend. The outcome of this is not so important as the
viewer's realization that Godard is merely playing with
pot and the movie medium itself and the viewer. As
ever, Godard is Godard.
AA Film Co-op is presenting Lumet's The Seagull in
Aud. A at 7 and 9:30. Daily reviewer William Mitchell has
this to say about the film :
This 1968 release has Simone Signoret miscast as an
aging actress vacationing in Sweden at the turn of the
century with her lover (James Mason) and son (David
Warner), both of whom share the affections of another,
younger actress (Vanessa Redgrave). The characteriza-
tions are fairly strong in this film, particularly Miss Red-
grave, but still not quite strong enough to support this
poorly adapted vehicle.
The Psych 171 film series is showing Great American
Novel: Babbitt; Ersatz; Very Very Nice at 4 in the UGLI
Multi-purpose room
DRAMA-The Student Lab Theatre presents Stein's Three
Sisters who are not Sisters and Richardson's Gallows
Humor II at 4:10 in the Frieze Arena,
BOOKS-Professor Richard W. Bailey discusses J. L. Dilliard's
Black English at 12:10 in AA Public Library's Meeting
Room.
UPCOMING CONCERT TIP-The 5th Dimension will appear
inconcert on Friday, Nov. 10 in Bowen Field House at
EMU. Paul Williams will perform preceding the main
attraction.
MUSIC-The University Musical Society presents the Yuval
Trio from Israel in Rackham Auditorium at 8:30.

Ark: Performers
and warmth unique
By MATTHEW GERSON opportunities for mixing w i t h
The room looks much like any student "regulars" at the Ark.
large, old and comfortable liv- The success of these get-togethers
ing room. Cushion seats cover has created "more closeness and
the floor near an open fireplace common interests between t h e
where a variety of folksingers two groups," David says.
perform weekly. The Ark's present weekly sch-
The Ark, once a small church edule of activities include Sun-
coffeehouse, has evolved under day night theological discussions,
the co-direction of managers community potluck dinners,
Linda and David Siglin into a Tuesday open sensitivity training
place offering a wide range of sessions, a 'hoot' and amateur
folk music, community-church night on Wednesday, "high cali-
gatherings, arts and poetry work- ber" local talent on Thursday
shops and even sensitivity train- nights, and weekend performanc-
ing labs. es by out-of-town professionals.
Five years ago, David, who was In addition, referral and coun-
then singing at the Ark, was seling services are available
recommended by Jim Feiker, on a "supportive" means with
then director of the coffeehouse, Ark leaders. Plans for the future
to take over its management. include rap sessions, between 16-
The idea of the Ark was ori- cal organizations and church
ginally conceived by Don Post- people, and an Art-Poetry Work-
ema of Campus Chapel and Mal- shop Night designed to help those
colm Brown of the First Pres- in the arts. It will be structured
byterian Church. Five local and taught by locally recognized
churches - Calvary Presbyter- poets and artists, according to
ian, Northside Presbyterian, First David.
Presbyterian, Campus Chapel, Decisions for running the Ark
and First Methodist - joined are now made by a Board com-
with volunteer workers and funds posed of the four affiliated
donated by concerned individ- churches and members from the
uals. The First Presbyterian community.
Church supplied nearly all of the Discussing their weekend eve-
money needed and also the pre- ning programs, David says t h a t
sent site of the house. All this there are great differences be-
occurred about eight years ago. tween the music played today
Churchgoes have found m a n y and the music played five years

*Royal
set
'Good show!'
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHES-
TRA, Rudolf Kempe conducting, with
Teiko Maehashi, violin. Saturday,.
Nov. 4, Hill Auditorium. Choral Union
Series of the University Musical So-
ciety. Second Essay for Orchestra,
Op. 17 - Barber; Concerto in D Mi-
nor, Op. 47, for Violin and Orchestra
- Sibelius; Symphony No. 6 in B
Minor, Op. 74 (Pathetique) -- Tchai-
kovsky.
By ROY CHERNUS
The Royal Philharmonic's per-
formance last Saturday was a
"good show" in the true British
spirit, fit for the Queen herself.
It was solid, well-disciplined, and
majestic both in the personality
of the selections and the manner
of Mr. Kempe's direction.
One could envision the mu-
sicians as lively schoolboys (per-
haps it is appropriate to mention
how young many of them were)
brought under control by their
master's dignified hand. It was
precisely* this authority, so per-
fectly wielded by Kempe, which
made possible exciting dynamic
and textural variances without
sacrificing the least amount of
spontaneity or e n t h u s i as m.
Kempe and the orchestra posses-
sed a rapport rarely found today
in such ensembles which clearly
showed in their impressive in-
terpretations of the program's
three works, which were inter-
esting examples of Romantic
music from different periods and
styles: contemporary romanti-
cism of mid 20th century Amer-
ica (Barber's Second Essay for
Orchestra), late romanticism of
early 20th century Finland (Sibe-
lius' Violin Concerto), and lyrical
romanticism of late 19th century
Russia (Tchaikovsky's Symphony
No. 6).
The Barber work was a tasty
hor d'oeuvre in the evening's re-
past; a musical essay of lively
inter-instrumental dialogues de-
veloped within a basically tradi-
tional tonal framework. The mu-
sic swelled and ebbed in intensity
through lyrical themes on the
stringsto brass fanfares and per-
cussion.
The superb performance of the
Sibelius Violin Concerto by solo-
ist Teiko Maehashi added an ex-

tra dimension to the evening. The
young and slight-built Maehashi
handled the passionate and de-
manding work like a seasoned
artist. She exploited its beauty
and nationalisticemotion fully,
demonstrating her own tremen-
dous capacity of expression
above and beyond her flawless
technique throughout. Kempe
kept the orchestra well-modulat-
ed to provide a subtly-textured
accompaniment not to compete
with the violin. Yet Maehashi
felt compelled to play nearly
the whole concerto in fortis-
simo; overdoing the very inten-
sity and passion which bene-
fitted many sections of the work.
The jocular and poignant pas-
sages suffered due to Maehashi's
forcing and tension. The only re-
spite to this emotional excess
were the orchestral comments.,
The work's last movement, how-
ever called for all the emotion
Maehashi could summon. Her
fervor produced a stunning cli-
max which roused the audience
to a standing ovation almost as
zealous as her performance.
I was anything but eager to
hear a work as overplayed as
Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6.
But in place of the common in-
distinguishable renditions of this
work was a splendid one, a sum-
mary ofnthe Royal Philharmon-
ic's strong points. At no point
were Kempe and the musibians
more unified as when they lov-
ingly fondled Tchaikovsky's
work. Their expression was ex-
quisite from the most sensitive
phrases to the almost unnerving
barrages. The true triumph of
Kempe's interpretation was no
only the overall excitement he
instilled in the musicians and the
work (particularly in the bar-
baric march of the third move-
ment), but his sensitive hand-
ling of the more lyrical sections
emphasizing their fluidity and
beauty without falling into the
unbearable and ruinous senti-
mentality of so many interpre-
tations.
(WABX Airwaves)-Rumor has
it that Bob Dylan is changing his
name back to Zimmerman and
moving to Israel as soon as the
Israeli government gives the OK
. . John and Yoko are moving
to San Francisco, if the U.S.
gives them permission to stay
in the country. They should know
before the month is over.

ago. "At that time, groups such
as the Limelighters and t i e
Kingston Trio were the really big
thing."
"When Linda and I became di-
rectors, he explained, we tried
to bring the music back to more
traditional folk music - of Wood-
ie Guthrie and Jimmy Rogers,
for example." "Ballads and tra-
ditional styles are still what we
seek in the talent we bring here
- fad styles are not for our aud-
iences."
He recalled that "sea shanties,"
with audience participation, were
very popular three years ago -
but interest has now declined; a
good example of the ups and
downs in folk music."
Co-director David says he's
disgusted in "the totally advertis-
ing-oriented campaigns to build
'images' of many popular groups,
which he sees as a pervasive
movement today.
"So much money and time is
spent in making that one big re-
cord 'promo' in hopes of making
a singer or group an instant suc-
cess - I think this is pure
hype."
The Ark, he stressed, relates
to artists on a very strong per-
sonal basis. "We don't deal with
record companies - and try to
stay far away from their influ-
ence. Our performers like the
informal, close atmosphere. We
don't use extra lights or other
special effects. The performer
is with the audience - and true
art comes only from this direct
communication."
. Above all, "the Ark tries to
gear itself toward achieving a
feeling of non-threatening warm-
th in an ever more uptight
world," David concluded.
Often the artists stay to talk
with the people and some even
have special sessions on sub-
jects they like to teach such as
David Bromberg'stsessions on
magic and Paul Geremia's creole
cooking lessons.
tov.
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 Eddie's aFther
50 Flintstones
56 Maggie and the Beautiful
Machine
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Making Things Grow
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News, Weather, Sports
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Zoom
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Family Classics
7 Wild Kingdom
9 News
50 Hogan's Heroes,
8:00 2 Carol Burnett
4 Adam-12
7 Paul Lynde
9 Pro Hockey
50 Dragnet
8:30 4 Madigan
7 Movie
"The Crooked Hearts"
50 Merv Griffin
56 Playhouse New York
9:00 2 Medical Center
10:00 2 Campaign '72
4 Search
7 Julie Andrews
50 Perry Mason
56 Soul!
10:30 9 AllOutdoors
11:00 2 4 7 9 News, Weather, Sports
50 Mancini Generation
11:20 9 Nightbeat
11:30 2 Movie
"The Bobo" (English, 196)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett
50 Movie
"The Last Challenge" (1967
12:00 9 Movie
"Any Second Now." (1969)
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"stand-in." (1937)

3:00 2 News
wcbn today
fm 89.5
9:00 Morning After Show
12:00 Progressive rock
4:00 Folk
7:30 This week in sports
8:00 Rhythm & Blues
11:00 Progressive Rock (runs until 3)
r ALLEN
LOVE
and the
ECSTATIC BLISS
AH-
217SASH j 2Rt-2AM

The School of Music presents two one-act operas
Puccini's SISTER ANGELICA
Ibert's ANGELIQ U E

SOPH SHOW'S

...

Sung in English
NOV. 17, 18, 20, and 21
8:00 P.M. Conductor: JOSEF BLATT
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT
TICKETS: $3.00 MAIL ORDERS:
Some reserved seating available at $1.50 for School of Music Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre,
University students with I.D. cards. Sold at Box The University of Michigan,
Office only. Ann Arbor, MI 48104
BOX OFFICE OPENS NOVEMBER 13 AT 12:30 P.M. INFORMATION: 764-6118
UAC-DAYSTA R presents
NOVEMBER 17

CABARET
is being presented
NOV. 9, 10 & 11
at
Power Center
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
at the
POWER CENTER BOX OFFICE

with SECTION
DANNY KORTCHMAR-RUSS KUNKLE
CRAIG DOERGE-LELARD SKLAR

FRIDAY, 8 P.M.
$3.50, $4.50, $5.50.
crisler arena
Reserve your seats today
at Michigan Union.
(You'll receive a receipt-
coup on which you ex-
change for a ticket when
they arrive from the print-
ers Nov. 14 )
OR BY MAIL-
Money Order to:
UAC-DAYSTAR
P.O. BOX 381
ANN ARBOR 48107
(sorry, no personal checks)
Coming: Dec. 9 Sat.
The Allman Brothers
and Dr. John

Do you use an
after shave just to
smell good?
If you thought after shave lotions were just to smell good,
that's only half the story. After shave lotions help heal nicks and
re-establish the skin's proper acid/alkali balance
after a shave. (Bet you didn't know that, did you?)
But smelling nice is, after all, the nicest thing
about finishing off a shave. So why not smell great? ~
English Leatherchas three ways to
accnomnlish this. Enalish Leather Reaular. Lime

5th
Dimension
Paul Williams
NOV. 10,8:00 P.M.
BOWEN FIELD HOUSE
EASTERN MICHIGAN U.
TICKETS: Reserved Seats-
$3.50 $4.50 $5.50
TICKET OUTLETS:

X:h: ra

I

i

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