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November 04, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-04

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Saturday, November 4, 1 972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page SEuem

Saturday, November 4, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven
U

ii

for people who
walk on the earth .. .

Will Dems lose control?

SENATE RACE
Candidates use ads

T h e speciaily engineered soIe
imitates wal ing on sand barefoot
and forces you to walk with good
posture reduces fatigue and the
a ches and pains caused by our
hard surfaced city. For men and
women in s h o e s. sandals and
sabots. From $22 to $36.

(Continued from Page 1)
portance to obtaining a totally
workable majority in Congress.
While some surrogate campaign-,
ers have stumped for Republi-
cans in local races, Nixon himself
has done no such campaigning.
According to Herbert Klein,
White House Director of Commun-
ications, Nixon's "No. 1 consid-
eration is the Presidential race."
Nixon has concentrated his small
personal campaign efforts on as-
suring his own re-election.
Klein has said that Nixon is not
willing to jeopardize his own elec-
tion chances by campaigning for
the sake of a Republican Con-
gress.
The left-right makeup of Con-:
gress seems likely to change lit-!
tle. The South seems likely to re-
main largely conservative, the on-
ly possible change being the re-
placement of a few Dixiecrats with
Republicans. Three House races

incre clib}-Comfortable
662-07 M
OPEN 10 AM.-6 PM.
302 N. FIFTH AVE.

in Mississippi, for example, could
go to Republicans for the first
time in years.
None of the Southern seats are
expected to ch 'nge ideologically.
Nationwide, this election does
feature sever 1 close'races, such
as New York's House free-for-all,
featuring Democrat Bella Abzug,
Liberal Priscilla Ryan and a host
of other candidates.
Locally, the race! for the local
House seat between U. S. Rep.
Marvin Esch, a Republican, and
State Rep. Marvin Stempien, a
Democrat, is nationally regarded
as being too close to predict.
An attempt seems to have been
made to defuse busing as an issue
in most Congressional races. Only
in a few Senate races, in Tennes-
see for example, does busing
cause a major split between the
candidates. Here in Michigan,
where anti-busing sentiment runs
high, both senatorial candidates
say they oppose cross-district bus-
ing.
E In at least one race, in Indiana
between incumbent Republican
Congressman Earl Landgrebe and
liberal Democratic university pro-
fessor Floyd Fithian, the student
vote will almost definitely be the
deciding factor.
Students may also to play a ma-
jor role in other races, many of
them in the college-dominated ci-
ties in California.
Toda( fy's staff:
News: Angela Balk, Jim
Burakoff, Linda Dreeben,
son

Continued from Page 1)
Griffin, of course, is known as
the strong anti-busing candidate
because of his support for anti-
busing legislation in the Senate,
while Kelley's position is not so
clear to the voters.
Kelley has denied Griffin's
charges that he supports busing,
but he has had to overcome the
effects of the "Kalamazoo Mani-
festo", a Democratic statement
supporting busing which Kelley
endorsed in October of last year.
Like most candidates, Kelley has
been feeling the pinch of a fund
shortage and so his campaign has
attempted to get "free" media
time by being newsworthy.
However, the Kelley staffers
have been frustrated by the me-
dia's preoccupation with the bus-
ing issue. As one Kelley staffer
put it, "When Frank talks about
the important issues like the war
and taxes nothing happens, but
as soon as he mentions busing, the
lights come on and the cameras
start rolling."
Kelley staffers hope that the pub-
lic will be susoicious of what they
consider the "highly staged" char-
acter of Griffin's television adver-
tising, with its professional ac-
tors and slick production.
Perhaps the most controversial
of Griffin's radio spots is one in
which he labels Kelley "The Sha-
dow" in reference to a statement

Kelly made that his votes would
be nearly identical to those of Sen.
Philip Hart (D.-Mich.). The infer-
ence is that Kelley would merely
be Hart's "shadow" in Washing-
ton.
In a recent eight-page newspaper
supplement Griffin asserted that
he was nobody's shadow, but that
he was independent and willing to
battle even President Nixon, as
when he opposed the nomination
of Clement Haynsworth for the
Supreme Court. The supplement
also stated the case for Griffin's
strength, praising his role in con-
vincing Nixon to repeal the seven
percent excise tax on automo-
biles.
So the question remains: will the
state's voters be more impressed
by "Michigan's Muscle" and his
Senate performance or by "The
Shadow's" record as state At-
torney General and his stand on
the issues?
Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

The Residential College Players
presents:
The House of Bernarda Alba
by:
FREDRICO GARCIA LORCA
8:00 P.M.
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
November 2, 3, 4, 1972

I

O'Brien, Bob
Sue Stephen-

Editorial Page: Lindsay Chaney, Bill Hee-
nan, David Yalowitz
Arts Page: Gloria Jane Smith
Photo Technician: David Margolick

T

rraerm , ww' ur

7i

I1

EDEN ( OODS
NATURAL FOODS
DELICATE SSEN
3COLD LURCHES

Harris,
Reniner
compete
(continued from Page1)
erally run in the neighborhood of
1,000 to 2,000 votes-not enough to
win, but enough to hurt Renner.
Renner remains confident that
traditional party voters will stay
with him, and cites healthy atten-
dance at party functions held in
his honor. Solid GOP support, and
at least a respectable showing on
campus are the keys to the Renner
strategy.
While no conclusive data has
been gathered, preliminary and
incomplete polls show Renner
trailing his Democratic and Human
Rights Party opponents by a con-
siderable margin.
TOMORROW: Bullard versus
Burghardt
Forest fires born
more than tres
F
"DID YOU KNOW that
Kathy FOJTIK was nominated
by over 200 voters in an open
primary where 1,400 votes were
cast?"
KATHY
Dist. 14 Commissioner
.Pd. Pot Adv.
'CH RISTMAS in
HAAI
$
DEC. 17-DEC. 24
Jet round trip Det.
First-DOss hotels at Waikik
Kah, Maui, and Hawaii
b Sightseeing and transfers
Nat'l Bank of Ypsilanti
TRAVEL BUREAU
S611 W. Cross, Ypsi 483-8556
Looking for a Kosher
Meal This Weekend?
TRY...
DELI
HOUSE
Best Corned Beef in Town
Franks Pop
Every Sunday-S p.m.
Hillel Social Hall
1428 Hill Payatdoor

II.-
Ii U

'4

I

WE'VE MOVED
to
330 MAYNARD
(behind
Nickels Arcade)

NOT SOUPS ROOM to
SIT & EAT & TALK
a

PLUS ALL OUR
REGULAR STAPLES
MANY MUNCHIESI!
COME VISITI
Mon -sat.10- 6

l

a 11:=:gL -- - m=IL

I

I

I

5

I

Olin
SAT./SUN.
The Sun of the Sheikdid
not arrive Instead we
are showing another
Rudolf Valentino folm:
BLOOD
AND SAND
Dir. FRED NIBLO. Silent
Plus: Chaplin Short:
EASY STREET
DONALD SOSIN at the piano
MONDAY
STEAMBOAT
BILL, JUNIOR
Dir. CHS. REISNER 1928
Buster Keaton appears
with ukulele, bell bottoms

-- --i--- -- + '4~1 >".

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