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November 03, 1972 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1972-11-03

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, .November 3, 11074

THE MICHiGAN DAILY 1-riday, November 3, 1~Y7L

Violence erupts as protesting
Indians demand more benefits

"DID YOU KNOW that a new
transportation package is in
committee in Lansing which
would provide funding for bike
paths and mass transit systems
in Washtenow County?"
KATHY
FOJTIK
Dist. 14 Commissioner
Pd. Pol. Adv.
Join The Daily

a pad politicaladvertsemet

GETTNG-OUT-F-RETAIL-B SINES IE

By the AP and Reuters
WASHINGTON - Several hun-
dred protesting American Indians
took over parts of the Bureau of
Indian Affairs (BIA) building last'
evening.
The demonstrators turned over,
desks, ripped tapes from compu-'
tors, smashed doors andtemptied
contents of. offices into the hall-
ways of the buildings.
Officials said that the protesters
did not threaten the BIA employes
in any way but told them to leave

immediately. ed churches.
The protesters, part of the week When the police came, shortly af-
long demonstration known as the ter most BIA employes had left for
Trail of Broken Treaties, had ar- the day, the Indians barricaded all
rived in Washington to demand entrances with desks taken from
that the government grant them offices.
further social and economic bene- "The police can't get in them-
fits. selves," said BIA spokesperson
The BIA press office saidpolice- Carl Shaw.
men had come to the building, ap- "They, the protestors, have con-
parently to attempt to oust the In- trol of the building," he said.
dians who had talked of staying He said the BIA press office was
there all night rather than move to barricading itself inside its glass
other accommodations in scatter- quarters.
Many of the protestors were

NONPARTISAN BALLOT * TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7

Wholesale prices fall
.5C- fa

members of the American Indian
Movement, a militant group which
demonstrated in the BIA build-

By the AF and Reuters
WASHINGTON - Average whole-a
sale prices fell 0.2 per cent last f
month, the first drop in 13 months,c
the Labor Department reported'
yesterday.
But after taking into account
normal declines in certain pricesa
at this time of the, year, the de-
partment said that on a seasonally
adjusted basis the wholesale price
index had risen 0.1 per cent, the
smallest increase since March.
In September the index rose 0.3.
per cent on both an adjusted and
unadjusted basis.
The main reason for the reduc-
tion was a 2.4 per cent drop in c
the price of farm products, t h e
largest since a similar decline in
September, 1971, with fresh fruits,
vegetables, grains and cottons all
down.
But food prices as a whole rose
0.9 per cent, mainly as a result of
seasonally adjusted advances for
meats, processed poultry, eggs and
dairy products.
Average prices of industrials such
as metals, textiles, fuels, lumber
and machinery rose .1 per cent,
but the bureau figured it a .1
per cent decline because it norm-
ally rises more in October.
Most economists view the price
behavior of industrials more sign-
ificant than farm products and
processed foods, which are sub-
ject to sharper fluctuations up or
down .from month to month.
The decline in the lasthmajor
price report before next Tuesday's
presidential election promptedthe
administration to predict that it
would reach its goal on reducing
inflation.
"the news on wholesale price
movements in October is excel-
lent," said Dr. Ezra Solomon of
Nixon's Council of Economic Ad-
visors.

ing nearly a year ago. Many were
He predicted Nixon would arrested then in agconfrontation
achieve his goal of reducing in- outside the BIA auditorium, while
flation to between 2.5 and 3 per attempting to make a citizen's ar-
cent by the end of this year. rest on Asst. BIA Commissioner
1"We are particularly pleased John Crow.
with the behavior of industrial The series of demonstrations be-
commodity prices," Solomon told1 gan with a brief, peaceful demon-
a nes coferece.stration in front of the White
~ nes coferece.House yesterday morning.
Wholesale prices in the past 11 The week's activities will a 1 s o
months of Nixon's Phase 2 wage- include conferences with govern-
price controls rose at an annual ment officials.
rate of 5.2 per cent, the same as in --------
the nine months just before Nix-
on's earlier 90-day wage-price
freeze, but Solomon said the in-
crease would have been march larg-
er if it were not for the economic
controls.

TRrEAT YOURSELF 4~
TO AN OLD FASHIONED BREAKFAST
Whole grain pancakes with pure maple syrup homemade.-
Yogurt with fresh fruit preserves. Hot apple cider, tea, or -
coffee.
all for only $1.00 Served 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Indian Summer Natural Foods Restaurant
315 S. STATE ST. 761-7918 '
,t,,se,$$ j.t $$sl$$®,' t- ' . j.A

BELL & HOWELL
PORTABLE CASSETTE RECOROERS
Originally $64 95 NOW $49.95
ALSO FURTHER REDUCTIONS ON
" Maxell 1" Open Reel Tapes
* Lee Quadrasonic Sound "Love Seat"
MEMOREX AND BASE TAPE-40% OFF!

0EL
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TAPE REOGEDE
SPEOIALISI
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OPEN FRIDAY 9-9 - SATURDAY 9-5:30
309 E. Liberty-UNDERGROUND Location

rs

.,

vdoyoujuge a 4L

nee

jmUPk.P I

Not by election eve rhetoric.
Not by literature designed for the'Studentlote'
but by what he has done.

I

-ELECT-
JEROME K.
FULTON
DEMOCRAT
WASHTENAW COUNTY
Drain Commissioner
Doctoral Candidate---
Natural Resources)
YOU CAN ELECT ONE U-M
STUDENT TO A COUNTY.-
WIDE OFFICE.
"WithEJerry Fulton, the
PEOPLE of Woshtenow
County will have a Drain
Commissioner."

Paid Political Advertisement

SPEAKING BEFORE THE ANN Al4BOR( CIAPTEJR OF
COMMON CAUIE, CONGRESSM AN ESC H'S OPPO-
NENT SUGGESTED T H AT HE WILL BRING ABOUT
CONGRESSIONAL REFORM BECAUSE IIE IS A MElM-
BER OF THE MA JORITA 'PARITY - -.
Congressman Esch was one of the earliest
leaders in what has now become a major
movement to reform the antiquated senior-
ity system. He was instrumental in changing
the rules so that his own party now elects
by secret ballot their ranking members
while the "Majority Party" still rely on the
seniority system to choose their Committee
Chairmen. He was a prime sponsor in the
first reform of campaign spending practices
in 47 years. He has worked to restore to
Congress its proper role in such crucial
areas as war-making powers, and has intro-
duced the major legislation dealing with
Congressionil fiscal responsibility.
ON NOVEMBER 7TH WE HOPE YOU WILL
VOTE ON THE BASIS OF THE MAN'S
RECORD RATHER THAN A LABEL

In his six years on the Court
of Appeals, Judge Charles
Levin's decisions have con-
sistently reflected a rare
combination of respect for
people, as they are today,
coupled with respect for the
basic values upon which our
country was founded.
We are not alone in our
judgment of this man. Judge
Levin is regarded by law
students, law professors and
lawyers as one of the out-
standing judicial scholars in
the country.
The Detroit Free Press, in
an October 17, 1972 editorial,
describes Judge Levin as
' unusually well qualified"'
4a scholar and a public servant
in his family's tradition.'
The Detroit News, in an
October 9, 1972 editorial, also
describesjudge Levin as
"a scholarly, objective and
concerned State Court of
Appeals Judge"
' an experienced judge who
runs on a record of achievement"
* "reflects the calm, non-
political approach the present
court so sorely needs.''
But don't take their word
for it. If you happen to know
a law student or a lawyer who
has read Judge Levin's
decisions ask him for his
opinion. If you have the time,
you may go to the library
and read some of judge
Levin's decisions for yourself.
All his decisions are printed
in the bound volumes of the
"Michigan Court of Appeals
Reports." Here are some
examnles:

Pre Trial Imprisonment
Until recently, some trial
judges circumvented the laws
designed to enable persons,
accused of traffic offenses and
other misdemeanors, to secure
release by posting reasonable
(minimal) bail. These judges
sent many accused, but un-
convicted, persons to jail
because of their inability to
obtain the funds necessary to
post bail bonds in higher
amounts. In 1970, Judge Levin
wrote an opinion overruling
such practices (Pressley v.
Lucas, 30 Mich App 300 (1970):
"All persons charged with a
traffic offense or a misdemeanor
are entitled to be released on
reasonable bail. It is not permis-
sible to deny bail, directly
or indirectly.
'The power to release on bail
came into being as a check on the
power to hold a citizen before
trial. In light of that history,
the judiciary should be slow to
superimpose requirements which
would impede the full implemen-
tation of legislation providing a
more equitable means of obtaining
release on bail.'
Pollution
In White Lake Improvement
Association v. City of Whitehall,
22 Mich App 262 (1970),
Judge Levin affirmed the
right of individuals to band
together to protect themselves
against private polluters and
polluting units of government:
"The fight against pollution
of natural resources has in recent
times become a cause celebre. Along
with the increasing recognition of
the importance of this effort,

"The most expedient way for
the riparian owners (the people
with cottages on White Lake) to
obtain a determination on the
merits is to allow them to combine
and join together for this purpose
with others of a like interest
under a single banner both before
and at the time of suit.'
Protecting the Rights
of "Illegitimate" Children
In re Mark T., 8 Mich App
122 (1967), quoted with
approval by .the Supreme Court
of the United States in Stanley
v. Illinois, 92 S. Ct. 1208
(1972), Judge Levin reasoned
through a confusing morass
of prior law and affirmed the
power of a court to award
custody of an "illegitimate"
child to the father where the
mother has relinquished to an
adoption agency her rights
to the child:
''The history of the treatment
of illegitimate children at common
law was one of singular inhu-
manity. The attitudes responsible
for a rule of law which protected
the English upper class from
those whom they exploited,
sexually as well as economically,
are no longer voiced. However,
new rationales have now developed
to continue outmoded rules of law.
"We are not aware of any
sociological data justifying the
assumption that an illegitimate
child reared by his natural father
is less likely to receive a proper
upbringing than one reared by his
natural father who was at one
time married to his mother, or
that the stigma of illegitimacy
is so pervasive it requires adoption
by stran er s and Permanent ter-

"In the vigorous representation
of his client's interests, the
lawyer's duty may require that
he 'resist the wishes of the judge
on some matters, and though his
resistance shlould never lead him'
to act disrespectfully, it may
require him to appear unyielding
and uncooperative at times. In
so doing, he does not contradict
his duty to the administration of
justice but fulfills his function
within the adversary system'.
"A litigant's lawyer has as
much right to be in the courtroom
as the judge, and as much right
to be heard."

* Judge, Court of Appeals,
Since 1966
" Member, Michigan Law
Revision Commission (1966)
" Currently:
Chairman, State Bar of
Michigan Special Committee
On Prisons and Corrections
Chairman, Marygrove College
Board of Trustees
M-mhe-r A merican L aw

I

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