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November 03, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-03

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Friday; November 3, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, November 3, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PaaeTh..

1.

FACU LTY-G RA D
GET-IT-TOGETH ER
"The Scene may no
Kosher Manisch
BUT-Join those
SUNDAY, NOV. 5
8 p.m.

t serve
ewitz
who dr

SHE
ink it!"
Scene
S. Main

I

Dinner at Ei
Cinema.Guild
Fri.
George Cukor's 1933
tion of George S. Kau
Edna Ferber's Dinner
features a star - stud
(Lionel Barrymore, Jo
more, Marie Dressler,
low, Billie Burke, Wa
Beery), a diverse v
characterizations, and
moving narrative depi
events leading up to a
ing dinner party.
-MATTHEW

ight
d
3 produc-
fman and
dat Eight
dded cast

cinemca

Weekend

The
341

JiTCIRCULATION DEPT.
Come in any afternoon
420 Maynard
CINEMA I PRESEN TS **
FRIDAY 3 NOVEMBER

Blood and S
Cinema Guild
Sat. & Sun.
Fred Niblo (directo
1927 Ben Hur shown a
Guild earlier thiss
made this silent roma
bullfighter (Rudolph V
and his glamorous,
wife. The film was r
1941 with Tyrone Powe
Sosin will be providing
background for Valenti
making, and that alon
be worth the trip.
Borsalino
Cinema II
Fri. & Sun.
With picture-perfect

hn Barry- ing and nit-picking decorative
Jean Har- detail, Borsalino is more of a
a 1 1 a c e museum piece than a movie.
ariety of Jacques Dersay directs as if the
1 a fast cinematic portrait of the gang-
icting the ster as a young man is an en-
fascinat- dangered species which must be
preserved, even if that involves
GERSON draining it of vital fluids and
posing it like a stuffed animal in
and a showcase. It is a loving, me-
ticulous reproduction, but not a
dynamic entity; so that the vio-
lence seems dull and the chase
scenes like instant replays of
rt Cinema things you've seen a million
itmCinema times before.
semester)
nce of a The plot is one of those exer-
Valentino) cises in criminal daredeviledry
unfaithful that Edward G. Robinson and
emade in James Cagney familiarized for
r. Donald movie fans decades ago. Two
g a piano cigar-gnawing punks, (Alain De-
no's love- lon and Jean - Paul Belmondo)
ne should rise to the top of the 1930's Mar-
seilles underworld through a
-STAFF combination of ambition and
luck. Handling the machine
guns and the ladies with equal
skill and lazy charm, the part-
ners survive everything that
celluloid gangsters usually get
costum- thrown at them, and wake up one

BORSALINO

Director James Deray

Belmondo and Alain Delon starring in this French gangster caper
set in the Roaring Twenties.
SATURDAY 4 NOMEMBER - DR. STRANGELOVE
See Tomorrow's Daily for revised Cinema II schedule.
AUDITORIUM A 7 & 9 o'clock $1.00
-
DANCING
8 P.M.-2 A.M. EVERY NIGHT

morning as the sole controllers
of Marseilles' gambling, prosti-
tution, and wholesale meat and
fish. Predictably, success turns
to ashes and the final winner
is the mortician.
Unfortunately, he comes too
late for Delon, who acts like a
stiff throughout most of the mo-
vie. Belmondo at least has the
grace to look embarrassed in
his role as a 1930's clotheshorse.
(Certainly the plot is the only
threadbare thing in sight; every-
one zips through costume chan-
ges like Sherman through Geor-
gia.)
Admittedly antiques h a v e
charm. Even jazzed-up, faked
antiques have a faint and wist-
ful appeal all their own. Borsa-
lino is no exception. But lov-
ingly etched wax effigies belong
in Mme. Tussaud's, not on the
screen.
-TERRY MARTIN
Dr. Strangelove
Cinema II
Sat. & Sun.
Stanley Kubrick made Dr.
Strangelove as a forceful reac-
tion to people's virtually listless
acquiescence in the face of the
possibility of nuclear destruc-
tion. The film was made to sound
an alert, but it is not a siren
so much as a subtly-put-together
black comic farce on collective
madness.
The acting of Peter Sellers (as
President Muffley) and George
C. Scott are caricatures of, re-
spectively ineffectuality and
the "Pentagon hawk." The ab-
surd summit meeting in Wash-
ington sets the scene for the ap-
pearance of the prophet of doom
himself, Strangelove, also play-
ed by Sellers. An uncomfortable
portrait of Werner Van Braun,
Strangelove is the scientist who
has defected but still has a soft
snot in his hear for the Fueh-
rer. His black-gloved right hand
makes several attempts to choke
himself, as the fearful war inside
him mocks the generative urge
in man to destroy himself.
-BRUCE SHLAIN
Reefer Madness
Modern Languages Bldg.
Fri., Sat.
In the late 1930's, few people

recognized marijuana as the
brain - breaking, death - dealing
maker of maniacs that now we
all know it to be a group of con-
cerned, apparently serious citi-
zens set out to transmit these
little - known truths to the
American public; they vividly
portrayed the marijuana mon-
ster in a filmed tale of death and
ruin, all brought on by the evil
weed.
The nationwide campaign that
generated (Reefer Madness, then.
entitled something more like
What to Tell Your Children
About Marijuana) succeeded in
illegalizing grass. So view the
film as an historical document,
a study in propaganda, an un-
fortunate barrel of images still
held by many Americans. Or if
you want to be more in tune
with the rest of the audience,
ingest some of the wicked weed
yourself and go to laugh at the
lies.
If you do the latter, you're
likely to enjoy the accompanying
short feature by the Firesign
Theater, Martian Space Party.
-LARRY LEMPERT
Farewell Uncle Tom
Fifth Forum
Yup, you guessed it-another
movie ripoff about the Black
Experience. And this Farewell
Uncle Tom even purports to be
an "historically documented" ac-
count of the evils of slavery, al-
though it is really just a series
of unrelated episodes reenacted
to simulate documentary form-
all of it written, directed, and
produced by those two Italian
guys who made Mondo Cane a
few years back. We see the same
old tired stereotypes - Blacks
as innocents, sex objects, or cat-
tle; Whites as tyrants, lechers,
or killers - with the slight dif-
ference that the sex and vio-
lence are a little more graphic,
hence the "X" rating (if you
can't draw the Blacks, try for
the voyeurs). The narration is
done in a garbled Italian accent
and is difficult to understand,
the photography is too cute, and
the characterization is atrocious.
The theme music I liked.
Actually, this is not a Black
movie at all, but, rather, a mo-
vie for those white people who
feel some masochistic need to re-

mind themselves periodically of
just how awful things were for
black people.
If you are thus inclined, take
whip in hand and go see this mo-
vie. Whom you whip is your
own business.
--WILLIAM MITCHELL
A Separate Peace
Michigan
In the sappy tradition of Love
Story and Summer of '42 comes
the very, very sappy A Separate
Peace. No, I haven't read
Knowles' very popular novel (a
dubious distinction of mine, yet
a distinction nevertheless), but
whatever worth the book had has
been drowned in an oozy sea of
cinematic syrup. What must have
been a fragile study of the friend-
ship of two students at Devon
prep school has been brutalized
by vastly inadequate perform-

C. Scott was doing in this medio-
cre film in the first place.
--RAYMOND WILLEY
Everything You Always
Wanted to Know About
Sex-But Were
Afraid to Ask
Campus
Legend has it that Woody Al-
len first conceived of filming
Sex while watching Dr. Reuben
on a late talk show. A great
idea, but how do you go about
realizing it? Allen simuply de-
cided to compile six skits as
answers to various Reubenesque
questions: "What is sodomy?"
"Do aphrodisiacs work?" "What
are sex perverts?" etc., etc., etc.
The various conceptions of the
skits are often tremendously
clever, but once again the prob-
lem of execution presents itself.
Take the "What is Sodomy" epi-
sode. The idea of Gene Wilder
falling in love with a sheep
strikes me as a very funny one.
But the actual episode isn't much
more than one of those imitation
Love Story Seven - Up commer-
cials stretched out for fifteen

_A

to

0

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Bridge with Jean Cox
6:39 2 4 7 News
9 Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Book Beat
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News, Weather, Sports
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
56 I Love Lucy
50 1; Love Lucy
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Hollywood squares
7 Wait Till Your Father
Gets Home
9 Lassie
56 Wall Street Week
50 Hogan's Heroes

8:00 2 Sonny and Cher Comedy
Hour
4 Sanford and Son
7 Brady Bunch
9 Amazing World of Kreskin
56 Washington Week in Review
50 Dragnet
8:30 4 Little People
7 Partridge Family
9 Pig 'N' Whistle
59 Merv Griffin
56 Off the Record
9:00 2 Movie
Concludes "The Dirty Dozen."
4 Ghost Story
7 Room 222
9 News
56 NET Journal
9:30 7 Odd Couple
9 Woods and Wheels
10:00 4 Banyon
7 Love, American Style
9 Tommy Hunter
50 Perry Mason
56 High School Football
10:30 2 Political Talk
11:00 2 4 7 9 News, Weather, sports
50 Rolin'
11:20 9 Nightbeat
11:30 2 Movie--Dfama
"The Chapman Report." (1962)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett
50 Movie
Prehistoric monsters in "The
Valley of Gwangi." (1969)
12:00 9 Movie
"Eye of the Cat." (1969)
1:00 4 News
7 Movie
"Circle of Deception." (1960)
1:30 2 Movie
"The Vanquished." (1953)
3:00 2 7 News

p j I

z

DRAF

ARTS

T BEER and PIZZA
FROM 5:00 P.M.
341 South Main Ann Arbor 769-5960

r

I

FRIDAY
DINNER
AT EIGHT
Dir. George Cukor 1933
The greatest s t a r s of
Hollywood are giving you
a party: Marie Dressler,
J o h n Barrymore, Lionel
Barrymore, Wallace
Berry, Jean Harlow, Billy
Burke.

wcbn today CULTURE CA\p8\.5
fm 89.5 ________________

9:00
12:00
4:00
7:30
11:00

Morning After Show
Progressive rock
Folk
Rhythm & Blues
Oldies show (runs until 3)

Prizewinning s c r i p t
Edna Ferber & George
Kaufman.
*"

by
S.

RE-ELECT
SYLVESTER A.'
LEONARD
COUNTY TREASURERI
HONEST-TRUSTWORTHY
QUALIFIED BY EXPERIENCE
25 YEARS AS PUBLIC OFFICIAL
10 YEARS COUNTY TREASURER;
10 YRS. COUNTY SUPERVISOR
5 YRS. LINCOLN SCHOOL
BOARD
Republican
t . Pd. Pol. Adv.

" I

SAT. SUN.
Change in Program
Blood and Sand
With Rudolf Valentino
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

I

DRAMA-PTP presents the Phoenix Repertory Company
prior to Broadway in two productions in Power Center
this weekend. Moliere's Don Juan, directed by Stephen
Porter will be presented at 3 and 8 Saturday. Eugene
O'Neill's The Great God Brown, directed by Harold
Prince will be presented at 3 and 8 on Sunday. Tickets
are available at the Mendelssohn Box Office.
DRAMA-The Residential College's production of Lorca's
The House of Bernarda Alba continues at the RC Audi-
torium tonight.
MUSIC-Paul Siebel performs tonight at the Ark. at 9. Also,
the People's Ballroom presents Deliverance and Hydra-
mosz tonight at 8.
DANCE-University Musical Society presents the Batsheva
Dance Company from Israel at the Power Center tonight
at 8; international folk dance tonight at Barbour Gym,
8-11.
WEEKEND BARS AND MUSIC-Blind Pig, Garfield Blues
Band (Fri., Sat.) cover, classical music (Sun.) no cover;
Golden Falcon, First Concept (Fri., Sat.) cover; Mr.
Flood's Party, Diesel Smoke and Dangerous Curves (Fri.,
Sat.) cover; Odyssey, TNT (Fri., Sat.) cover Jam Night
(Sun.) no cover; Pretzel Bell, RFD Boys (Fri., Sat.)
cover; Rubaiyat, Iris Bell Adventure (Fri., Sat., Sun.)
no cover; Bimbo's on the Hill, Long John Silver (Fri.,
Sat.) cover; Del Rio, Armando's Jazz Group (Sun.) no
cover; Bimbo's, Gaslighters (Fri., Sat., Sun.) cover;
Mackinac Jack's, Radio King and the Court of Rhy-
thm (Fri., Sat.) cover, Okra (Sun.) cover.
The Residential College Players
presents:
The House of Bernarda Alba
by:
FREDRICO GARCIA LORCA
8:00 P.m.
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
November 2, 3, 4, 1972

ances by an unimpressive group
of new faces, by Larry Peerce's
precocious direction, by a filmic
style that could serve as a veri-
table textbook of visual cliches.
Add one more body to the corpse
heap of mutilated "filmed liter-
ature."
-RICHARD GLATZER
Fiddler on the Roof
State
Norman Jewison's Fiddler pre-
sents us with a seemingly anti-
quated world of hard-working,
simple peasantry. But the film
achieves - in the wistful and
happy, yet moving and poignant
tale of life struggles and quests
-a universal story of man's exis-
tence.
Israeli actor Topol plays a
virile, tough Tevye, ever wise
and down to earth, yet full of in-
sight, packed with heart. He
highly values his daughters'
wishes, breaking his people's
precious Tradition by allowing
his kin to marry whom they
choose.
The music, the dancing, Tevye's
"If I Were a Rich Man," the
moving staging of "Sunrise,
Sunset," an excellent cast, all
serve to etch in one's mind the
emotions, humor, and philosophy
of the Jewish people - a peo-
ple struggling to, "Play a pret-
ty simple tune without breaking
(one's) neck."
-MATTHEW GERSON
The New Centurions
Fox Village
The New Centurions begins as
a feature length Adam-12 with a
few nifty chase scenes to its
credit. But director Richard
Fleischer and scenarist Sterling
Silliphant fail to give the movie
the depth necessary to really ex-
amine its subject: cop as an in-
dividual against society. As the
plot develops, two patrolmen -
Andy (George C. Scott), a pa-
trolman due to retire in one
year, and Roy (Stacy Keach), his
youthful partner - are plagued
with a variety of plausible mis-
fortunes. All of which soon be-
comeunconvincingly complicat-
ed, however.
Roy undergoes a metamor-
phosis that Kafka would admire.
And Andy, after retiring f r o m
the police force, decides to take
a powder and commit suicide.
One wonders just what George
1I
rA

minutes.
Then too, Allen seems I e s s
comically sure of himself when
he's being self-consciously dirty.
Unfunny puns and double enten-
dres abound, most of the skits
just trail off towards the end,
and some of the humor is almost
kinky.
Even so, Sex is a very funny
movie. It features. a monstrous
tit that roams the countryside
nursing people to death; a great
satire of Antonioni ("Why do
some women have troubles reach-
ing orgasm?") replete w i t h
Woody in shades and continental
clothes, sultry Louise Lasser in
a blonde wig, and Italian dialo-
gue; Lou Jacobi as a transves-
tite; What's My Perversion, with
Jack Berry and M. C. and Robert
Q. Lewis and Pamela Mason
among the panel members: a
final episode in which Allen
plays a sperm about to be ejacu-
lated; and many, many other
fantastic delights that no Woody
Allen fan will want to live with-
out.
-RICHARD GLATZER
Alice's Restaurant
Campus
Arthur Penn's uncanny knack
for feeling the pulse of our coun-
try is a well-known one; he is
unrivaled in being able to detect,
analyze, and then cinematize
national consciousness, national
movements and events, national
optimism and depression. Take
.Alice's Restaurant. Penn's fine
film is a faithful and funny
adaption of Arlo Guthrie's mu-
sical saga. But the movie's also
a lot more - a sympathetic de-
piction of people trying to
achieve a true sense of com-
munity, a melancholic chronicle
of their inevitable failure.
-STAFF
Not to Mention ...
Rhett andtScarlett are back;
Gone With the Wind is at the
Wayside this week. (See it on
the bid screen - only $.75 for
the Wednesday matinee.) Anoth-
er bargain: The Groundstar
Conspiracy, a critically well-re-
ceived thriller, is the Fifth For-
um's cheapy offering: $.75 for
Sat. and Sun. Matinee, $.99 for
Fri. and Sat. Late Show. The
uncut King Kong is being shown
Fri. and Sat. at the Modern Lan-
guageBuilding. Couzens is show-
ing The Fall of the House of
Usher and The Sign of Zorro.
And finally, Bursley is showing
Lovers and Other Strangers
Sat.
-STAFF
IfRADIO KING
cour * r-wIIvN
AND WE,
217SAS 2P?&-2AM
BRIGHTON CINEMA 3
1-96 and Grand River-227-6144
CINEMA I -
Dr. Zhivago
CINEMA ti-
A Separate Peace
PG

7&9 p.m.

75c

I

UAC-DAYSTAR presents

JAMES

Iunhurnrn i17

TAYLOR FRIDAY 8 P.M.
with SECTION
$3.50 $4.50 $5.50
crisler arena

Friday, 8 & 10 p.m.-Nat. Sci. Aud.-75c
Presented by McGovern -Shriver Committee

-

* The *
* STAR *
LOUNGE 4

proudly
announces
appearances
by

Reserve your seats
today at Michigan
Union. (You'll re-
ceive a receipt-cou-
pon which you ex-
change for a ticket
when t h e y arrive
from the printers)

TO
an(
bey
z 'N Yo
., rea

"THE ATHENIANS"

I

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I

v?;'._ .. AU. P. f4" aa. i ;sd':4A n n W &

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0 raul bebel is te one: *

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