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October 29, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-29

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Sunday, October 29, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

hyM

Might M
bumbling

ichigan humbles
Gophers, 42-0

By SANDI GENIS E V E N SCHEMBECHLER was rushing. As Schembechler com-'
Bo Schembechler made it out of forced to agree. "I'd say Franklin mented, "I like to pass, but the
the Wolverine fans' doghouse yes- gets better every week. He's a run is important. I'd hate to play
terday afternoon as the Michigan pretty good quarterback." Dennis Franklin and not worry
team rolled to their seventh con- Led by the tough passer, the about the pass or option, or play 01
secutive win of the season, club- receiving corps rolled up a season to the outside and have to worry
bing the Golden Gophers of Min- high 111 yards as Franklin com-! about Shuttlesworth in the middle."
nesota, 420. pleted five of his eight attempts The Minnesota squad learned
More important to Michigan fans' and set up four of the Wolverines' very quickly, however, that they
hearts than the lopsided score, Bo's five offensive scores. would have to worry about both as NIGHT EDITORS BOB McGINN and ROGER ROSSITER
tematuddtecodo oethe Wolverines took their first NGTEIOS O cINadRGRRSIE
team astounded the crowd of some However, in true Schembechler punt and promptly marched in
85;000 fans with an aerial attack form, the run was hardly aban- eight plays to their first score,
that until last weekend seemed only doned as fullback Ed Shuttlesworth behind the running of tailback b
a grid fans pipedream. But sopho- and company racked up 245 yards Chuck Heater and Shuttlesworth back slipped from the one for Two series earlier, however, the
more quarterback Dennis Franklin on the waterlogged Tartan turf. who went in from the one. ' his last tally. Wolvernes, who unlike the Goph-
made believers of them all with Shuttlesworth, in fact, tumbled A mere five plays later, the GEANWHILE, THE G o d e n ers, were not to be frustrated i
his second straight fine passing over the goal line for four scores Golden Gophers felt the bite of the Gophers, sporting new uniforms their errorless play, ran over the
performance, this time before an in his three quarters of play, Wolverine again as defensive back and a new no-huddle offense, look Gopher defense one final time as
appreciative hometown crowd, and carrying the ball 19 times for 86 Roy Burks intercepted a Bob Mor- ed a bit tarished despite comg Franklin, in his final appearance
prodded Gopher mentor- Cal Stoll 1rd off a surprisingly strong 43-14 of the afternoon, rifled a perfect
y gan pass intended for Doug Kings- trampling of Iowa last Saturday. 25 yard pass to Seal who managed
to call him the finest passer his Franklin, meanwhile, balanced riter and returned it to Minnesota's Admittedly the Wolverine defense to make the reception despite a
hardpressed team has seen all sea- his aerial prowess with 58 hard- 39 yard line. Franklin then engi- doesn't ordinarily allow their op- Gopher defender attached to his
son. earned yards and one touchdown neered the second score of the ponents to look good, but the Goph- back, and then sprinted around
first quarter with a 14 yard p ass ers looked genuinely pitiful in their left end to the one foot mark from

-T The Alter Ego
Ii
FI ait 'til next year,
_____________'Easy Ed'
--Bill Alterman
THERE BUT FOR the grace of God went Ron Johnson's single
game scoring record-or at least that is what Bo Schembech-
ler would have us believe. For after yesterday's walkover,
Schembechler piously revealed that he had no idea how many
times Ed Shuttlesworth had scored.
"I knew he had scored a couple, he admitted, "but I
didn't know how many. In any event touchdowns are the lousiest
statistic you can put up, it doesn't mean anything. I don't know
who scores."
Which is probably true, implying that late in the third
quarter, when Michigan was perched on the Minnesota one,
it was only fate as quarterback Dennis Franklin faked to
'Easy Ed" and kept it himself for the score. Had the 227
pound junior fullback from Cincinnati taken the ball with
him, he would have tied the Michigan, and modern Big Ten
record for most touchdowns in a single game
But for the romantics, it's probably just as well Shuttles-
worth didn't make it. Had he done so, he woud have tied the
record set by Johnson on Nov. 16, 1968 in one of the most
incredible single game performances in history. On that day, in
the mud and rain of Michigan Stadium, Johnson rushed for a
record 347, yards to singlehandedly destroy Wisconsin, 34-9.
But yesterday's performance by "Easy Ed" was just one
cog in a near-perfect machine. The Wolverines first touchdown
drive was a model of efficiency. Shuttlesworth and tailback
Chuck Heater alternated for the first six carrier, moving it down
to the Gopher nine from midfield. From there Franklin rolled
right to the one and Shuttlesworth took it in.
And that's how it went on all of the Wolverine's jaunts.
Some tough running, interspersed with one or two pinpoint
passes from Franklin, and the Wolverines would find them-
selves down inside the Gopher five. And in the Michigan
Machine it is Ed Shuttlesworth's assignment to get those last
few yards, just as it was Garvie Craw's job three years ago
and Fritz Seyferth's the year after that.
So no one was surprised when after the game the big full-
back, in true Schembeckian fashion, talked of team goals and
how "we consider it a good game if we get 35 points offensively."
But even Shuttlesworth couldn't hide a wide grin when asked
what it felt like to score four times: "Man, anytime you make
four touchdowns you've got to be thrilled," he beamed. And Ed,
for one, was not worrying about any records, "I'm not done yet,
I've still got a year and a half to play."
Meanwhile Gopher Coach Cal Stoll was reserving his praise,
for Franklin, whom he called "the best quarterback we've seen
r this year." Franklin hit five of eight for 94 yards and, in the
words of Bo, "wouldn't you say he's getting better every week."
Barring injury, Franklin has two and a half years left as
Michigan's signal-caller, which after last season's quarterbacking
debacle, has made a happy man of Bo Schembechler.
The Wolverine mentor has been able to diversify his attack
this year. "We're more consistent," he exclaimed. "We have
more ways to move the ball, but basically we're still a running
team, don't get me wrong though, I like to pass,"
Indeed, Michigan even tried some razzle-dazzle (or a
reasonable facsimile thereof) in the third quarter when
Franklin attempted to hit Gil Chapman with a screen pass.
Of course, Bo was later heard to mumble something about
"getting too darn fancy. Chapman (who was smeared on the
play) will never forgive me for calling that one."
If it sounds like Schembechler was content-he was. Before
the start of the season everyone was moaning how the Wolverines
wouldn't be the same without the sterling class of '72. Well,
they're not. They're better.
Michigan's team this year has far better balance than any
team in recent years. Offensively the Wolverines are showing
more and more each game, while the defense has surprised
everyone by racking up three shutouts to date, leading the
nation in fewest points allowed.
Assuming Minnesota ever had a chance in yesterday's
game, they blew it when they revealed their no-huddle offense
against Iowa last week and blitzed them 43-14. Schembechler
was happy the Gophers couldn't wait a week. "A week ago
that might have disrupted us. But after a week of practice
it wasn't so bad. I'm glad they did it against Iowa." For
yesterday's game the Wolverine defense simply audibled their
calls at the line, just as the Gophers were doing.
Stoll apparently wasn't trying to prove anything yesterday
with the no-huddle.' "We didn't do it for any particular reason.
We just don't need to huddle."
Naturally the Minnesota coach was asked to compare Michi-
gan with two previous opponents, Nebraska and Colorado, and
naturally he said, "I can't make any comparisons, they're all
good football teams." He did, however, admit that "Michigan
has lots of good football players . . . strength and quickness is
the key to Michigan's defense. They're too quick for us. We

can't handle them."
The question is, can anybody handle them? "This is a
good ball club," Schembechler remarked. "These kids are

to tight endPaul Seal to oring the efforts to get the ball into scoring which he galloped in on the next
ball to the four. Shuttlesworth then ran ase rrnrs nntinuallv thwart- nlav.

.I1

plunged up the middle, behind a
crushing block by Clint Haseirig,
for his second tally..
ONLY MINUTES LATER "Easy
Ed" picked up his third TD of the
afternoon and his tenth tally of
the season in an instant replay of
the earlier series as safety Dave
Brown snatched a second errant'
Morgan pass to give Michigan pos-
session at the Gopher 34.
Again the Wolverines pushed
down the field behind the rushing
of Shuttlesworth, H e a t e r and
Franklin; again Franklin set up
the score with an aerial, this time
a 15 yarder to split end *Gil Chap-
man at the four before Shuttles-
worth's touchdown ramble.
Mercifully, for the Gophers the,

Z iQ lss -,J QJ Gll VLJ %,VIA Lill U Qlly 411YYGi1l ! Flu J'.

eU LeL.
BULLETIN
DETROIT UP)-Earl Lloyd was
released last night as Detroit
Pistons coach and replaced by
his former assistant Ray Scott,
who was named team assistant
coach and scout before the sea-3
son began, according to the De-
troit Free Press.

Appropriately enough, when the
final gun went off, the frustration
was complete for the Gophers as
Walt Sexton sacked Morgan for
an 11 yard loss on the final play
of the afternoon and the triumph
was complete for the Wolverines
and their pass-mad fans, as they
walked off with the Little Brown
Jug again.

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
DYNAMIC DENNIS FRANKLIN (9) turns the corner and heads upfield yesterday on his way to an-
other substantial advance. The Massillon, Ohio native turned in a masterful performance, running for
58 yards and passing for 94 more. Michigan fans are beginning to realize that this poised sophomore
has unlimited potential.

Theisecond half was hardly more
lucrative for them as the Wolver-
ine defense displayed the awesome
power that made it the nation's
leader in defense against scoring.
In their first drive of the second
half the Gophers looked like they

LOWLY IOWA TIES MSU

IIHinllabc

edge-

Wolverines were stymied for most might be heading for paydirt only
of the second period, but with min- to have Brown pick off his second
utes to go before the damp, but pass of the afternoon at Michigan's
enthusiastic crowd turned their at- '35 and race 65 yards for another By The Associated Press
tention from the Little Brown Jug Michigan score, permanently cap- MADISON -- quarterbacx Greg
to their own little bottles and jugs turing the ball for his father's Hare amassed 238 yards total of-
of assorted spirits the Michigan trophy case. fense and sophomore fullback Har-
offense switched into high gear Much later, when the Gophers old Henson ran for 122 yards and
again. threatened on the 29, the defense two touchdowns yesterday pow-
In a drive that saw Franklin stiffened again as Fred Grambau ering fourth-ranked Ohio State to a
complete passes of 16 and 24 yards and Spearman caught Morgan for 28-20 Big Ten football victory over
interspersed with Shuttlesworth's two consecutive losses, followed by Wisconsin.
powerful running the Wolverines still another interception, this time The Buckeyes marched 77, 50,
struck once more as the big full- by Randy Logan. 87 and 70 yards touchdowns the
r first four times they had the ball,
1- -twice after Wisconsin fumbles. in

rt0

-0.110- M.

i,

Big Ten Stondi

Ba dge rs.'
er midway in the third period.
That punt return was the longest
in the Big Ten so far this season.
S Illinois rolled up 174 yards rush-
ing and 204 yards passing against
All Games the defense that went into the
A W L T PF PA game as the Big- Ten's best. Pur-
7 7 0 0 194 30 due rushed for 172 yards but gain-
34 6 0 0 183 66 ed only 73 through the air and only
17 4 3 0 158 91 119 yards total offense in the sec-
30 2 4 1 99 88 ond half.

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Purdue
Michigan State
Indiana
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
Northwestern
Illinois

W
4
4'
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
0

Big
LT
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
2 0
3 0.
3 0
3 1
4 0
4 0

Ten
PF
90
119
109
61
81
48
69
43
49
28

P

i -v, txo ptters ototy( away)

MICHIGAN
RUSHING

RECEIVING '

no yds td long
2 16 0 11

Franklin
Shuttiesworth
Heater
Haslerig
Banks
Gustafson
Thornbladh
Cipa
Slade
Totals

att
9
19
9
4
6
2
2
1
54

gain
74
86
27
33
19
3
7
12
5
266

loss
16
0
0
2
0
3
0
0
0

net
58
86
27
31
19
0
7
12
5

Fahnhorst
Kingsriter
King
Kephart
Totals

rolling to a 28-7 halftime lead on
route to their sixth victory in as
'many starts.
Wisconsin, capitalizing on two
Buckeye fumbles, scored in the
third period on a 15-yard touch-
down pass from Rudy Steiner to
Jack Novak.

97,
106
111
107
102
101

'4
3
1
2
2
0

3 0
4 0
6 0
4 1
5 0
7 0

154
117
103
72
76
67

164
147
232
131
161
225

1 7
1 3
1 13
5 39

A
0
0
0

7;
3
13
13

PUNTING

* * *

.

Randall

PASSING

Franklin
Cipa
Totals

att
8
4
12

comp
5
1
6

21 245 TOTAL FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
int yds 'NET YARDS GAINED
t y4d; RUSHING
0 94 Number of rushes
1 17
1 111 NET YARDS GAINED'
PASSING
Number attempted
INumber completed
td long Number intercepted
0 25 TOTAL PLAYS (rushes
0 i51and passes)
0 16' TOTAL NET YARDS
0 24 ,GAINED

RECEIVING

Seal
Chapman
Heater
Rather
DenBoer
Totals
Dotzauer

no yds
2 39
1 15
1 16

.1
I
6
PUNTING

24
17
111

0
0

17
25

no yds ave
5 174 34.8

King
Beaudoin
Morgan
Keller
Lawing
Kingsriter
Waltower
Totals

MINNESOTA
RUSHING
att
19
'16
14
9
2
4
1
57

gain
78
61
41
9
3
3
203

loss
0
0
21
0
21
0
0
42

net
78
61
20
9
-18
8
3
161
yds
23
16
39

KICK RETURN YARDAG
Punt returns number,
yards
Kickoff returns numbe
yards
PUNTS
Number of punts
Average yards
FUMBLES (No./Lost)
INTERCEPTIONS (Numb
Yards)
PENALTIES (Number/
Yards
SCORING SUMMARY
Touchdowns
Conversions (1 point/
2 points)
Field Goals (Number/
Attempted
Safeties
Score By Quarters:
MICHIGAN

no yds ave T F Y7alU
6 220 36.7 B
Mich Minn!
17 14 Steiner, an Iron Mountain,
12 12 Michigannative, passed the Bad-
gers on a 68-yard march and
245 161 scored himself from a yard out
54 57 with 1:52 to play, but a pass for
111 39 a two-point conversion fell . in-
12 13 complete.
6 5cWisconsin's f i r s t touchdown
1 4 came on a 12-yard pass from
66 70 Steiner to Novak in the second
36 7 quarter after Ohio State had takent
356 200 a 21-O lead. Hensen scored twice'
E 52 103 from a yard out for a season totalI
5-52 1-6 of 13 touchdowns, four behind the
school record shared by ,John,
0-0 6-101 Brockington and Jim Otis.
5 6 Rufus "Roadrunner" Ferguson,
44.8 36.6 Wisconsin's star tailback, was
0-0 3-1 held to 79 yards in 21 carries, hisl
er/ third successive games of less
4-92 1-1 than 100 yards.
6-60 5-37 Hare, who had completed only1
22 of 49 passes going in, hit ont
6 0 nine of 12 for 120 yards. Hare com-
6-0 0-0 pleted his first six tosses, including
the 27-yard scoring pass to Gal-
0-0 0-0 bos. Completions of 17 yards to
0 0 Brian Baschnagel and six yards to
1 2 3 4 F Henson set up Henson's first touch-
down.
14 14 14 0 42 *
0 0 0 0 0 Hawks hustle
IOWA CITY - A 26-yard field
- - - - -- - - - -

goal by Harry Kokolus midway in
the final quarter yesterday earned
Iowa a 6-6 tie with Michigan State
in a Big Ten Conference football
game of fumbling offenses.
Michigan State marched 82
yards in 12 plays to score the
second time it had the ball. Re-
serve quarterback George Mi-
haiu scooted around left end, for
the final nine yards, but Marv
Roberts' extra point kick was
wide.
Iowa, 2-4-1 'also, scored in the
second quarter on Kokolus' 20-
yard field goal. The Hawkeyes set-
tled for the three-pointer after
having a first and goal at the two.
Iowa lost three yards. on the next
two plays before Kokolus madehis
successful boot.
Both teams bungled scoring
chances in the third quarter. Mark
Fetter's bobble at the Iowa 16
gave Michigan State the ball, but
four plays later the Spartans' Dave
Brown was stopped for no gain at
the eight.
Michigan State piled up 213
yards rushing on the misty after-
noon, but couldn't sustain a drive

after its first quarter touchdown.
I , Brown, who had 51 yards
in th : first half scoring drive,t
finished with 117 in 19 carries.
Iowa had only 59 yards on the
ground in 49 rushes and added
58 passing.
* * *
Riveters belt Illini
WEST LAFAYETTE - Purdue
held off a determined fourth-quar-
ter bid by winless Illinois yester-
day and escaped with a 20-14 Big
Ten football victory.
Senior quarterback Mike Wells
passed for a pair of touchdowns in
the second half and had Illinois
deep in Purdue territory again
before junior safety Carl Capria
made a game-saving interception
inside the Purdue 10-yard line with
5:09 remaining.
Wells, muffled most of the
g 'me, hit junior split end Gar-
vin Roberson on touchdown
plays covering 25 and 40 yards
to come back from a 17-0 defi-
cit.
The winning margin was pro-
vided for Purdue on a 74-yard
punt return by Junior Fred Coop-

'Cats claw
EVANSTON - A lucky bounce-
pass from Mitch Anderson to end
Jim Lash for an 81-yard scoring
play rallied Northwestern's Wild-
cats to their first Big Ten victory
with a 23-14 defeat of Indiana yes-
terday.
Winless in four previous con-
ference starts, Northwestern twice
came from behind to leave Indi-
ana with a 2-2 Big Ten record 'as
the Hoosiers had to rely on rookie
Rod Harris as a starting quarter-
back.
Harris, replacing injured vet-
eran Ted McNulty, smashed two
yards for a touchdown to give
Indiana a 7-0 lead midway in the
first quarter.
GRIDDE PICKINGS
MICHIGAN 42, Minnesota 0
Purdue 20, Illinois 14
Northwestern 23, Indiana 14
Michigan State 6, Iowa 6
Ohio State 28, Wisconsin 20
Davidson 25, Bucknell 21
Cornell 34, Yale 13
Gettysburg 30, Lehigh 28
Dayton 14, VMI 10
Western Michigan 34, Ohio 17
Auburn 27, Florida State 14
Colgate 28, The Citadel 26.
Georgia Tech 21, Tulane 7
Clemson 31, Wake Forest 0
Williams and Mary 17, VPI 16
Baylor 15, Texas A&M 13
W. Texas St. 21, Wichita St. 16
Drake 28, New Mexico St. 10
Pacific 22, Idaho 7
DAILY LIBELS 999, ASCE -1
EAST
Dartmouth 21, Harvard 21
Penn State 28, West Virginia 19
Syracuse 10, Pittsburgh 6
Pennsylvania 15, Princeton 10
Holy Cross 26, Villanova 9
Slippery Rock 30, Waynesburg 9
Miami, Fla. 28, Army 7
MIDWEST
Eastern Michigan 30, New Mex-
Highlands 6
Ferris State 20, Northwood Michigan 3
Wayne State 34, Illinois-Chicago 0
Michigan Tech 7, Moorhead State 0
Oklahoma 52, Kansas State 0
Missouri 20, Colorado 17
Nebraska 34, Oklahoma State 0
Notre Dame 21, Texas Christian 0
Bowling Green 46, Marshall Univ. 7
Toledo 25, Miabi, Ohio 21
Northern Illinois 28, Kent State 7
Quantico Marines 20, Northern
Michigan 6
Akron 14, Cent. Michigan 10
SOUTH
Duke 17, Navy 16
Tennessee 34, Hawali 2
Georgia 13, Kentucky 7
Maryland 24, Virginia 23
Mississippi 31, Vanderbilt 7
Mississippi State 27, Houston 13
No. Carolina State 42,
South Carolina 24
Alabama 48, So. Mississippi 11
Texas 45, Rice 9
Texas Tech 17, So. Methodist 3
WEST
Stanford 17, Oregon State 11

PASSING

att
Morgan 8
Lawing 5
Totals 13

comp
3
2
5

int
4
0
4

Minnesota
Attendance: 84,190

~'M' Huggers batter Wisconsin,
nab second in Chicago tourney'

Special To The Daily
CHICAGO-The Michigan Rugby Club rebounded
from a disappointing loss to place second in the
Chicago Lions' Octoberfest Rugby tournament yes-
terday, crushing Wisconsin 24-3.
Wisconsin scored first on a drop goal by their
South African fly half Dave Pinion, but Michigan
quickly took command of the game to win going
away. Wingback Brad Whitmore took a pass from
Ross Vickers, after Vern Plato set up the play,
and scampered 60 yards down the sideline for a
try to give Michigan the lead.
Good ballhandling led to another score by Whit-
more when he scissored off Chuck Holt for his
second try. Hustling Cleland Child scored next as
he altertly scooped up a Wisconsin fumble caused

Drukis, and the other forwards stymied Wisconsin
all day. On the rare occasions Wisconsin worked
the ball out to their backs, crisp tackles by John
Bohlke, Ron Smith, and John Braun killed the
attack. Larry Lucarrelli won most of the hooks,
both in set scrums and on loose play.
Unfortunately, Michigan only took second place
in the tournament as they fell to the powerful
Chicago, Lions 14-4. Chicago's experience was de-
cisive on the muddy field, despite a fine effort by
Michigan. Whitmore's 55 yard try was the Blue's
only score.
Kicking and ball handling is the name of the
game in rugby, which Michigan has yet to learn.
If they do, the Chicago Lions would be apt teach-
ers. For the tuition of a few bruises the weekend

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