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October 26, 1972 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-26

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 26, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 26, 1972
I I

A . Homecoming '72
TONIGHT!1
PEP RALLY-7:30 p.m.
BETA THETA P1 HOUSE with the "M" Cheer-
leaders, "BO" and the Football team.
SOCK HOP-9:00 p.m.
UNION BALLROOM featuring Jimmy & the Jav-
elins and Chastity and the Belts.
AND-

Wolverines'

secondary

saves

face

By BOB McGINN
QUESTION: What do you do if you're a head
coach on the eve of the season opener and your
defensive backfield consists of a veteran playing
a new position, an untried sophomore, and a pair
of reserves who didn't figure at all in your
preseason plans?
ANSWER: You pray a lot.
That was the situation which faced Bo Schem-
bechler just prior to this fall's inaugural against
Northwestern. Injuries had struck down three
dependable regulars from his four-man secondary,
which figured to be inexperienced anyway after
graduation grabbed three starters from his 1971
Rose Bowl squad. It was a time of legitimate
concern.
"WE WERE definitely worried about our pass
defense," said defensive back coach Gary Moel-
ler. "But we had confidence in our backup
people."
As everyone remembers, the Wildcats played
an extremely conservative ground game, which
graciously allowed the green Michigan defensive
backfield a chance for game experience. Since
then the unit has performed far better than

even the most optimistic Wolverine backers
thought possible.
A year ago Michigan's pass defenders were
frequently criticized. The Wolverine rushing de-
fense was so overwhelming that a short pass
completion became a major offensive thrust.
But the coaching staff realized that All-America
Torn Darden and regulars Frank Gusich and
Bruce Elliott would be sorely missed.
Still, with Gusich's impressive replacement
Geoff Steger, hard-hitting cornerbacks Tom Drake
and Dave Elliott, and standout senior Randy
Logan returning, the defensive backfield ap-
peared to be solid again.
THEN MISFORTUNE struck. First, Steger
suffered a serious forearm injury in the Spring
Game, which ruled him out for the entire
season, and then Elliott incurred a shoulder
separation a week before the opener. Drake,
meanwhile, played sparingly in Los Angeles
against UCLA until a severe hip injury shelved
him. Only Logan remained intact.
Moeller says of the senior standout from De-
troit: "Logan is one of the few players who force
an offense to run away from him. The last team

that challeuged him-that is, ran sweeps to the
wide side of the field-was UCLA. That night
Randy lived in their backfield, tackling ball-
carriers four times for losses. I guess everyone
else got the message, because nobody has tried
that again."
Schembechler, who makes it a policy not to
praise individuals to any great extent, has been
ecstatic over his wolfman's play. "Logan has
played magnificent football all year, and has
certainly bee* a stabilizing influence among our
younger people," Bo commented recently.
The other members of the cast are sophomore
safety Dave Brown and cornerbacks Barry
Dotzauer and Roy Burks.
BROWN HAS PERFORMED at his integral
position like a battle-hardened veteran. A vicious
hitter, the 6-2, 187 pound Akron native is third
on the club in tackles, besides breaking up six
passes and intercepting one.
His 40 tackles to date are all the more mean-
ingful when it is remembered that his superb
predecessor, Darden, ranked but seventh on the
1971 tackling charts.
The diminutive Dotzauer (6-1, 168) had diffi-

culty in the first few contests, according to
Moeller, but since then "has played far better
than we had any reason to anticipate." His
picturesque interception against the Green
Meanies of Michigan Stake two weeks ago saved
a touchdown, and earned him the defensive
"Champion of the Week" award.
Logan's replacement at short-side corner, the
6-2, 185 pound sophomore Burks of Midland, has
to be rated as an astonishing surprise. Of the 84
Wolverines listed in Michigan's Press Book,
Burks had the least written about him. Besides
the basic information, two words were used to
describe him-"good hitter."
HE HAS CLEARLY lived up to his "advance
billing." Moeller feels his play against the run
has been "exceptional."
Michigan's pass coverage is 90% man-to-man
and its basic philosophy is "to always have a
group around the ball." MSU quarterback Mark
Niesen would probably attest to the fact that it's
working, as close to half a dozen of his well-
thrown aerials were jarred loose from his re-
ceivers by Maize and Blue defenders.

Michigan's Greaser

Queen !

to be crowned at the dance.
Come greased and ready to Kick Ass!
All events FREE!

i

WASHTENAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SHORT TERM
Mechanic Train ,ing Program
SECOND QUARTER
ADVANCE TUNE UP 056
Starts Monday, October 30, 1972, Six (6) Weeks, 7:30-10:00 p.m.
A specialized course using the latest tune up procedures and equipment.
Scope instruction includes reading and interpretation. The following sec-
tions of the scope pattern: firing line, spark line, intermediate section and
Dwell section are included, as well as the effects of lean and rich air fuel
mixtures on engine operation characteristics.
SNOWMOBILE 063
Starts Thursday, November 2, 1972, Six (6) Weeks, 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Specialized instruction in the operation and service procedures of snow-
mobiles. Emphasis is placed on Tune Up and periodic maintenance.
BASIC TUNE UP 043
Starts Saturday, November 4, 1972, Six (6) Weeks, 9:00-12:00 a.m.
This class will cover the fundamentals necessary for proper tune up. Stu-
dents will receive practical experience on their own vehicles.
SATURDAY'S MECHANIC 059
Starts Saturday, November 11, 1972, Six (6) Weeks, 9:00-12:00 a.m.
This course covers minor testing and repair procedures, minor tune up,
lubrication and cooling systems. Students will receive practical experience
on their own vehicles.
LOCATION WASHTENAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER
5115 CARPENTER ROAD
YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN
COST: $20.00 PER COURSE PHONE NUMBER: 434-1555
PLEASE CALL TO MAKE A RESERVATION FOR
THE CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE

Season tickets for Michigan
basketball and hockey seasons
are on sale entitling the Univer-
sity's faculty, staff and students
to reduced rates for both sports.
Although regular reserve ticket
prices are $36, staff and faculty
general admission tickets for the
18-game hockey schedule a r e
$18, students $9.
The sale of student basketball
season tickets will be announced
later.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Presents
TH E LAST
0CHAPTER
Produced by BENJAMIN and
LAWRENCE ROTHMAN
Narrated by THEODORE BIKEL
The Story of 1000 Years
of Jewish Life in Poland
and the Destruction of
Polish Jewry.
8 p.m., Sat-Sun.,
Oct. 28-29
at -leI,1429 HilSt.
50C ADMISSION

HEADS BIG TEN REFEREES

Robrig judges

'striped St. Peters'

By DAN BORUS
Herman F. Rohrig has done
quite a lot on Big Ten gridirons.
Rohrig in his heyday could stop
a scoring drive, could wrench
balls from contestants at will,
could signal for a touchdown by
just whistling. But despite all
his accomplishments, Herman F.
Rohrig is not a pigskin legend.
Unless, of course, you're a
basketball or football official ...
in that case, if you work in the
Big Ten, he's your boss.
Outfitted with a black and
white striped shirt, a whistle,
and a funny little hanky, the
power and whims of the offic-
ials play an integral role as the
arbiters of the clash between
22 men.
Making order out of chaos isn't
easy. The Lord took six days, but
the officials have pass inter-
ference and only sixty minutes
to contend with.
The complexity of the rules
and the split-second decisions
require men with some highly
developed skills.
Unlike the Big Eight which
WOMEN INVITED
TG
PHI RHO SIGMA
MEDICAL FRATERNITY
10/27
THIS FRIDAY-8 P.M.
220 N. INGALLS
across from St. Joseph's Hospital
BEER, WINE AND MUSIC

trains and procures its own of-
ficials, the Big Ten is the George
Allen of football conferences,
bringing its servants in from the
small conferences.
When officials are needed for
an open slot in the refereeing
stable, Supervisor Rohrig, the
first and only full time supervis-
or for the conference, phones the
Mid-America conference or the
Inter-Ohio conference asking for
the top three men on a look-and-
see basis.
Once one leaves the minor
leagues of officiating and makes
the Big Ten, an official is still
not in complete control of the
ball game; it is not his to tramp
upon as his whim desires. The
Conference provides an observ-
er at every game played under
Conference auspices.
Rohrig is quick to point out
that incompetent people have
been relieved of duty and more
competent put in their place.
Two qualitiesaretfeatured in
every "ref" that the Big Ten
hires - physicality and experi-
ence. Rohrig strongly believes
that the first impression - we-
ther or not the man can keep
up with the hurly burly of ac-
tion - and his experience dic-
tate his success in the Big Ten.
Rohrig insists upon experience
-those who have it don't make
mistakes. "We don't even look at
a man if he does not have at
least five years on the high
school and five years on the
small college level," he says.
Sometimes, however, experi-
ence is not the answer to referee-
ing errors - and they do hap-
pen. For instance, the referees
who mistakenly awarded Miami

an unprecedented fifth down in
its showdown with Tulane, had,
on the average, five to ten years
experience in big time college of-
ficiating.
One frequent complaint, espe-
cially in basketball, is that the
refs are "homers", calling 'em
to please the thundering multi-
tudes that fill tightly packed
Big Ten arenas and stadia.
This is vehemently denied by
the members of the whistle-toot-
ing fraternity. "If we ever find
of such a case, that man won't
be working for us," maintains
Rohrig. But an interesting statis-
tic has been unearthed by some
pundit and received publication
in a national sporting maga-
zine - that more fouls (statis-
tically significant) are called

against visiting squads
Most "refs" have some fairly
interesting reasons for joining
the profession but the monetary
enhancement is not one of them.
A dead ad in the Daily notes
that in 1959 the Big Ten voted to
raise the pay scale of refs to
$100 per game. The Big Ten re-
cord book has not other notes
on the pay of referees per game
in its mention of official business
transacted by the Athletic Direc-
tors of the Conference.
For some "refs," the thrill of
competition and the spectacle of
college foot''all is a chance to
relieve real or imagined grid
glories of long gone crisp fall Sat-
urday afternoons. And maybe an
unconscious need to censor past
actions.

S

I

Gridde Pickings
HENRY KISSINGER, presidential adviser and lady killer rolls onto
his back after a vigorous round of love-making.
"Gee, you were dynamite, Henry," his voluptuous bedmate softly
coos, "but don't you ever take off your glasses.
"Not a chance, baby," Henry replies. "You never know when
one of those kinky Daily reporters might be sneaking around the
room. They really go in big for these smutty stories."
"Henry, can you get up for some pizza?"
"Hey, that sourds like a good idea, get your clothes on in a
hurry."
"Where are we going, Henry?"
"To Italy, of course, let's go, the jet is waiting."
If you're in the mood .for some pizza you need only to look
as far away as 420 Maynard where you can win a Mr. Pizza pizza
by submitting your winning grid pick selections.
1. Minnesota at MICHIGAN 10. Ohio at Western Michigan
(pick score) 11. Florida St. at Auburn
2. Illinois at Purdue 12. Colgate at Citadel
3. Indiana at Northwestern 13. Tulane at Georgia Tech
14. Clemson at Wake Forest
4. MSU at Iowa 15. VPI at William and Mary
S. OSU at Wisconsin 16. Texas A&M at Baylor
6. Bucknell at Davidson 17. Wichita St. at West Texas St.
7. Yale at Cornell 18. New Mexico St. at Drake
8. Lehigh at Gettysburg 19. Pacific at Idaho
9. VMI at Dayton 20. ASCE at the LIBELS
CHAVURAT A[IYA-ISRAELI STUDENTS UNION '
BET CAFE
4 Enjoy Israeli music, food, discussions
in an informal atmosphere.
' THIS WEEK'S HIGHLIGHT:
Film: LET MY PEOPLE GO !
SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 7 P.M.
936 DEWEY (off Packard)
761-3161

I

14th Dist. County Commission candidates
KATHY FOTJIK-Dem.
LETTY WICKLIFFE-Rep.
SUSAN WINNING-HRP
DEBATE
Friday, October 27-7:30 p.m.
Public Library-5th and William

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