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October 25, 1972 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-25

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Poge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

Poge Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 25, 1972

Nixon campaign expenditures
double amount spent by Dems

*MARCOS GOVT.
Instructor jailed

(Continued from Page 1)
at the University of the Philin-

WASHINGTON Of)-Committees
set up to finance President Nixon's
re-election campaign have spent
at least $22 million since April,
almost double the amount spent
for Democratic presidential can-
didate George McGovern.
New reports filed with the Gen-
eral Accounting Office (GAO)
showed yesterday that while the
chief Nixon finance committee was
slightly in debt earlier this month,
its numerous satellites had a min-
imum of $4.7 million going into-
the final two weeks of the cam-
paign.
McGovern's key campaign com-
mittee, McGovern for President,
Inc., of Washington, D.C., showed
a cash deficit of $107,000 and debts
of $2.86 million. But contributions
appeared to be flowing in at a
greater rate than those for Nixon.
The expenditures of the two

presidential candidates were culled
from more than 1,000 pages of re-
ports from dozens of committees.
The reports cover the period
Sept. 1-Oct. 16, but also include
cumulative totals going back to
April 7 when a new federal elec-
tions law went into effect requiring
disclosure quarterly and on the
15th and 5th days before a primary
or general election.
Because of a delay caused by
the federal government's obser-
vance of the Veterans' Day holiday
Monday, when the reports were
due, the GAO had processed only
a few of the hundreds of reports
on hand.
Those available included six
major Washington-based Nixon
committees and 20 state commit-
tees. Only cumulative totals were
available for McGovern for Presi-
dent, Inc., and the GAO said it
would be another day before the

full 2,100-page report was pro- ' dt.1IVCL61LLIM ).lAA.
cessed. pines.rHe joined the University
The largest listed contributor to chapter of the Citizens for Civil
Nixon' during the Sept. 1-Oct. 16 Liberties. The group is described
Nixo duingtheSep. 1Oct 16by a local Fili ino student as a
period was John Louis Jr., chair-b
person of the board of Combined liberal reformist organization
Communications Inc. of Chicago. protesting government suspen-
Louis gave $82,819, dividing it up
in $5,521 chunks among various
committees. He was listed in thet
last spending reports on Sept. 10 Wireit7e
as giving $37,593.
Among other large contributors
was Samuel Schulman of Beverly
Hills, Calif., an owner of the San
the Seattle Supersonics profes- (Continued from Page i)
sional basketball team and vice to Sally Fortuna, director of Inter
chairperson of National General Actions.
Corp. Schulman gave $75,574. Charges for Saturday Night In-
Jack Dreyfus, a New York mu- surance include a $15 registration
tual fund executive, was listed as fee to cover three dates, an in-
contributing $66,000. John Newing- formation packet and a question-
ton of Greenwich, Conn., listed as naire. Three dollars per date is
"retired," was down for $49,105. subsequently charged.

sion of the writ of habeas corpus
and bemoaning the general de-
cay of democracy in the Philip-
pines.
Friends of Rocamura regis-
tered surprise at his arrest, call-
ing him a moderate liberal. Ac-
cording to Edwardo Pagasa,
grad, Rocamura is a "civil rights
advocate," in contrast to what
he called the more radical pos-
ture of his wife.
Describing the arrest to His-
tory of Art Chairman Richard
Edwards, Ms. Rocamura wrote,
"The night before President
Marcos publically declared mar-
tial law (Sept. 23) four Metro-
com (Metropolitan branch of the
Philippine Constabulary) troopers
banged on our gate at 1:30 a.m.
with an 'invitation' for Joel to
come to the local stockade for
questioning.
"He has been there--ques-
tioned butnever charged-a poli-
tical prisoner ever since. They.
have nothing on Joel."
L

The Quality Is

Been Zapped!I
... by not gaining enough
information from what
you read?
... by a lot of anxiety at
exam time?
. . . with lousy grades
when you really thought
you were doing well?
... by some kind of study
or reading problem?
If so, call the Reading
Improvement Service for
information. Registration
for a 6 week reading ef-
ficiency and Study Skills
Classes, Oct. 27.
$6.00 for six hours.

A review of proposed peace plans

(Continued from Page 1)
said Monday that in his recent dis-
cussion with North Vietnamese
Chief Negotiator Le Duc Tho, he
was told that there has been no
change in its "fundamental posi-
tion" regarding Thieu.

Also, it is in no sense a technical
matter whether an agreement stip-
ulates the withdrawal of American
forces simply from South Vietnam,
or from all places which are at
present being used to perpetrate
American involvement in the war.

More on Centurions

A complete dismantling of the U S.
war effort would involve the clos-
ing of bases in Thailand and Guam,
as well as the departure of our
aircraft carriers from the Indo-
china area.
Finally, reported North Vietna-
mese sentiments regarding an im-
minent settlement have been far
from euphoric.
The New York Times reported
from Hanoi Monday that "At the
highest level here, the peace ne-
gotiations are still described as
possibly pre-election acrobatics."
All these facts dispute the wide-
ly-held notion that a settlement is
immiment, although it is, of course,
possible that they could somehow
be resolved. Reports available thus
far seem to indicate that they have
not been.

f'
1
If-

Inter Actions charges one flat
fee of $25 and up (depending on
atge and2income) for a two-year
period.
Dating services tend to be used
primarily by 20 to 50 year-olds.
Most members are men from 20 to
26 and women over 35.
Though the number3of men and
women patrons is equal, the age
and sex disparity causes prob-
lems.
"I have gone as far as to go out
to girls' dorms recruiting and giv-
ing out free dates because. of the
lack of college-age girls," says
Mary Montgomery, a director of
Saturday Night Insurance.

GEORGE WASHINGTON
Got his shag
at the
U-M BARBERS
& Stylists

C

I

i

(Continued from Page 3)
methods on handling people. So
Scott says to the novice, Stacy
Keach, "When you stop 'em; if
they don't run for cover, kick
'em around for a while and then
bust 'em."
In their personal lives, the cen-
turions are caught in a dilemma.
As social martyrs they must
choose between dedication to the
force and their responsibilities
to their families. The rookie and
his wife seem to be auditioning
for a soaper with their incessent
quarreling. Finally she leaves
him for a more secure life. Kil-
vinski has been divorced by his
wife. Yet the film takes another
turn. Keach attaches himself to
the bottle and Scott shoots him-
self in the head, thereby weakly
affirming that a man should not
devote his whole life to police

work.
Contrast Centurions to Dirty
Harry. Despite its legal and psy-
chological inconsistencies, Dirty
Harry is a powerful film which
compels the audience to identify
with Clint Eastwood. The acting,
the impact of the situations, and
the existential tone of the film
are so overwhelming that they
completely obscure any faults
that Dirty Harry might have.
The New Centurions, on the
other hand, moves in spurts.
Some of the action is good. Most
is bad. The acting fluctuates
from a tenable performance by
Scott to absolute nothingness
from Keach. But most of all,
Centurions' lack of an overall
driving force results in a film
that fails both in its efforts to-
wards social commentary and
entertainment.

I

!III

THE WOODROW WILSON SCHOOL OF
PUBLIC AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
Princeton University
will interview men and women interested in
careers in:

ECOLOGY HINT
TORONTO (1P) - For the first
time in this Canadian province,
there will be a slogan on next
year's motor vehicle 1 i c e n s e
plate: Ontario Keep It Beautiful.
It was selected from a list of sug-
gestions aimed at keeping the
traveling public ecology-minded.
FOREST
FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES
\i

ANTI-WAR MARCH
after Homecoming Game
from Stadium to the Diag
Speakers and music
provided by the Rockets
Sponsored by the Michigan Peace Comm., McGovern-
Shriver Nat'l. Comm., and Students for McGovern.
Paid Political Advertisement
IMAGINE THIS:
A mountain of steamed corned
beef piled high on a New York
Onion Roll, garnished with a
slice of dill pickle.
Stop Dreaming
Start Eating
In the MICHIGAN UNION
ower level

Reading
Improvement Service
The University of Michigan
1610 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Phone: (313) 764-9481
FOREST
FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES

i Sizzlin'
steak Dinner $1.79
I 3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile-
J '. . . there is no career that can match BUSINESS in
diversity of intellectual interest . . . A vigorous, free society
calls for the highest type of business leadership . . ."
Stanf ord MBA
REPRESENTATIVE
COMING TO CAMPUS
o A representa'ive of the Stanford Graduate School of Business
will be on campus to discuss, with interested students, the
V exceptional educational opportunity of the Stanford MBA
ti Program.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31
Appointments may be made through
The Office of Placement Services
The Stanford MBA program isa two-year general manage-
ment course designed for highly qualified men and women
who have majored in liberal arts, humanities, science, or
engineering.
THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305
XEROX
COPY SERVICE Available
Seven Days a Week
and Six Nights fill10
FOUR CENTS PER COPY*
The University Celar
with
Five Machines Available
83 Hours per Week
*Lower Rates for Large Quantities
Higher Rates for Reductions, Rag Bond Paper, and Books

,I

GOVERNMENT SERVICE
URBAN PLANNING
JOURNALISM
ENVIRONMENTALI
POLICY

ELECTORAL POLITICS
POLICY RESEARCH
INTERNATIONAL
RELATIONS
ECONOMIC DEVELOP-
MENT

at University of Michigan-
Career Planning & Placement
on Monday, October 30, 1972

University Cellar inC
MICHIGAN UNION BASEMENT

',l ij

Subscribe
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Insanity Is Not
The Issue
Papoon For President

SHOP THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
9:30 A.M. TO 9:00 P.M.

Refined turtleneck

"He's Not Insane"

I

You're Probably Wondering
Why We're Here

Mini-Courses in Religion, Voting Behavior
BEGIN THIS WEEK
BEGINNING TODAY! "Religion and the American Academic Scene"
Dr. Noel Freedman, M.C.-Penny Kramer, T.F.
(Info: 764-4475)
ORIENTATION/REGISTRATION: TONIGHT, OCTOBER 25, 8 P.M.
2402 MASON HALL
LECTURERS: Krister Stendahl, Dean, Harvard Divinity School
Theodore Gill, Chairman of Division of Humanities, John Jay College.
RobertBelloh, Princeton Center for Advanced Studies.
Total class meetings: (8)-October 25-November 13
BEGINNING TOMORROW! "Voting Behavior & American Presidential Politics"
a .a. - . 20 --I

overblouse of
Dacron polyeste
knit by Jane Ho
layering staple v
skirts, blazers, v
care in navy or
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LITTLE SEPARATES

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Service. Want to find out about getting a certain blood test? Got
an idea for improving service in our pharmacy? Think you were
billed incorrectly?
Call INPUT. We answer questions, cut red tape, and stand up
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