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October 25, 1972 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-25

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-,

Doge Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 25, 1972

G ravel speaks here;
blasts U.S. secrecy.
By GORDON ATCHESON Throughout his term in the Sen-
"The s u r v i v a I of humankind sate Gravel said he hasardently
should not be left to politicians but opposed the existence of the peace-
should be in the hands of the peo- time draft. He. said he expects the
pie," said Sen. Mike Gr'avel yes- current draft law will not be ex-
terday afternoon. tended next year.,.Gravel also said
he favored amnesty for all con-
Gravel (D=Alaska) addressed a scientious objectors, exiles, and
200-person crowd at the UGLI Mul- swar criminals" including William
tipurpose Room. He emphasized Calley.
the American public's need and
right to knowv about the affairs of. Toward the end of his speech
government. Gravel hit United States foreign
er .policy hard, charging "the people
Gravel claimed "98 per cent of in power believed we needed sec-
what is now secret should be made recy to fight the cold war-from
public, which can only improve the that time laws have kept informa-
government. Now the electorate tion from the American people. It
cannot evaluate issues. It just does may have been the beginning of
not have the facts." the end."

SPEAKS AT UGLI
Weicker backs GOP hopefuls

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By ANGELA BALK
"These threerguys represent ev-
erything I'm trying to do in the
Republican Party," said Senator
Lowell Weicker (R-Conn) in a
campaign speech yesterday in sup-
port of Sen. Robert Griffin, Con-
gressman Marvin Esch, and Mi-
chael Renner, Republican candi-
date for the Michigan House of
Representatives from the 53rd dis-
trict.
About ten persons, including Ren-
ner, were present for the meet-
ing in the UGLI Multipurpose
Room.
The Republican party, accord-

ing to Weicker, "has said "no" to
labor and minorities in the past,
but it intends to change this policy
in the future. Weicker's mission,
he said, is to create "an image of
warmth and caring for people" for
the Republican party and thus helpj
to make what he called "an en-
tirely different party."
Griffin "speaks for the people
of Michigan" and is not afraid to
stand out for his constituents
against the party, said Weicker. He
went on to say that he did not con-
sider that the Republican party
had a dominant ideology but that
I "a good Republican is a Republi-

can who's elected."
Weicker's favorable opinions of
Griffin and Esch come from work-
ing with them, he said. He added
that he was not campaigning for
,them because his party sent him
but because "I wanted to."
Weicker said that the Republi-
can party will appeal to young
votersbecause Republicansyare
"implementers" who "can make
the ideals (of young people) reali-
ties."
Weicker's speech in Ann Ar-
bor was sponsored by Students for
Renner.

"The Cursed and the Blessed: The Generation of
Aushwiz and Jerusalem-A Dialogue
with the Theologians"
DR. EMIL FACKENHEIM and DR. IRVING GREENBERG
UNIV. OF TORONTO UNIV. OF NEW YORK
The Holocaust as an orienting experience-(a (a Sinai and the Exodus)
challenge to faith-faith and doubt after the Holocaust. The end of the
secular-religious Jew dichotomy; Holocaust as the test of communal stand-
ards of humanity and the positive as well as negative conclusions we can
draw from tht experience; technology and science after Auschwitz; Ausch-
witz and Jerusalem. What is there left to believe in about God, man,
history.and Judaism?
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26 8 P.M. HILLEL, 1429 HILL

Later at a news conference, he
blasted the Nixon administration
for . the Watergate affair. He
charged "Richard Nixon is totally
involved in Watergate. No one else'
on the face of the earth would
have had any use for that infor-
mation."
Gravel said he believes the pub-I
lic is just beginning to realize the
implications of the Watergate af-
fair, which he says could provide
the impetus to propel George Mc-
Govern into the White House. Still
Gravel conceeded "the national
(Democratic) ticket is in a tough
situation."
During the speech, Gravel also
condemned Defense Department
spending. He said the defense
budget has risen $8 billion since
last year, pointing to overkill as
the major reason. "By 1976, we
will have enough warheads to de-
stroy the Soviet Union 56 times.
They will be able to destroy us 22,
times. Obviously w e' r e well
ahead."

He continued his analysis "if the
United States had an open foreign1
policy, we would benefit the thirdI
world nations instead of the dic-'
tatorships of the world." Gravel
characterized South Korea as such
a dictatorship operating under the
guise of democracy.
Gravel went on to claim the
United States is slowly losing its
own democracy. He assessed the
current state of democracy as "a
child accepting paternalistic infor-
mation and paternalism is the
most sophi'sticated type of
tyranny."
The solution, according to Gra-
vel, is "allowing the people to
know everything. They will make
mistakes, but I'd rather take my
chances with that than with the
current paternalism."
Gravel, who has been stumping
across Michigan for the last two
days, concluded both his speech:
and news conference bythanking
his hosts in Ann Arbor, Demo-
cratic hopefuls Bob Carr, Marvin
Stempien, and Perry Bullard.
3I

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CITY NOTICE
Ann Arbor Cablecasting Commission
A public meeting of the Commission will be held at 7:30
P.M. on Friday, October 27, 1972, in the Council Chamber at
City Hall. The meeting will be devoted to Commission dis-
cussion and voting on amendments to the draft operating
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lished in the Ann Arbor News on Sunday, October 15, and are
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tary on the third floor of City Hall.
Persons wishing to propose specific amendments to the
draft rules may do so by submitting them in writing to the
Commission's Secretary, not later than 4:00 P.M. on October
27.
For the Commission by:
SIDNEY G. WINTER Chairman
Date of Publication: Wed., Oct. 25, 1972.
WINTER TERM COURSES
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