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October 24, 1972 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-24

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, Octooc,- ?41 1 9-12

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, Octoo~, 24 1972.

Voters to decide referenda across

U.S.

By The Associated -Press
Taxes, especially those levied
on property to support schools,
are under attack in various Nov.
7 ballot propositions across t h e
country.
Also facing voters are issues af-
fecting the environment, e q u a I
rights, criminal justice, the me-
chanics of government, mari-
juana laws and the 1976 Winter
Olympics as they decide on state
referenda, constitutional amend-
ment and the like.
California is asking voters if
they want to legalize the private
use, but not sale, of marijuana.
The measure is not expected to
receive many favorable votes.
Michigan, Oregon, Washington,
California and Colorado confront
the issue of property tax and
equal support of public schools.
Proposal C on the state baliot
would prohibit local property tax-
es for public schools and direct
the legislature to come up wi'h
new financing.
Proposal D would lift the con-
stitutional ban on a state-grad-
uated _income tax, which some
say might lead to an increase of
as much as 100 per cent in the
present 3.9 per cent levy.
While chances for passage ap-
pear good, the state AFL-CIO
opposes the ┬░property tax ban for
fear it will lead to a sales ta:
The question on Colorado's bal-
lot is whether to shift the esti-
mated $350 million ca! lected Jia
property taxes for schools to
other revenue sources.
The measure has the backing
of labor and the citizens lobby,
Common Cause, in the hopes of

evening out wide disparities in
per-pupil expenditures.
Opponents, among them Gov.
John Love, fear state government
won't have enough money to oper-
ate if the other sources prove in-
adequate.
The property tax pays 80 per
cent of public education's way in
Oregon, and the State Farm Bur-
eau has succeeded in placing a
proposition on the ballot to pro-
hibit this means or rianc';ig
Arrayed against the proposi-
tion are virtually all other mna1-
or interests in the state, who fear
schools will close if the legisla-
ture can't agree on alternate ie-
venue sources..
The stakes aren't as great in
Washington, where voters a r e
being 'asked -to repeal a tws-
mill state property tax that sup-
plies $50 million annually for
public education.
In California, Proposition , 14
would cut property taxe i state-
wide by an estimated $3.2 bilion
a year and increase state sales
corporation, cigarette and liquor

taxes by an estimated $1.8 billion
annually. The legislatuu2 w o u 1 n
have to come up with the rest of
the funds needed to balaocc the
property tax cut.
The measure equalizes EchooT
support statewide, but foes say
that's done by cutting s c h a o 1
aid by $771 million a year state-
wide.
Proposal B in Michigan and a
similar proposal in North Dakota
would allow women less than 20
weeks pregnant to have an
abortion performed by a certified
doctor.
A unique Colorado ballot pro-
position could turn away t hi e
Winter Olympics scheduled there
in 1976.
The state has spent some $1.9
million in planning for the games,
but growing opposition and un-
certainty over the full cost in-
volved prompted the ballot-box
answer on whether to cut off fur-
ther funds.
A negative answer would send
the Olympic Committee looking
elsewhere since federal support

is contingent on local support
and without either, the games
could not be held.
The environment occupies a
large space on New York's bal-
lot with the question of whethe'r
to approve a $1.15 -billion bond
issue. It would devote $650 mnil-
lion to water quality projects,
$15 million for cleaner air and
$350 million for land.
Two referenda in Florida would
together provide $240 million for
state purchase of environmentally
endangered lands, and parks and
recreation sites.
Four states are taking a look

at some aspect of the crimin-i
justice system. New Mexico and
Connecticut are asking for ap-
proval of six-member juries fol-
lowing U.S. Supreme Court sanc-
tion of juries with fewer than 12.
Rhode Island's proposed con-
stitutional amendment would re-
store voting ,rights to prisoners,
and a proposition in California
would restore the death penalty,
which was knocked down by the
state supreme court.
Five states. Hawaii, Texas,
New Mexico, Washington, a ni d
Colorado, have their own version
of an equal rights amendment
for women on the ballot.

-- - - d

Want to improve your spoken German?
Join us for the German Language Night
TUESDAY, OCT. 24-9:00 P.M.
Al RIVE GAUCHE
(Hill & East University)
GERMAN CLUB

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED TO HELP PASS
PROPOSAL B
" Distribute literature in your
dorm or residence
* Request speakers and films for classes
and residences
* Leaflet polls November 7th
for information stop by
ABORTION REFERENDUM
table in Fishbowl, Mon., Tues., Fri., 8-1
or call 971-2413 A.M., or 973-2397 P.M.
sponsored by Michigan Abortion Referendum Committee
-- - - -----
Subscribe to The Daily
Phone 764-0558

I

JARF IELD
BL UES
BAND
217ASRH 2PtM-2A
TUE./WED.
Fellini's semi - autobiog-
raphical film. Often very
funny, always interesting.
With Marcello Mastroi-
anni and Claudia Cardi-
nale.
Italian, with subtitles
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7 & 9 p.m.75c

;i

LSA
Coffee hou r
Tuesday, October 24
3:00-4:30 p.m,,.
with
The Chemistry D303C e pt
.

I ommomm

Join

the Dail
Phone,

y Sports
764-0558

Staff

. ..U

I

lr 1

4t,'

75t

h
TL

w EE wA w~

OCT. 23=28

Canon

SAWYER'S PROJECTORS
. ONSALE!

at %U51KKIU EEw I v

BAUER E201
Electronic
Strobe

LU:,
.:

N ikkormat
FTN
With 50mm F 2

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$59.50
Reg. $78.30

$89.50
Regularly
$105.00

$2340

Reg.
$269.00

BAUER E161
Electronic Strobe
$49.50-Reg. $63.50

I

With'50mm Ff1.4

Rotomatic
Model 727AQ

$2850

Reg.
$320.00

Sawyer's Mol7

~59.00

Reg.
$65.00

WITH CASE
w/5mm F/18 l

les- Rea. $148.40

w/50mm

i .V .
F/1.4 lens - Reg. 230.00

NOW v
'163.00
195.00

Sawer'
Grand Prix Model 570M
'44.50
Reg. $47.00

Sawyer's

DARKROOM
SUPPLIES.
ON SALE!
SALE

U

PRICE

PHOTOGRAPHIC

ACC

ESSE

w/55mm
F/1,8 lens

" .
}_
:;<:.'
,
:: ;.

)RIES
SAWYER'S
ROTOTRAY
X1.79
Reg. $1.95

Paterson

b19o SO
Regularly
$199,503

'Agfa Magnifier

Reg. Price $2.25 "

Darkroom Lamp red.or4orange)*5s.45
5pieg. rage 84

TRIPOD

Gold Crest 1060-L TDR
Reg. Price $29.95

22.50

Carousel B-80 $2.35
SLIDE TRAYS Reg. $2.65

Paterson
THERMOMETER
Paterson
6" FUNNEL R
GAF Vividol
DEVELOPER
(The long life paper developer)
Kodak - 1 Gal.
ACID FIXER R
Kodak -1 Gal.
D - 16 Reg. Pric

Reg. Price $3.95
g. Price $1.15
Reg. Price 95c
Reg. Price 76c

' 1

GAF 64

Color
Slide Film
20 exp. 35mm

SOUND SECTION
SCOTCH RECORDING TAPE

Prinz Fieldmaster
CAMERA BAG

┬░29.95

Reg.
$39.95

General
Electric
FLASH
CUBES
25C ea.

'2.95
~1.49
~.85
~.66
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'5.50

e $1.07

TYPE 150
7" reel '/4" x 1800'

Coast 805 eather
CAMERA BAG

BrookE
THERMOMETER

Reg. Price
$3.44 p

per reel

. limit
2 rolls
8 per roll
Reg. $145 per roll

(Suitable for'
still or
movie camera)

Dial Developing
Reg. Price $7.95

'22.50
Reg. $27.95

S5/9.95
Scotch type 203, Recording Tape
7" reel 1/%" x 1800' Reg. $319
Dynarange Series $4.23$
5 for $14.95

or 4 for 95c
Reg. 3 For 97c

Kodak
Drymount Tissue
25Sh
25Sh
25Sh

UKI

4, AAA

5x7
8x10
11x14

$ .b7
1.20
2.15

.59
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1.85
$139.50

Omega

B-22
ENLARGER
TWA I~ FMCL DfAAI

I I II

,I

I

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